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Until comparatively recent times, knowledge that black Africa was the seat of highly evolved civilizations and cultures during a time when Europe stagnated was limited to a small group of scholars. That great empires such as Ghana, and later, Mali flourished for centuries while Europe slept through its dark ages almost has been ignored by historians. Thousands of years before that, as Rudolph R. Windsor notes in this enlightening book, civilizations began with the black races of Africa and Asia, including the Hebrews, who in Biblical times were jet black. Then, western Europe had no nations as such, and its stone age inhabitants had but the crudest tools and lived in caves.Because of the scarce literature on the contributions of blacks to world civilizations, most people today hold the erroneous opinion that the black races have little real history. It was not known, for instance, that the ancient Hebrews, Mesopotamians, Phoenicians, and Egyptians were black. Now, a growing body of literature is presenting the illustrious history of the blacks and their enormous contributions.This carefully researched book is a significant addition to this vital field of knowledge. It sets forth in fascinating detail the history, from earliest recorded times, of the black races of the Middle East and Africa. Dr. Windsor's discussion of Islamic civilization and the movement of the black Hebrew to all parts of Africa is edifying and absorbing. Readers, regardless to race, will find this factual story of a noble heritage a valuable enrichment to their knowledge of world history.
[Dedicated to the One and only God from whom all blessings flow]. This updated book tells it all – from the creation of Adam, to Black Abraham, Moses, Jacob, the invasion of the homelands of the Black Hebrew Israelites/Jews by the Assyrians, Neo-Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Muslims and others; the brutalization of the Black Jews and their near-decimation, as well as the story of the Khazars, who are today considered to be the real Jews. Mention is also made of the historical Black Jesus. This book is illustrated with ancient images of Biblical characters.
In August of 1991, the Brooklyn neighborhood of Crown Heights was engulfed in violence following the deaths of Gavin Cato and Yankel Rosenbaum—a West Indian boy struck by a car in the motorcade of a Hasidic spiritual leader and an orthodox Jew stabbed by a Black teenager. The ensuing unrest thrust the tensions between the Lubavitch Hasidic community and their Afro-Caribbean and African American neighbors into the media spotlight, spurring local and national debates on diversity and multiculturalism. Crown Heights became a symbol of racial and religious division. Yet few have paused to examine the nature of Black-Jewish difference in Crown Heights, or to question the flawed assumptions about race and religion that shape the politics—and perceptions—of conflict in the community. In Race and Religion among the Chosen Peoples of Crown Heights, Henry Goldschmidt explores the everyday realities of difference in Crown Heights. Drawing on two years of fieldwork and interviews, he argues that identity formation is particularly complex in Crown Heights because the neighborhood’s communities envision the conflict in remarkably diverse ways. Lubavitch Hasidic Jews tend to describe it as a religious difference between Jews and Gentiles, while their Afro-Caribbean and African American neighbors usually define it as a racial difference between Blacks and Whites. These tangled definitions are further complicated by government agencies who address the issue as a matter of culture, and by the Lubavitch Hasidic belief—a belief shared with a surprising number of their neighbors—that they are a “chosen people” whose identity transcends the constraints of the social world. The efforts of the Lub­avitch Hasidic community to live as a divinely chosen people in a diverse Brooklyn neighbor­hood where collective identi­ties are generally defined in terms of race illuminate the limits of American multiculturalism—a concept that claims to celebrate diversity, yet only accommodates variations of certain kinds. Taking the history of conflict in Crown Heights as an invitation to reimagine our shared social world, Goldschmidt interrogates the boundaries of race and religion and works to create space in American society for radical forms of cultural difference.
An insightful anthology of writings and historical documents on the relationship between blacks and Jews in the U.S. covers three centuries of sometimes complementary, sometimes troubled history.
Jews have always resembled the peoples among whom they live, whether in Africa, Asia, or Europe. Why should American Jews be an exception? In a land where racial and ethnic boundaries are becoming increasingly blurred, the American Jewish community is also shifting. In Every Tongue is both a groundbreaking look at the changing faces of the Jewish people and an examination of the timelessness of those changes. Ranging from distinct communities of African American Jews and adopted children of color in white Jewish families to the growing number of religious seekers of all races who hope to find a home in Judaism, In Every Tongue explores the origins, traditions, challenges, and joys of diverse Jews in America.This book explodes the myth of a single authentic Judaism and shines a bright light on the thousands of ethnically and racially diverse Jews in the United States who live full and rich Jewish lives. It is impossible to read In Every Tongue without coming away with a deeper respect for and a broader understanding of the Jewish people today. In a time when Jewish community leaders decry the shrinking of the Jewish population, In Every Tongue imagines a vibrant and daring future for the Jewish people: becoming who they have always been.

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