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Seit einiger Zeit zieht sich Michael zunehmend von seiner Frau Jolene und den beiden gemeinsamen Töchtern zurück. In einem schrecklichen Streit schleudert er Jolene sogar ins Gesicht, dass er sie nicht mehr liebe. Das Paar trennt sich. Als Jolene eines Tages schwer verwundet wird, kommt Michael endlich zur Besinnung: Ihm wird bewusst, dass er kurz davor ist, die Liebe seines Lebens zu verlieren, und er will ihr beistehen. Doch Jolene will ihn nie mehr sehen – zu tief sitzt der Schmerz. Aber Michael kämpft – wird es ihm gelingen, ihr Herz zurückzugewinnen?
Some have called America a country made by war, but in this original book Catherine Lutz takes a look at how the American twentieth century was shaped by our obsession with war preparation.Home to Fort Bragg, the largest U.S. Army base, Fayetteville has earned the nicknames Fatalville and Fayettenam. Unusual and not-so-unusual features of the town include gross income inequalities, an extraordinarily high incidence of venereal disease, miles and miles of strip malls, and a history of racial violence. Although most Americans don't live in military towns, Lutz's history of Fayetteville reveals the burdens that military preparedness creates for all of us. From secret training operations that use civilians as mock enemies and allies to the satellite economy of the town, her study poses the provocative question, "Are we all military dependents?"Homefront identifies military preparedness as an invisible yet profound shaper of American life in the twentieth century. Without condemning the military, the book prompts new ways of thinking about the place of organized violence in America.
There is a special place on the southeastern shores of Barkley Sound, on the west coast of Vancouver Island. It is a magnificent landscape of rocky cliffs fronting onto the wild Pacific Ocean, sheltered beaches and bays, lakes, mountains and forests. Since the beginning of time, it has been the ancestral home of the Huu-ay-aht First Nation. For thousands of years, the Huu-ay-aht lived on the land and sea according to age-old traditions and practices, changing and adapting when natural and human-made events presented challenges. The arrival of outsiders, beginning with explorers such as Captain James Cook in 1778, forever changed their world. Drawing directly from oral history passed down by generations of Huu-ay-aht chiefs and elders, Kathryn Bridge tells the compelling stories of the Huu-ay-aht people from their perspective. From creation tales and accounts of their traditional ways of doing things to alliances and conflicts with neighbouring tribes, this is a fascinating glimpse into the complex and rich history of a West Coast First Nation.
On the Home Front is the only comprehensive history of the Hanford Nuclear Site, America’s most productive and wasteful plutonium manufacturing facility. Located in southeastern Washington State, the Hanford Site produced the plutonium used in the atomic bombs that ended World War II. This book was made possible by the declassification in the 1980s of tens of thousands of government documents relating to the construction, operation, and maintenance of the site. The third edition contains a new introduction by John M. Findlay and a new epilogue by the author.
"I had never had a better understanding of the agony of military separation until I read Kristen Tsetsi's haunting and lyrical debut novel 'Homefront.' Tsetsi, who writes with the power of an old soul, artfully deconstructs aspirations and fears to show us that love, even under the best of conditions, is little more than an artifact of an imperfect heart and an inexplicable emptiness we can never name. She turns a discerning eye on the human condition and leaves us with great sympathy for her characters and ourselves while also providing us the unsettling knowledge that we are all to blame for what we allow to happen in both love and war." -- James Moore, author of "Bush's Brain"
THE STORY: The action is set in a comfortable suburban home in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, where Bob and Maurine, a fairly well-off middle-aged couple, are living (apparently happily) with their daughter Karen, a graduate student, and their broodin
HOME IS WHERE THE WAR IS America may be reeling from endless recessions and crippling oil wars, but hack reporter Ben Walker never expected to see his homeland invaded and occupied by a reunified Korea—now a formidable world power under Kim Jong-il’s dictator son. The enemy’s massive cyberattack is followed by the detonation of an electromagnetic pulse that destroys technology across the United States. Communications, weapons, and defense systems are rendered useless; thousands perish as vehicles suddenly lose power and passenger jets plummet to the ground. Fleeing the chaos of Los Angeles, Walker discovers that although America’s military has been scattered, its fighting spirit remains. Walker joins the soldiers as they head east across the desert, battling Korean patrols—and soon finds his own mission. Walker reinvents himself as the Voice of Freedom, broadcasting information and enemy positions to civilian Resistance cells via guerrilla radio. But Walker’s broadcasts have also reached the ears of the enemy. Korea dispatches its deadliest warrior to hunt the Voice of Freedom and crush the ever-growing Resistance before it can mount a new war for American liberty. From the Paperback edition.

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