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'East End Vernacular' presents a magnificent selection of pictures - many never published before - revealing the evolution of painting in the East End of London and tracing the changing character of the streets through the 20th century.
A dynamic tale of art and friendship, set between the World Wars, against the backdrop of a rapidly changing world Eric Ravilious is one of the best-known twentieth-century English artists. For many, his watercolors capture the spirit of midcentury England. But while he had a style of his own, he did not work in isolation; he worked within a network of artists that included fellow students at the Royal College of Art such as Edward Bawden, Barnett Freedman, Enid Marx, Percy Horton, Peggy Angus, and Helen Binyon. The story of this beloved artist is also a biography of the group of fellow creators with whom he associated—men and women who inspired, challenged, and influenced one another—from their student days up through the Second World War. Drawing on extensive research, Andy Friend considers the predecessors in the English watercolor and wood-engraving tradition that influenced the group’s art and demonstrates the significance of women artists, whose place within this interwar-era network has often been neglected. Published to coincide with the seventy-fifth anniversary of Ravilious’s death, Ravilious & Co. accompanies an exhibition of the same name, touring throughout England in 2017.
"Linda Montano is the ultimate practitioner of art in life, life in art. These conversations with other artists about four primal aspects of the everyday—sex, food, money, death—uncover the heart, the nerve, and the scar tissue behind some of the late 20th century's edgiest work."—C.Carr, The Village Voice
Children, Childhood and Cultural Heritage explores how the everyday experiences of children, and their imaginative and creative worlds, are collected, interpreted and displayed in museums and on monuments, and represented through objects and cultural lore. Young people constitute up to half the population of any given society, but their lives are inescapably influenced by the expectations and decisions of adults. As a result, children’s distinct experiences are frequently subsumed within the broader histories and heritage of their families and communities. And while adults inevitably play a prominent role in children’s lives, children are also active creators of their own cultures. As this volume so vividly demonstrate, the cultural heritage of children is rich and varied, and highly revealing of past and present attitudes to children and their work, play, creativity, and human rights. The essays in this book span the experiences of children from classical Rome to the present moment, and examine the diverse social and historical contexts underlying the public representations of childhood in Britain, Europe, North America, Australia, North Africa and Japan. Case studies examine the heritage of schools and domestic spaces; the objects and games of play; the commemoration of child Holocaust survivors; memorials to Indigenous child-removal under colonial regimes; children as collectors of objects and as authors of juvenilia; curatorial practices at museums of childhood; and the role of children as visitors to historical sites. Until now, the cultural heritage of children and the representations of childhood have been largely absent from scholarly discussions of museology, heritage places and material culture. This volume rectifies that gap, bringing together international experts in children’s histories and heritage. Aimed at a wide readership of students, academics, and museum and heritage professionals, Children, Childhood and Cultural Heritage authoritatively defines the key issues in this exciting new field.
When a local photographer stumbled upon 1,000s of David Granick's colour slides in early 2017, he knew he had struck gold. These images capture the post-war streets of Stepney, Whitechapel, Bow and beyond in the warmth of Kodachrome hues at a time when black and white photography was the norm. Left untouched on a library shelf for 37 years, and revealed now for the first time, these photographs show an East London on the cusp of social transition.

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