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Pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common condition that can take a substantial toll on the entire family system. Research suggests that families of youth with OCD face a unique set of difficulties in that they often are intimately involved in the child's symptoms. This involvement, also known as symptom accommodation, can be quite taxing, and it is often accompanied by high levels of distress, anxiety, and family conflict. These family responses, while natural and understandable, pose very real problems for treatment. Growing research suggests that poor family functioning undermines successful child OCD treatment. Helping Families Manage Childhood OCD provides clinicians with a comprehensive set of strategies for identifying and intervening with family dynamics that are likely to interfere with successful treatment of pediatric OCD. Moving beyond commonly employed techniques such as parent education and behavior management training, this manual includes skills training in emotion regulation for the entire family. It offers step-by-step strategies for helping family members to identify and manage their own emotional responses to OCD and provides a foundation for more effective and collaborative problem-solving around OCD. Through interactive exercises, families develop strategies for communicating around and troubleshooting difficult OCD episodes as well as strategies for promoting a more positive home environment in which to work on OCD.
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can develop at a young age and when it does, it can cause significant distress for the child and the family. Parents may be unclear on the nature of OCD symptoms and how to best respond to their child. Family involvement in the child's symptoms may be making the situation worse for the whole family. When treating young children with OCD, it is important to recognize the family component and directly involve parents in treatment. It is also essential to tailor the treatment to a child's age and developmental level. This therapist guide presents a family-based treatment for OCD specifically designed for children ages 5-8. Using a cognitive-behavioral approach, it provides psychoeducation for the family and a set of tools for the management of OCD. "Parent tools" involve differential attention, modeling, and scaffolding techniques. "Child tools" include cognitive strategies such as "bossing back" and using a feelings thermometer to rate anxiety. Treatment centers on exposure with response prevention (E/RP), in which the patient faces feared situations without avoidance or rituals until anxiety decreases. The therapist works with the family to create a hierarchy of E/RP tasks that will be conducted in session and practiced at home. A reward plan helps motivate the child to complete tasks and cooperate with parents. The program ends with relapse prevention to maintain gains and prepare for future symptoms. Therapy process issues are addressed throughout treatment to help families improve life at home. With helpful tips for adapting the program to a child's developmental level and family situation, this guide is a "must-have" for clinicians working with childhood-onset OCD. The corresponding workbook for families reinforces the skills introduced in session and provides forms for homework. Children, their parents, and their families will all benefit from this comprehensive treatment package.
The Clinician's Guide to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Childhood Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder brings together a wealth of experts on pediatric and adolescent OCD, providing novel cognitive behavioral strategies and considerations that therapists can immediately put into practice. The book provides case studies and example metaphors on how to explain exposure models to children in a developmentally appropriate manner. The book also instructs clinicians on how to use symptom information and rating scales to develop an appropriate exposure hierarchy. The book is arranged into two major sections: assessment and treatment of childhood OCD and special considerations in treating childhood OCD. Each chapter is structured to include relevant background and empirical support for the topic at hand, practical discussion of the nature and implementation of the core component (such as exposure and response prevention, cognitive therapy, psychoeducation and more), and a case illustration that highlights the use of a particular technique. Provides the strong theoretical foundation required to successfully implement treatment Highlights the use of particular intervention techniques through case studies Provides CBT strategies for anxiety, tic disorders, trichotillomania, ADHD and disruptive behaviors Includes strategies for treatment of patients who are initially non-responsive to CBT Encourages individualization of evidence-based and clinically-informed principles for each patient Reviews what to do if/when OCD remits and/or returns Provides details on differentiation OCD symptoms from anxiety and other psychopathology
Parenting Kids With OCD provides parents with a comprehensive understanding of obsessive-compulsive disorder, its symptoms, types, and presentation in children and teens. The treatment of OCD is explained, and guidelines on how to both find appropriate help and best support one's child is provided. Family accommodation is the rule, not the exception, when it comes to childhood OCD; yet, higher accommodating is associated with a worsening of the child's symptoms and greater levels of familial stress. Parents who have awareness of how they can positively or negatively impact their child's OCD can benefit their child's outcome. Case examples are included to illustrate the child's experience with OCD and what effective treatment looks like. OCD worsens when there is increased stress for the child; therefore, stress management is an essential component for improvement. Parents will learn how to manage stress in themselves and encourage effective stress management for their children.
This handbook examines and illustrates the integration of conceptualization and treatment of child and adolescent psychopathology. Conceptual models and intervention strategies are illustrated, and chapters cover several specific disorders and problem areas. The inspiration for this book arose largely from the teaching experiences of the editors, who found that while many students, as well as experienced clinicians, have knowledge in several theoretical domains and familiarity with a variety of interventions, significant numbers had difficulty linking the two.
No one wants to get rid of obsessive-compulsive disorder more than someone who has it. That's why Talking Back to OCD puts kids and teens in charge. Dr. John March's eight-step program has already helped thousands of young people show the disorder that it doesn't call the shots--they do. This uniquely designed volume is really two books in one. Each chapter begins with a section that helps kids and teens zero in on specific problems and develop skills they can use to tune out obsessions and resist compulsions. The pages that follow show parents how to be supportive without getting in the way. The next time OCD butts in, your family will be prepared to boss back--and show an unwelcome visitor to the door. Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) Self-Help Book of Merit
Giving a full overview of childhood obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and discussing all major treatment options, including cognitive behavioural therapy and medication, this guide provides the essential information that families, teachers, caregivers, clinicians and mental health professionals need in order to understand and treat childhood OCD. It covers origins, symptoms and related illnesses and explains how OCD is diagnosed. The book also suggests ways to maximise the outcomes of treatment, what to do when treatment doesn't work, and how to help manage OCD in children at school and in the home.

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