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The transition from RE A level, or from entirely alternate roots (many RS students have not taken previous RS related courses), to Religious Studies at university requires some careful shepherding. The field is huge. This introductory book will provide a clear map for the key features of the terrain. The two main strands shaping the book define what religions are and explain how Religious Studies approaches the religions. The language is clear at the same time as introducing some of the key terminology used in the study of religions. The study of religions and the academic discipline of Religious Studies are growing areas in tertiary education in the UK. The continued interest in RE AS and A level as well as the growth in cognate humanities and social sciences, such as Psychology, Sociology, Philosophy, at AS/A level and GNVQ level indicates the significant interest amongst students on matters that pertain to culture and humanity in general. Students realise that religion is a driving force in contemporary culture and the study of it is central to understanding the contemporary world. The statistics on religious belief bear out their interest: four billion out of the six billion people who inhabit the world profess religious belief; even in the 'secular' societies of the Western world religiosity is growing and changing--a recent BBC poll stated that 70% of people in the UK believe in a 'higher being' or spiritual force.
is a guide to getting the most out of a teacher training course in the United Kingdom. It covers both primary and secondary teaching and is suitable for students following undergraduate, postgraduate or alternative routes. The book gives a clear idea of what to expect from such courses, how to succeed on them and so make the best possible start to a career in teaching. Written by an experienced, innovative teacher educator it reflects up-to-date policy and research, highlighting new ideas about assessment, learning styles and subject understanding.
Get Set for Study Abroad is a guide-book for students who are thinking of studying outside the UK as part of their home degree and for others who want to know what is involved. It takes you through the whole process, from finding out about the opportunities available and making your selection of a programme up to completing the studies and returning home. It explains what things you need to think about at each stage as you make your preparations and then carry out your studies. There are sections on academic requirements, costs and funding. The book also offers advice on study skills and outlines issues which arise in intercultural communication. It gives particular coverage of programmes in the European Union (such as Erasmus/Socrates) and the USA, the two main areas of interest for UK students. Though the focus is largely on undergraduates, there are sections dealing also with postgraduate study. Student commentaries, a guide to web-sites and printed materials, and a glossary of the terms you are most likely to encounter are also included. The text cuts through the red-tape and bureaucratic language of much of the programme literature and presents a student-friendly viewpoint with candour and good humour.
We are all psychologists. As human beings, we all have intuitive beliefs and ideas about why people do the things they do, and the ability to form such beliefs is an important part of surviving and getting on in the world. Indeed those few individuals who lack this ability are severely disadvantaged. Studying psychology at a university level is both like and quite unlike these natural skills. Many of our beliefs about the social world are accurate, but some are unfortunately quite incorrect and misleading. How do we know when we are correct? How do we go about finding out? Our natural inclination is to seek evidence to confirm our beliefs, and therein lies prejudice. The answer from psychology is to form hypotheses and systematically test them against the evidence, and this is what makes psychology a science. This book aims to encourage and enable the reader to link a natural interest in human (and animal) behaviour with the sorts of models and theories that are used by academic psychologists. Part 1 covers the main areas of psychological endeavour, seeking to provide engaging examples of psychological questions, rather than to provide an exhaustive account. Part 2 addresses the business of living and studying at university, inviting the reader to reflect on what psychology has to say about being a student.
This book is aimed at students who are thinking of studying Computer Science or a related topic at university. Part One is a brief introduction to the topics that make up Computer Science, some of which you would expect to find as course modules in a Computer Science programme. These descriptions should help you to tell the difference between Computer Science as taught in different departments and so help you to choose a course that best suits you. Part Two builds on what you have learned about the nature of Computer Science by giving you guidance in choosing universities and making your applications to them. Then Part Three gives you some advice on what to do once you get to university, how to get the most out of studying your Computer Science degree. The principal objective of the book is to produce happy students, students who know what they are letting themselves in for when they start a Computer Science course, and hence find themselves very well suited for the course they choose.
Buddhism in the United States is often viewed in connection with practitioners in the Northeast and on the West Coast, but in fact, it has been spreading and evolving throughout the United States since the mid-nineteenth century. In Dixie Dharma, Jeff Wilson argues that region is crucial to understanding American Buddhism. Through the lens of a multidenominational Buddhist temple in Richmond, Virginia, Wilson explores how Buddhists are adapting to life in the conservative evangelical Christian culture of the South, and how traditional Southerners are adjusting to these newer members on the religious landscape. Introducing a host of overlooked characters, including Buddhist circuit riders, modernist Pure Land priests, and pluralistic Buddhists, Wilson shows how regional specificity manifests itself through such practices as meditation vigils to heal the wounds of the slave trade. He argues that southern Buddhists at once use bodily practices, iconography, and meditation tools to enact distinct sectarian identities even as they enjoy a creative hybridity.
This book is designed to give students and newly qualified teachers a contextual and theoretical background to this subject, by exploring and challenging assumptions about the place of religion in education. The book is divided into the following sections: section one sets out the context for religious education in the curriculum. It looks at political, social and religious influences on legislation, particularly in faith schools, and raises questions about assessment section two focuses on Religious Education in the classroom, exploring our understanding of religion and the concept of development in Religious Education section three examines Religious Education as a whole-school issue, considering its relationship to literacy, citizenship, collective worship and spiritual, ethical and moral development.

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