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The years after the Civil War were marked by bitter political fights betwen the Democrats and Radical Republicans over how to reunite the country, and a deeply divided group of newspapers shouting down their opponents. All claimed to be acting on behalf of the better angels of our nature that Lincoln said should guide us as a people. Meanwhile, Washington was flooded with lobbyists spreading cash to buy influence and votes, and America's West was being opened by the construction of the transcontinental railroad. As a reporter for a Philadelphia newspaper, Benjamin Wright has a front-row seat to this period of transition in our history. He not only covers the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, which was sparked by disagreements over how to bring the Confederate states back to the Union, but then initiates investigation into the massive theft of government monies by the company building the railroad. His reporting both puts Benjamin into the middle of Horace Greeley's 1872 Presidential campaign and makes him the principal voice covering the Congressional hearings into what became known as the Credit Mobilier scandal. As dizzying as these experiences are, however, they come at an enormous personal cost. And, like so many of us who today are fed up with the intransigence of our elected officials and the media's relentless fanning of the partisan flames, Benjamin's disappointment with both the government and the newspaper business escalates the more closely he witnesses Washington's corrupt soul and the bias of the press.
The year is 1867, the South has been defeated, and the American Civil War is over. But the conflict goes on. Yankees now patrol the streets of Richmond, Virginia, and its citizens, both black and white, are struggling to redefine their roles and relationships. By day, fourteen-year-old Shadrach apprentices with a tailor and sneaks off for reading lessons with Rachel, a freed slave, at her school for African-American children. By night he follows his older brother Jeremiah to the meetings of a group whose stated mission is to protect Confederate widows like their mother. But as the true murderous intentions of the group, now known as the Ku Klux Klan, are revealed, Shad finds himself trapped between old loyalties and what he knows is right. In this powerful and unflinching story of a family caught in the period of Reconstruction, A.B. Westrick provides a glimpse into the enormous social and political upheaval of the time.
A 50th anniversary edition of Margaret Walker's best-selling classic with a foreword by Nikki Giovanni “Chronicles the triumph of a free spirit over many kinds of bondage.” —New York Times Book Review Jubilee tells the true story of Vyry, the child of a white plantation owner and his black mistress. Vyry bears witness to the South’s antebellum opulence and to its brutality, its wartime ruin, and the promises of Reconstruction. Weaving her own family’s oral history with thirty years of research, Margaret Walker’s novel brings the everyday experiences of slaves to light. Jubilee churns with the hunger, the hymns, the struggles, and the very breath of American history.
Newly Reissued with a New Introduction: From the "preeminent historian of Reconstruction" (New York Times Book Review), a newly updated edition of the prize-winning classic work on the post-Civil War period which shaped modern America. Eric Foner's "masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history" (New Republic) redefined how the post-Civil War period was viewed. Reconstruction chronicles the way in which Americans—black and white—responded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery. It addresses the ways in which the emancipated slaves' quest for economic autonomy and equal citizenship shaped the political agenda of Reconstruction; the remodeling of Southern society and the place of planters, merchants, and small farmers within it; the evolution of racial attitudes and patterns of race relations; and the emergence of a national state possessing vastly expanded authority and committed, for a time, to the principle of equal rights for all Americans. This "smart book of enormous strengths" (Boston Globe) remains the standard work on the wrenching post-Civil War period—an era whose legacy still reverberates in the United States today.
An epic account of one remarkable woman's quest for justice from the New York Times bestselling author of The Widow of the South and A Separate Country. In the years following the Civil War, Mariah Reddick, former slave to Carrie McGavock--the "Widow of the South"--has quietly built a new life for herself as a midwife to the women of Franklin, Tennessee. But when her ambitious, politically minded grown son, Theopolis, is murdered, Mariah--no stranger to loss--finds her world once more breaking apart. How could this happen? Who wanted him dead? Mariah's journey to uncover the truth leads her to unexpected people--including George Tole, a recent arrival to town, fleeing a difficult past of his own--and forces her to confront the truths of her own past. Brimming with the vivid prose and historical research that has won Robert Hicks recognition as a "master storyteller" (San Francisco Chronicle).
This clear and engaging book offers readers an introduction to European Literary History from antiquity through to the present day. Each chapter discusses a short extract from a literary text, whilst including a close reading and a longer essay examining other key texts of the period and their place within European Literature. Offering a view of Europe as an evolving cultural space and examining the mobility and travel of literature both within and out of Europe, this guide offers an introduction to the dynamics of major literary networks, international literary networks, publication cultures and debates, and the cultural history of 'Europe' as a region as well as a concept.
A New York Times Notable Book: A “stirring” and “eye-opening” history of the Reconstruction era’s forgotten heroes from the award-winning author (The New York Times Book Review). The years following the Civil War were some of the most progressive and precarious in United States history. Under the terms of congressional Reconstruction, newly emancipated African American men began to vote—and win elections. But the more power they gained, the more bitter and violent a backlash they faced. In this compelling history, Pulitzer Prize finalist Philip Dray shines a light on the first black members of Congress. We meet men like Hiram Revels of Mississippi, who in 1870 took the congressional seat once held by Jefferson Davis; Robert Smalls of South Carolina, the Civil War hero who had stolen a Confederate vessel and delivered it to the Union navy; and Robert Brown Elliott, who bested the former Confederate vice president in a stormy debate on the House floor. Often neglected by standard histories of the period, these individuals—some of whom were formerly enslaved—played a critical role in the fight for public education, equal rights, land distribution, and more. Drawing on archival documents, contemporary newspaper coverage, and congressional records, Dray covers the fraught period between the Emancipation Proclamation and Jim Crow, following these trailblazing politicians in their effort to realize the promise of a new nation. “Dray casts fresh light on the positive aspects of Reconstruction and powerfully dramatizes its negative side. His well-researched book is both exhilarating and disturbing.” —The New York Times Book Review “Capitol Men is an excellent choice for both newcomers to the Reconstruction saga and those already informed about the period.” —Atlanta Journal-Constitution “Dray is an engaging writer with an eye for the dramatic incident and an ability to draw out its broader significance and relevance to our own times.” —The Nation

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