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How is sport in contemporary society related to sport in earlier civilizations? Why is the expenditure of energy involved in sport considered exhilarating, while the equivalent expenditure of energy in other contexts can be dispiriting? David Sansone offers answers to these questions and advances a revolutionary thesis to account for the widespread phenomenon of sport. Drawing upon ethnological findings to demonstrate the ritual character of sport, he explores the relationship between ancient Greek sport and sacrificial ritual and traces elements common to both back to primitive origins.
From statistical databases to story archives, from fan sites to the real-time reactions of Twitter-empowered athletes, the digital communication revolution has changed the way fans relate to LeBron's latest triple double or Tom Brady's last second touchdown pass. In this volume, contributors from Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States analyze the parallel transformation in the field of sport history, showing the ways powerful digital tools raise vital philosophical, epistemological, ontological, methodological, and ethical questions for scholars and students alike. Chapters consider how philosophical and theoretical understandings of the meaning of history influence engagement with digital history, and conceptualize the relationship between history making and the digital era. As the writers show, digital media's mostly untapped potential for studying the recent past via media like blogs, chat rooms, and gambling sites forge a symbiosis between sports and the internet while offering historians new vistas to explore and utilize. In this new era, digital history becomes a dynamic site of enquiry and discussion where scholars enter into a give-and-take with individuals and invite their audience to grapple with, rather than passively absorb, evidence. Timely and provocative, Sport History in the Digital Era affirms how the information revolution has transformed sport and sport history--and shows the road ahead. Contributors include Douglas Booth, Mike Cronin, Martin Johnes, Matthew Klugman, Geoffery Z. Kohe, Tara Magdalinski, Fiona McLachlan, Bob Nicholson, Rebecca Olive, Gary Osmond, Murray G. Phillips, Stephen Robertson, Synthia Sydnor, Holly Thorpe, and Wayne Wilson.
Der Autor beschäftigt sich in seiner Monographie mit der Frage, inwieweit es der Frau des Altertums und des Mittelalters möglich war, sportlichen Aktivitäten nachzugehen. Bereits für die alten Kulturen der Ägypter, Minoer und Mykener kann anhand zahlreicher ikonographischer Belege eine Bewegungskultur junger Frauen nachgewiesen werden, die neben dem Ballspiel und dem Schwimmen auch den rituellen und feierlichen Tanz sowie im Rahmen kultischer Feste vorgeführte, akrobatische Kunststücke beinhaltete. In der griechischen Kultur maßen sich junge Frauen in eigens ausgetragenen Wettläufen. Anstelle des Erwerbs von materiellem oder monetärem Reichtum verhalf ihnen der sportliche Sieg zum Eintritt in das geordnete Eheleben. Unter den römischen Frauen waren neben dem Ball- und Schwimmsport insbesondere leichtathletische Aktivitäten beliebt. Manche Frauen schreckten wohl auch nicht vor dem Gang in die Gladiatorenarena zurück, wo sie in Schaukämpfen gegen Ihresgleichen antraten. Im Mittelalter tritt die weibliche Bewegungskultur vermehrt in den Hintergrund oder zeichnet sich durch besondere Ausformungen wie etwa jenen im Rahmen eines Gottesurteils geführten Zweikampf aus.
From the identity of Greek athletes and the place of Greek games in the Roman era to forms, functions, and venues of Roman spectacles, this second volume of Sport in the Greek and Roman Worlds contains eleven articles and chapters of enduring importance to the study of ancient Greek and Roman sport, a field located at a crucial intersection of social history, archaeology, literature, and other aspects of those cultures. The studies have been updated with addenda by the original authors, and four of the articles that were originally published in German have been translated into English here for the first time. The studies, selected for breadth and importance of historical topics, include: the economics, status, gender, and training of ancient athletes; the place of Greek athletes in the Roman era; the evolution of Roman games from Etruscan customs and of the Roman arena from earlier traditions; the monetary prices of gladiators; the role of animal games in Rome; and the Roman team sport of chariot racing. A companion first volume complements this one with studies on Greek sport in its epic, heroic, and Bronze Age origins; the ancient Olympics in its relation to religion, politics, and diversity of competitors; Greek events in track and field and equestrian events. The articles in both volumes offer an excellent starting point to inspire newcomers to the study of ancient sport, and to give students and scholars an informative set of models for present knowledge and future research.
What was once a lifestyle for a small number of gay men in big cities has become a way of life for many, and the gay gym is now a culture on its own. Muscle Boys: Gay Gym Culture explores the evolution and current structure of this gay subculture that surfaced in San Francisco, West Hollywood, and New York during the 1970s. Covering ancient Greek gymnasium culture, modern bodybuilding practices, and homoerotic muscle-bound media, Muscles Boys examines the origins of the male athletic ideal. A sociological investigation on masculinity, fitness, HIV, steroids, and sex in the locker room, Muscle Boys dissects the gay gym experience, and celebrates gay body culture and its role in modern gay life. Author Erick Alvarez offers a candid study of the gay gym from his perspective as a physical trainer in the San Francisco Bay area, and from his interviews and online surveys of nearly 6,000 gay men. Muscle Boys: Gay Gym Culture is an enlightening read for anyone interested in gay body culture, and a valuable resource for academics working in GLBT studies, human sexuality, psychology, or athletics.
The second edition of Sport and Spectacle in the Ancient World updates Donald G. Kyle’s award-winning introduction to this topic, covering the Ancient Near East up to the late Roman Empire. • Challenges traditional scholarship on sport and spectacle in the Ancient World and debunks claims that there were no sports before the ancient Greeks • Explores the cultural exchange of Greek sport and Roman spectacle and how each culture responded to the other’s entertainment • Features a new chapter on sport and spectacle during the Late Roman Empire, including Christian opposition to pagan games and the Roman response • Covers topics including violence, professionalism in sport, class, gender and eroticism, and the relationship of spectacle to political structures

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