Download Free Hans Kelsens Pure Theory Of Law Legality And Legitimacy Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Hans Kelsens Pure Theory Of Law Legality And Legitimacy and write the review.

By showing how Kelsen's theory of law works alongside his political philosophy, the book shows the Pure Theory to be part of a wider attempt to understand how political power can be legitimately exercised in pluralist societies.
Positivist legal theorists inspired by Kelsen's work failed to appreciate the political-theoretical potential of the Pure Theory of Law and thus turned to a narrow agnosticism about the functions of law. The Pure Theory of Law, I conclude, may offer a paradigm of jurisprudential thought that could reconnect jurisprudence with political theory as it was traditionally understood: namely as a reflection on the best constitution and on the contribution that different legal actors and institutions can make to its realization.
The relationship between law and legitimacy is investigated in this book. The legal theories of three eminent public lawyers of the Weimar era are analyzed and the problems they address of legal and political order in a crisis-ridden modern society remain relevant to contemporary legal debates.
Historically, revolution has been one of the principal means of founding a new state. But can this new state have any moral legitimacy, born as it is out of violence? That is the critical question for legal theorists. The late Hans Kelsen, arguably one of the leading legal theorists and philosophers of the twentieth century, in his Pure Theory of Law, articulated this theory of revolutionary legality as a part of his general theory of law. Kelsen in the Grenada Court: Essays on Revolutionary Legality examines revolutionary legality in the context of the Grenada coup d'etat of March 1979, which brought the People's Revolutionary Government (PRG) to power. The 1973 Constitution was suspended, the executive authority of the country changed, parliament was reconstituted and a new Supreme Court established. The governing principles of political life in Grenada were transformed. The PRG had established a new legality. The courts however, were confronted with questions of their validity and jurisdictional competence. Called upon to judge the validity of the PRG regime, the issue of the validity of the courts was also called into question. Following the demise of the PRG regime in sensational fashion, culminating in the invasion of Grenada by the US army in 1983, the validity of the court was again challenged. This collection of clear, readily understood essays, shows that the Court determined its own validity as a matter of necessity. Using examples from around the Commonwealth, the case of Bernard Coard & Ors. v. The Attorney General, known popularly as the Maurice Bishop murder trial, or the Grenada Thirteen, McIntosh criticizes the Grenada Court and its handling of the subject of revolutionary legality; while addressing Kelsen's theory of continuity and discontinuity of law and the doctrine of necessity.
This book presents papers that deal with Hans Kelsen's legal philosophy, and includes contributions from Hedley Bull, J.W. Harris, Phillip Pettit, Joseph Raz, Jes Bjarup, and Stanley L. Paulson.
Reprint of the first edition. This classic work by the important Austrian jurist is the fullest exposition of his enormously influential pure theory of law, which includes a theory of the state. It also has an extensive appendix that discusses the pure theory in comparison with the law of nature, positivism, historical natural law, metaphysical dualism and scientific-critical philosophy. "The scope of the work is truly universal. It never loses itself in vague generalities or in unconnected fragments of thought. On the contrary, precision in the formulation of details and rigorous system are characteristic features of the exposition: only a mind fully concentrated upon that logical structure can possibly follow Kelsen's penetrating analysis. Such a mind will not shrink from the effort necessary for acquainting itself with...the pure theory of law in its more general aspects, and will then pass over to the theory of the state which ends up with a carefully worked out theory of international law." Julius Kraft, American Journal of International Law 40 (1946):496.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact