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Judith Lorber and Lisa Jean Moore consider the interface between the social institutions of gender and Western medicine in this brief, lively textbook. They offer a distinct feminist viewpoint to analyze issues of power and politics concerning physical illness. For a creative, feminist-oriented alternative to traditional texts on medical sociology, medical anthropology, and the history of medicine, this is an ideal choice.
Essentialist notions of gender difference are being challenged increasingly by research on the social construction of gender. Lorber and Farrell present a key collection of current research which illustrates how the constructivist approach has been applied to a variety of issues, including those centred on the family, the workplace, social class, ethnic identity and politics. Much of the recent work in this area has appeared in the journal Gender and Society which is the genesis of most of the papers in this volume.
Chloe Bird and Patricia Rieker argue that to improve men's and women's health, individuals, researchers, and policymakers must understand the social and biological sources of the perplexing gender differences in illness and longevity. Although individuals are increasingly aware of what they should do to improve health, competing demands for time, money, and attention discourage or prevent healthy behavior. Drawing on research and cross-national examples of family, work, community, and government policies, the authors develop a model of constrained choice that addresses how decisions and actions at each of these levels shape men's and women's health-related opportunities. Understanding the cumulative impact of their choices can inform individuals at each of these levels how to better integrate health implications into their everyday decisions and actions. Their platform for prevention calls for a radical reorientation of health science and policy to help individuals pursue health and to lower the barriers that may discourage that pursuit.
In the late 1990s, Egypt experienced a boom period in in vitro fertilization (IVF) technology and now boasts more IVF clinics than neighboring Israel. In this book, Marcia Inhorn writes of her fieldwork among affluent, elite couples who sought in vitro fertilization in Egypt, a country which is not only at the forefront of IVF technology in the Middle East, but also a center of Islamic education in the region. Inhorn examines the gender, scientific, religious and cultural ramifications of the transfer of IVF technology from Euro-American points of origin to Egypt - showing how cultural ideas reshape the use of this technology and in turn, how the technology is reshaping cultural ideas in Egypt.
Social psychologists have often assumed that situations and behaviour are gender neutral, yet assumptions about gender have affected the questions they have posed as well as the answers they have provided. The authors of this volume explore the ways in which social psychology has simultaneously ignored and been deeply influenced by gender. They also consider the ways in which gender differences are not the same as sex differences.
"In Into Our Own Hands, Sandra Morgen shows us, not just how the women's health movement started, but how it weathered adversity. This book is important reading for everyone who cares about the future of women's health as defined by women themselves." --Cynthia A. Pearson, executive director, National Women's Health Network "This is an analytically sophisticated and engaging contribution to our understanding of the feminist health movement."--Karen Brodkin, professor of anthropology and women's studies, UCLA Recent history has witnessed a revolution in women's health care. Beginning in the late 1960s, women in communities across the United States challenged medical and male control over women's health. Few people today realize the extent to which these grassroots efforts shifted power and responsibility from the medical establishment into women's own hands as health care consumers, providers, and advocates. Into Our Own Hands traces the women's health care movement in the United States. Richly documented, this study is based on more than a decade of research, including interviews with leading activists; documentary material from feminist health clinics and advocacy organizations; a survey of women's health movement organizations in the early 1990s; and ethnographic fieldwork. Sandra Morgen focuses on the clinics born from this movement, as well as how the movement's encounters with organized medicine, the state, and ascendant neoconservative and neoliberal political forces in the 1970s to the 1980s shaped the confrontations and accomplishments in women's health care. The book also explores the impact of political struggles over race and class within the movement organizations.
Labor, laws, and love. Yen Le Espiritu explores how racist and gendered labor conditions and immigration laws have affected relations between and among Asian American women and men. Asian American Men and Women documents how the historical and contemporary oppression of Asians in the United States has (re)structured the balance of power between Asian American women and men and shaped their struggles to create and maintain social institutions and systems of meaning. Espiritu emphasizes how race, gender, and class, as categories of difference, do not parallel but instead intersect and confirm one other.

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