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How Journalism Uses History examines the various ways in which journalism uses history and historical sources in order to better understand the relationships between journalists, historians and journalism scholars. It highlights the ambiguous overlap between the role of the historian and that of the journalist, and underlines that there no longer seems to be reason to accept that one begins only where the other ends. With Journalism Studies as a developing subject area throughout the world, journalism history is becoming a particularly vivacious field. As such, How Journalism Uses History argues that, if historical study of this kind is to achieve its full potential, there needs to be a fuller and more consistent engagement with other academics studying the past: political, social and cultural historians in particular, but also scholars working in politics, sociology, literature and linguistics. Contributors in this book discuss the core themes which inform history’s relationship with journalism from a wide range of geographical and methodological perspectives. They aim to create more ambitious conversations about using journalism both as a source for understanding the past, and for clarifying ideas about its role as constituent of the public sphere in using discourse and tradition to connect contemporary audiences with history. This book was originally published as a special issue of Journalism Practice.
Bringing together new and classic work by Tony Harcup, this book considers the development of alternative journalism from the 1970s up until today. Bringing theory and practice together, Harcup builds an understanding of alternative media through the use of detailed case studies and surveys. Including opinions of journalists who have worked in both mainstream and alternative media, he considers the motivations, practices and roles of alternative journalism as well as delving into ethical considerations. Moving from the history of alternative journalism, Harcup considers the recent spread of 'citizen journalism' and the use of social media, and asks what the role of alternative journalism is today.
Models of Journalism investigates the most fundamental questions of how journalists can best serve the public and what factors enable or obstruct them in doing so. The book evaluates previous scholarly attempts at modeling the function and influencing factors of journalism, and proceeds to develop a range of important new models that take contemporary challenges faced by journalists and journalism into account. Among these new models is the "chronology-of-journalism", which introduces a new set of influencing factors that can affect journalists in the 21st century. These include internal factors – journalistic principles, precedents and practices – and external factors – journalistic production, publication and perception. Another new model, the "journalistic compass", delineates differences and similarities between some of the most important journalistic roles in the media landscape. For each new model, Peter Bro takes the actions and attitudes of individual journalists as its starting point. Models of Journalism combines practice and theory to outline and assess existing theoretical models alongside original ones. The book will be a useful tool for researchers, lecturers and practitioners who are engaged with the ever-evolving notions of what journalism is and who journalists are.
Despite the importance of foreign news, its history, transformation and indeed its future have not been much studied. The scholarly community often calls attention to journalism’s shortcomings covering the world, yet the topic has not been systematically examined across countries or over time. The need to redress this neglect and the desire to assess the impact of new media technologies on the future of journalism – including foreign correspondence – provide the motivation for this stimulating, exciting and thought-provoking book. While the old economic models supporting news have crumbled in the wake of new media technologies, these changes have the potential to bring new and improved ways to inform people of foreign news. In an increasingly globalized era, journalism is being transformed by the effortlessly quick sharing of information across national boundaries. As such, we need to reconsider foreign correspondence and explore where such reporting is headed. This book discusses the current state and future prospects for foreign correspondence across the full range of media platforms, and assesses developments in the reporting of overseas news for audiences, governments and foreign policy in both contemporary and historical settings around the globe. As Emmy Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent Serge Schmemann reminds us in this book, "quality journalism and unbiased reporting are as valid and necessary today as they ever were [...] one of the primary tasks of journalists and scholars as they follow the changes taking place must be to ensure that the ‘new international information order’ now imposed by the Internet remains true to the ideals and traditions that define our journalism." This book was originally published as a special issue of Journalism Studies.
Environmental journalism is an increasingly significant area for study within the broader field of journalism studies. It connects the concerns of politics, science, business, culture and the natural world whilst also exploring the boundaries between the local, regional and global. A central and typical focus for its concerns are the global summits convened to share scientific knowledge about global warming and to formulate policies to mitigate its consequences in particular locales. But reporting environmental change creates difficulties for journalists who are often ill equipped to resolve the uncertainties in the disputed scientific accounts of climate change. This research-based collection focuses on aspects of environmental journalism in Australia, France, Norway, Sweden, the UK and the USA. Contributors present case studies of media reporting of the environment, and explore considerations of objectivity and advocacy in journalistic coverage of the environment and climate change. This book was originally published as a special issue of Journalism Studies.
Almost everyone reads the newspaper, browses the Internet, listens to the radio, or watches TV. Journalism has an indelible effect on our worldview - from the fight against global terrorism to the American presidential elections, celebrity scandal to the latest environmental coups. Hargreaves uses his unique position within the media to examine how we get this information and the many practical, political and professional decisions that the journalist has to make, as part of the processof delivering that information to us. Is journalism the 'first draft of history' or a dumbing-down of our culture and a glorification of the trivial and intrusive? In this intriguing book Ian Hargreaves argues that the core principles of 'freedom of the press' and the necessity of exposing the truth are as vital today as they ever were.
In this vividly written, compelling narrative, award-winning journalist Neil Henry confronts the crisis facing professional journalism in this era of rapid technological transformation. American Carnival combines elements of memoir with extensive media research to explore critical contemporary issues ranging from reporting on the Iraq War, to American race relations, to the exploitation of the image of journalism by advertisers and politicians. Drawing on significant currents in U.S. media and social history, Henry argues that, given the amount of fraud in many institutions in American life today, the decline of journalistic professionalism sparked by the economic challenge of New Media poses especially serious implications for democracy. As increasingly alarming stories surface about unethical practices, American Carnival makes a stirring case for journalism as a calling that is vital to a free society, a profession that is more necessary than ever in a digital age marked by startling assaults on the cultural primacy of truth.

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