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Since the 1800's, many European Americans have relied on Native Americans as models for their own national, racial, and gender identities. Displays of this impulse include world's fairs, fraternal organizations, and films such as Dances with Wolves. Shari M. Huhndorf uses cultural artifacts such as these to examine the phenomenon of "going native," showing its complex relations to social crises in the broader American society—including those posed by the rise of industrial capitalism, the completion of the military conquest of Native America, and feminist and civil rights activism. Huhndorf looks at several modern cultural manifestations of the desire of European Americans to emulate Native Americans. Some are quite pervasive, as is clear from the continuing, if controversial, existence of fraternal organizations for young and old which rely upon "Indian" costumes and rituals. Another fascinating example is the process by which Arctic travelers "went Eskimo," as Huhndorf describes in her readings of Robert Flaherty's travel narrative, My Eskimo Friends, and his documentary film, Nanook of the North. Huhndorf asserts that European Americans' appropriation of Native identities is not a thing of the past, and she takes a skeptical look at the "tribes" beloved of New Age devotees. Going Native shows how even seemingly harmless images of Native Americans can articulate and reinforce a range of power relations including slavery, patriarchy, and the continued oppression of Native Americans. Huhndorf reconsiders the cultural importance and political implications of the history of the impersonation of Indian identity in light of continuing debates over race, gender, and colonialism in American culture.
Unser Trauma: eine Gesellschaft ohne Gemeinschaft. »Entbehrungen machen dem Menschen nichts aus, er ist sogar auf sie angewiesen; worunter er jedoch leidet, ist das Gefühl, nicht gebraucht zu werden. Die moderne Gesellschaft hat die Kunst perfektioniert, Menschen das Gefühl der Nutzlosigkeit zu geben. Es ist an der Zeit, dem ein Ende zu setzen.« Sebastian Junger Warum beschließen Soldaten nach ihrer Rückkehr aus dem Krieg und in die Heimat, sich zu neuen Einsätzen zu melden? Warum sind Belastungsstörungen und Depressionen in unserer modernen Gesellschaft so virulent? Warum erinnern sich Menschen oft sehnsüchtiger an Katastrophenerfahrungen als an Hochzeiten oder Karibikurlaube? Mit Tribe hat Sebastian Junger eines der meistdiskutierten Werke des Jahres vorgelegt. Er erklärt, was wir von Stammeskulturen über Loyalität, Gemeinschaftsgefühl und die ewige Suche des Menschen nach Sinn lernen können.
This transnational collection discusses the use of Native American imagery in twentieth and twenty-first-century European culture. With examples ranging from Irish oral myth, through the pop image of Indians promulgated in pornography, to the philosophical appropriations of Ernst Bloch or the European far right, contributors illustrate the legend of "the Indian." Drawing on American Indian literary nationalism, postcolonialism, and transnational theories, essays demonstrate a complex nexus of power relations that seemingly allows European culture to build its own Native images, and ask what effect this has on the current treatment of indigenous peoples.
This book is about transnational and transracial adoption in North American culture. It asks: to what extent does the process of international adoption reflect imperious inequalities around the world; or can international adoption and the personal experiences of international adoptees today be seen more positively as what has been called the richness of “adoptive being”? The areas covered include Native North American adoption policies and the responses of Native North American writers themselves to these policies of assimilation. This might be termed “adoption from within.” “Adoption from without” (transnational adoption) is primarily dealt with in articles discussing Chinese and Korean adoptions in the US. The third section concerns such issues as the multiple forms that adoption can take, notions of adoption and identity, adoption and the family, and the problems of adoption.
In Mapping the Americas, Shari M. Huhndorf tracks changing conceptions of Native culture as it increasingly transcends national boundaries and takes up vital concerns such as global imperialism, and the commodification of indigenous cultures.
A history of representations of American Indians in Jewish literature and popular media.

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