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This fully revised edition of the History of Art: A Student's Handbook introduces students to the kinds of practices, challenges, questions and writings they will encounter in studying the history of art. Marcia Pointon conveys the excitement of Art History as a multi-faceted discipline addressing all aspects of the study of media, communication and representation. She describes and analyses different methods and approaches to the discipline, explaining their history and their effects on the day-to-day learning process. She also discusses the relationship of Art History to related disciplines including film, literature, design history and anthropology. The fifth edition of this classic text includes: • information on why Art History is important and relevant in today’s world guidance on choosing a degree course case studies of careers pursued by Art History graduates advice on study skills and reading methods a bibliography and further reading detailed up to date advice on electronic resources and links to essential websites History of Art covers academic, training and vocational aspects of Art History, providing a wealth of information on the characteristics of courses available and on the relationship between Art History and the world of museums and heritage.
Hazel Conway introduces the student new to the subject to different areas of design history and shows some of the ways in which it can be studied and some of its delights and difficulties. No background knowledge of design history, art or architecture is assumed.
In this smart survival guide for students and teachers--the only book of its kind--James Elkins examines the ""curious endeavor to teach the unteachable"" that is generally known as college-level art instruction. This singular project is organized around a series of conflicting claims about art:""Art can be taught, but nobody knows quite how.""""Art can be taught, but it seems as if it can't be since so few students become outstanding artists.""""Art cannot be taught, but it can be fostered or helped along.""""Art cannot be taught or even nourished, but it is possible to teach right up to the beginnings of art so that students are ready to make art the moment they graduate.""""Great art cannot be taught, but more run-of-the-mill art can be."" Elkins traces the development (or invention) of the modern art school and considers how issues such as the question of core curriculum and the intellectual isolation of art schools affect the teaching and learning of art. He also addresses the phenomenon of art critiques as a microcosm for teaching art as a whole and dissects real-life critiques, highlighting presuppositions and dynamics that make them confusing and suggesting ways to make them more helpful.Elkins's no-nonsense approach clears away the assumptions about art instruction that are not borne out by classroom practice. For example, he notes that despite much talk about instilling visual acuity and teaching technique, in practice neither teachers nor students behave as if those were their principal goals. He addresses the absurdity of pretending that sexual issues are absent from life-drawing classes and questions the practice of holding up great masters and masterpieces as models for students capable of producing only mediocre art. He also discusses types of art--including art that takes time to complete and art that isn't serious--that cannot be learned in studio art classes.Why Art Cannot Be Taught is a response to Elkins's observation that ""we know very little about what we do"" in the art classroom. His incisive commentary illuminates the experience of learning art for those involved in it, while opening an intriguing window for those outside the discipline.
The Handbook of Research and Policy in Art Education marks a milestone in the field of art education. Sponsored by the National Art Education Association and assembled by an internationally known group of art educators, this 36-chapter handbook provides an overview of the remarkable progress that has characterized this field in recent decades. Organized into six sections, it profiles and integrates the following elements of this rapidly emerging field: history, policy, learning, curriculum and instruction, assessment, and competing perspectives. Because the scholarly foundations of art education are relatively new and loosely coupled, this handbook provides researchers, students, and policymakers (both inside and outside the field) an invaluable snapshot of its current boundaries and rapidly growing content. In a nutshell, it provides much needed definition and intellectual respectability to a field that as recently as 1960 was more firmly rooted in the world of arts and crafts than in scholarly research.
More than 50 art projects for gifted, mentally retarded, learning-disabled, physically challenged, socially and emotionally disturbed, and sensory-impaired children. Features step-by-step instructions and ideas for tailoring each project to specific student needs.
This book was written as an aid for newly trained art teachers, art students in college, and home instruction teachers in planning, organizing, conducting, and evaluating instructional activities for elementary, middle, and senior high school students. However, this handbook may also assist experienced art teachers who are open to expanding and/or refreshing their art instruction. Hobbyists might find this book beneficial in guiding them in actualizing their interests in art. Within the 282 page book are 63 individual lesson plans along with 151 illustration pages. Chapter 27 focuses on the art of pre-school children. Student evaluation, art history, managing student behavior, obtaining art supplies, a high school course of study, art related job opportunities, and reading recommendations are topical areas included in the appendices.

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