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Hypercrime develops a new theoretical approach toward current reformulations in criminal behaviours, in particular the phenomenon of cybercrime. Emphasizing a spatialized conception of deviance, one that clarifies the continuities between crime in the traditional, physical context and developing spaces of interaction such as a 'cyberspace', this book analyzes criminal behaviours in terms of the destructions, degradations or incursions to a hierarchy of regions that define our social world. Each chapter outlines violations to the boundaries of each of these spaces - from those defined by our bodies or our property, to the more subtle borders of the local and global spaces we inhabit. By treating cybercrime as but one instance of various possible criminal virtualities, the book develops a general theoretical framework, as equally applicable to the, as yet unrealized, technologies of criminal behaviour of the next century, as it is to those which relate to contemporary computer networks. Cybercrime is thereby conceptualized as one of a variety of geometries of harm, merely the latest of many that have extended opportunities for illicit gain in the physical world. Hypercrime offers a radical critique of the narrow conceptions of cybercrime offered by current justice systems and challenges the governing presumptions about the nature of the threat posed by it. Runner-up for the British Society of Criminology Book Prize (2008).
While the notion of social harm has long interested critical criminologists it is now being explored as an alternative field of study, which provides more accurate analyses of the vicissitudes of life. However, important aspects of this notion remain undeveloped, in particular the definition of social harm, the question of responsibility and the methodologies for studying harm. This book, the first to theorise and define the social harm concept beyond criminology, seeks to address these omissions and questions why some capitalist societies appear to be more harmful than others. In doing so it provides a platform for future debates, in this series and beyond. It will be a valuable resource for academics and researchers across criminology, sociology, social policy, socio-legal studies and geography.
This book maintains that chronic poverty is a significant issue in India which needs to be addressed by policy makers. The book focuses on the nature and politics of chronic poverty in India, and provides an analysis of poverty reduction policies from a chronic poverty perspective. The papers bring together new research, based on original and secondary data, to demonstrate that a significant portion of India’s population is chronically poor.
The complex world of online piracy and peer-to-peer file sharing is skillfully condensed into an easy-to-understand guide that provides insight into the criminal justice approach to illegal file sharing, while offering guidance to parents and students who have concerns about potential legal action in response to file-sharing activities.
Organized into a two-part structure aimed at readers of differing experience levels, Geometry of Crystals, Polycrystals, and Phase Transformations is accessible to both newcomers and advanced researchers within the field of crystallography. The first part of the text covers what any reader in the material sciences, physics, chemistry, earth sciences and natural sciences in general should know about crystallography. It is intentionally concise and covers sufficient material to form a firm foundation. The second part is aimed at researchers and discusses phase transformations, deformations, and interface crystallography in depth. The phase transformations are limited to those dominated by crystallography. The entire book contains worked examples and uniquely deals not just with crystals but aggregates of crystals and solid-state transformations between crystals.
When James Dallas Egbert III disappeared from the Michigan State University campus in 1979, he was no ordinary college dropout. Egbert was a computer genius at sixteen, a boy with an I.Q. of 180-plus and an extravagant imagination. He was a fanatic Dungeons & Dragons player—before the game was widely known—and he and his friends played a live version in a weird labyrinth of tunnels and rooms beneath the university. These secret passages even ran within the walls of the buildings themselves. After Egbert disappeared, there were rumors of witch cults, drug rings, and homosexuality to try to explain the mystery. When the police search came to a dead end, the Egbert family called in one of the most colorful private investigators of our era, William Dear, of Dallas, who is a kind of real-life James Bond. Dear's search for the boy reads like a sensational novel—but every detail is true. Dear crawled through baking-hot tunnels, flew over the campus in a helicopter, and called into play every intuition he could muster. He realized that he must out-play and "out-psych" the brilliant, game-playing mind of Dallas Egbert. In the end, he did. The story of the tortuous search, the discovery of the boy, his return to his parents—and the final tragedy—is told here for the first time. This is the story of a generation, not just the story of Dallas Egbert alone; and anybody who has known a game-playing, computer-age adolescent will recognize some of the possibilities for genius, and for danger.

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