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Improving Computer Science Education examines suitable theoretical frameworks for conceptualizing teaching and learning computer science. This highly useful book provides numerous examples of practical, "real world" applications of major computer science information topics, such as: * Spreadsheets * Databases * Programming Each chapter concludes with a section that summarzies recommendations for teacher professional development. Traditionally, computer science education has been skills-focused and disconnected from the reality students face after they leave the classroom. Improving Computer Science Education makes the subject matter useful and meaningful by connecting it explicitly to students' everyday lives.
The first year of our three-year grant was designed to enable Woodrow Wilson Senior High School to acquire technological innovations so that our instructional staff could spend less time preparing learning materials and more time promoting student learning. We requested funds to obtain two major innovations: a photocopy machine and a computer network. During this first funding cycle, these innovations have been acquired. We are already seeing positive changes as a result. This report discusses these innovations.
In response to concerns about the continued unrealized potential of IT in K-12 education, the National Research CouncilÂ’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, Center for Education (CFE), Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences (BBCSS), and Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) undertook a collaborative project to help the IT, education research, and practitioner communities work together to find ways of improving the use of IT in K-12 education for the benefit of all students.
This textbook presents both a conceptual framework and detailed implementation guidelines for computer science (CS) teaching. Updated with the latest teaching approaches and trends, and expanded with new learning activities, the content of this new edition is clearly written and structured to be applicable to all levels of CS education and for any teaching organization. Features: provides 110 detailed learning activities; reviews curriculum and cross-curriculum topics in CS; explores the benefits of CS education research; describes strategies for cultivating problem-solving skills, for assessing learning processes, and for dealing with pupils’ misunderstandings; proposes active-learning-based classroom teaching methods, including lab-based teaching; discusses various types of questions that a CS instructor or trainer can use for a range of teaching situations; investigates thoroughly issues of lesson planning and course design; examines the first field teaching experiences gained by CS teachers.
In spring 2000, representatives from the U.S. Department of Education (DOEd) and senior staff at the National Research Council (NRC) recognized a common frustration: that the potential of information technology to transform K-12 education remains unrealized. In fall 2000 the U.S. DOEd formally requested that the National Academies undertake an interdisciplinary project called Improving Learning with Information Technology (ILIT). The project was launched with a symposium on January 24-25, 2001. This report summarizes the proceedings of the symposium and is intended for people interested in considering better strategies for using information technology in the educational arena. While it offers insights from the presenters on both the challenges to and the opportunities for forging a better dialogue among learning scientists, technologists, and educators, it does not contain conclusions or recommendations. Rather, it highlights issues to consider, constituents to engage, and strategies to employ in the effort to build a coalition to harness the power of information technologies for the improvement of American education. Every effort has been made to convey the speakers' content and viewpoints accurately. Recognizing the speculative nature of many of the speaker contributions, most attributions identify a speaker by area of expertise rather than by name. The report reflects the proceedings of the workshop and is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all the issues involved in the project to improve learning with information technology.
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