Download Free Forgiving And Not Forgiving Why Sometimes Its Better Not To Forgive Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Forgiving And Not Forgiving Why Sometimes Its Better Not To Forgive and write the review.

In our culture the belief that "To err is human, to forgive divine," is so prevalent that few of us question its wisdom. But do we ever completely forgive those who have betrayed us? Aren't some actions unforgivable? Can we achieve closure and healing without forgiving? Drawing on more than two decades of work as a practicing psychotherapist, more than fifty indepth interviews, and sterling research into the concept of forgiveness in our society, Dr. Jeanne Safer challenges popular opinion with her own searching answers to these and other questions. The result is a penetrating look at what is often a lonely, and perhaps unnecessary, struggle to forgive those who have hurt us the most and an illuminating examination of how to determine whether forgiveness is, indeed, the best path to take--and why, often, it is not.
Describing forgiveness as a Judeo-Christian imperative, the author explores betrayal and honesty while questioning the appropriateness of unconditional forgiveness
For psychologists and psychotherapists, the notion of forgiveness has been enjoying a substantial vogue. For their patients, it holds the promise of "moving on" and healing emotional wounds. The forgiveness of others - and of one's self - would seem to offer the kind of peace that psychotherapy alone has never been able to provide. In this volume, psychologist Sharon Lamb and philosopher Jeffrie Murphy argue that forgiveness has been accepted as a therapeutic strategy without serious, critical examination. They intend this volume to be a closer, critical look at some of these questions: why is forgiveness so popular now? What exactly does it entail? When might it be appropriate for a therapist not to advise forgiveness? When is forgiveness in fact harmful? Lamb and Murphy have collected many previously-unpublished chapters by both philosophers and psychologists that examine what is at stake for those who are injured, those who injure them, and society in general when such a practice becomes commonplace. Some chapters offer cautionary tales about forgiveness therapy, while others paint complex portraits of the social, cultural, and philosophical factors that come into play with forgiveness. The value of this volume lies not only in its presentation of a nuanced view of this therapeutic trend, but also as a general critique of psychotherapy, and as a valuable testimony of the theoretical and practical possibilities in an interdisciplinary collaboration between philosophy and clinical psychology.
Whenever anything goes wrong our first instinct is often to find someone to blame. Blame infuses our society in myriad ways, seeding rancor and revenge, dividing lovers, coworkers, communities, and nations. Yet blame, appropriately placed and managed, safeguards moral order and legal culpability. In this book, Stephen Fineman explores this duality inherent in blame, taking us on a fascinating journey across blame’s sometimes bitter—sometimes just—landscape. Fineman focuses on blame’s roots and enduring manifestations, from the witch hunts of the past to today’s more buttoned-up scapegoating and stigmatization; from an individual’s righteous anger to entire cultures shaped by its power. Addressing our era of increasing unease about governance in public and private enterprises, he delves behind the scenes of organizations infected with blame, profiling the people who keep its plates spinning. With a critical eye, he examines the vexing issue of public accountability and the political circus that so often characterizes our politicians and corporations lost in their “blame games.” Ultimately, Fineman raises the challenging question of how we might mitigate blame’s corrosive effects, asking crucial and timely questions about the limits of remorse and forgiveness, the role of state apologies for historical wrongdoings, whether restorative justice can work, and many other topics. An absorbing look at something we all know intimately, this book deepens our understanding of blame and how it shapes our lives.
In eight studies, Douglas Connelly leads the way to help you discover, understand and practice what the Bible says about forgiveness.
Has anyone ever hurt you? Have you ever hurt anyone? Forgiveness is a two-way street. Sometimes you need to do the forgiving, and sometimes you need to be forgiven. Whichever side of the street you're on, the road to forgiveness is a difficult journey. Preparation must be done, obstacles avoided and delays overcome. You can get lost, get stuck or just give up. But the good news is the route for your final destination has been planned out for you in the best map available - the Bible. Through its pages, you can learn about God's ultimate plan in which Jesus made it possible for you to be forgiven through His grace. You also learn how to extend forgiveness to others - and to yourself. The Road to Forgiveness may not be an easy one to travel, but it's a necessary one for all of us.
'I can't decide what to do with your ashes. It's been nearly a year now...This is not forgiveness. Don't think that.' ..A gripping and controversial psychological drama from acclaimed author, Celia Rees.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact