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Barack Obama's speech on the Edmund Pettus Bridge to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery marches should have represented the culmination of Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream of racial unity. Yet, in Fracture, MSNBC national correspondent Joy-Ann Reid shows that, despite the progress we have made, we are still a nation divided—as seen recently in headline-making tragedies such as the killing of Trayvon Martin and the uprisings in Ferguson and Baltimore. With President Obama's election, Americans expected an open dialogue about race but instead discovered the irony of an African American president who seemed hamstrung when addressing racial matters, leaving many of his supporters disillusioned and his political enemies sharpening their knives. To understand why that is so, Reid examines the complicated relationship between Barack Obama and Bill and Hillary Clinton, and how their varied approaches to the race issue parallel the challenges facing the Democratic party itself: the disparate parts of its base and the whirl of shifting allegiances among its power players—and how this shapes the party and its hopes of retaining the White House. Fracture traces the party's makeup and character regarding race from the civil rights days to the Obama presidency. Filled with key political players such as Shirley Chisholm, Jesse Jackson, John Lewis, and Al Sharpton, it provides historical context while addressing questions arising as we head into the next national election: Will Hillary Clinton's campaign represent an embrace of Obama's legacy or a repudiation of it? How is Hillary Clinton's stand on race both similar to and different from Obama's, or from her husband's? How do minorities view Mrs. Clinton, and will they line up in huge numbers to support her—and what will happen if they don't? Veteran reporter Joy-Ann Reid investigates these questions and more, offering breaking news, fresh insight, and experienced insider analysis, mixed with fascinating behind-the-scenes drama, to illuminate three of the most important figures in modern political history, and how race can affect the crucial 2016 election and the future of America itself.
A provocative and lively deep dive into the meaning of America's first black presidency, from “one of the most graceful and lucid intellectuals writing on race and politics today” (Vanity Fair). Michael Eric Dyson explores the powerful, surprising way the politics of race have shaped Barack Obama’s identity and groundbreaking presidency. How has President Obama dealt publicly with race—as the national traumas of Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Freddie Gray, and Walter Scott have played out during his tenure? What can we learn from Obama's major race speeches about his approach to racial conflict and the black criticism it provokes? Dyson explores whether Obama’s use of his own biracialism as a radiant symbol has been driven by the president’s desire to avoid a painful moral reckoning on race. And he sheds light on identity issues within the black power structure, telling the fascinating story of how Obama has spurned traditional black power brokers, significantly reducing their leverage. President Obama’s own voice—from an Oval Office interview granted to Dyson for this book—along with those of Eric Holder, Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, Andrew Young, and Maxine Waters, among others, add unique depth to this profound tour of the nation’s first black presidency.
A collection of Barack Obama's greatest speeches edited by columnist E.J. Dionne and MSNBC host Joy Reid. We Are the Change We Seek is a collection of Barack Obama's 26 greatest addresses: beginning with his 2002 speech opposing the Iraq War and closing with his final speech before the United Nations in September 2016. As president, Obama's words had the power to move the country, and often the world, as few presidents before him. Whether acting as Commander in Chief or Consoler in Chief, Obama adopted a unique rhetorical style that could simultaneously speak to the national mood and change the course of public events. Obama's eloquence, both written and spoken, propelled him to national prominence and ultimately made it possible for the son of a Kenyan man and a white woman from Kansas to become the first black president of the United States. These speeches span Obama's career--from his time in state government through to the end of his tenure as president--and the issues most important to our time: war, inequality, race relations, gun violence and human rights. The book opens with an essay placing Obama's oratorical contributions within the flow of American history by E.J. Dionne Jr., columnist and author of Why The Right Went Wrong, and Joy Reid, the host of AM Joy on MSNBC and author of Fracture.
"This text fills an enormous gap in the field. The interactive style makes it accessible to both graduate and undergraduate students, providing thought-provoking insight into a complex topic. Of special note is the book's contemporary focus on social identity formation and intersectionality. Through exercises and examples, it encourages self-awareness and strategies to help students engage in dialogues about racism." —Donna Harris, LCSW, Bryn Mawr College "In this timely revision, Miller and Garran offer an insightful and comprehensive guide for critical practice. The book’s unambiguous attention to the impact of power and structural oppression on individuals, organizations, and communities is thoughtfully paired with accessible clinical case examples and applications."—Hye-Kyung Kang, Seattle University "Miller and Garran provide a clear, comprehensive, and accessible guide to understanding and addressing racism. It is filled with useful conceptual frameworks, exercises, and tools for helping professionals and others concerned about racial equity."—Diane J. Goodman, EdD, Diversity Consultant This comprehensive text thoroughly reviews the theories and history of racism, the sociology of and the psychology of racism, intergroup relations and intergroup conflict, and how racism is manifested institutionally, between groups, and between people, providing a unique view of the connections between these multiple perspectives. Readers can then apply this knowledge to their work as helping professionals. Students learn to explore their own biases and how they influence their view of themselves and others, which strengthens their work with future clients. Fulfilling NASW and CSWE cultural competency requirements, this book teaches socially just practices to helping professionals from any discipline. Many people want to dismantle racism but they do not know how. This book gets us closer to that goal. Using critical race theory as a conceptual framework, the text analyzes all levels of racism: personal, professional, institutional, and cultural. Integrating theory, research, and practice, racism is linked to other forms of oppression with an emphasis on how helping professionals can respond. Tips on how to facilitate racial dialogues are provided. Early chapters map out the contours of racism and later chapters emphasize how to dismantle it. Readers appreciate the book’s sensitive approach to this difficult topic. Examples and exercises encourage insight into understanding racism, and insightful analyses offer strategies, solutions, and hope. Readers learn to respond to racism in all contexts including working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. New to the Second Edition: Reflects recent sociopolitical changes including "Islamophobia," the Obama presidency, the murders of young men of color by police, the racialization of the criminal justice system, and current immigration issues in its analysis of racism. More cases and experiential exercises help readers explore how racism is manifested and how to incorporate the lessons learned into future working environments. More emphasis on the intersectionality of racism and other social oppressions including class, gender, sexual orientation, citizenship, immigration experiences, and disability to give readers a better understanding of the relationship between these issues. PowerPoints and Instructor's Manual with sample syllabi, teaching tips, and suggested videos and related websites. An ideal text for advanced courses on racism, oppression, diversity, prejudice and discrimination, or racism and professional practice, this book also appeals to helping professionals (social workers, psychologists, counselors, and nurses) who need to understand racism to better serve their clients.
"He Never Came Home is a collection of 22 personal essays written by girls and women who have been separated from their fathers by way of divorce, abandonment, or death. The essays in He Never Came Home are organized into three categories: "Divorce," "Distant," and "Deceased.""--

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