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This is the fourth edition of what is the leading practitioner's text on freedom of information law. Providing in-depth legal analysis and practical guidance, it offers complete, authoritative coverage for anyone either making, handling or adjudicating upon requests for official information. The three years since the previous edition have seen numerous important decisions from the courts and tribunals in the area. These and earlier authorities supply the basis for clear statements of principle, which the work supports by reference to all relevant cases. The book is logically organised so that the practitioner can quickly locate the relevant text. It commences with an historical analysis that sets out the object of the legislation and its relationship with other aspects of public law. Full references to Hansard and other Parliamentary materials are provided. This is followed by a summary of the regime in five other jurisdictions, providing comparative jurisprudence which can assist in resolving undecided points. The potential of the Human Rights Act 1998 to support rights of access is dealt with in some detail, with reference to all ECHR cases. Next follows a series of chapters dealing with rights of access under other legislative regimes, covering information held by EU bodies, requests under the Data Protection Act and the Environmental Information Regulations, public records, as well as type-specific rights of access. These introduce the practitioner to useful rights of access that might otherwise be overlooked. They are arranged thematically to ensure ready identification of potentially relevant ones. The book then considers practical aspects of information requests: the persons who may make them; the bodies to whom they may be made; the time allowed for responding; the modes of response; fees and vexatious requests; the duty to advise and assist; the codes of practice; government guidance and its status; transferring of requests; third party consultation. The next 13 chapters, comprising over half the book, are devoted to exemptions. These start with two important chapters dealing with general exemption principles, including the notions of 'prejudice' and the 'public interest'. The arrangement of these chapters reflects the arrangement of the FOI Act, but the text is careful to include analogous references to the Environmental Information Regulations and the Data Protection Act 1998. With each chapter, the exemption is carefully analysed, starting with its Parliamentary history (giving full references to Hansard and other Parliamentary material) and the treatment given in the comparative jurisdictions. The analysis then turns to consider all court judgments and tribunal decisions dealing with the exemption. The principles are stated in the text, with footnotes giving all available references. Whether to prepare a case or to prepare a response to a request, these chapters allow the practitioner to get on top of the exemption rapidly and authoritatively. The book concludes with three chapters setting out the role of the Information Commissioner and the Tribunal, appeals and enforcement. The chapter on appeals allows the practitioner to be familiar with the processes followed in the tribunal, picking up on the jurisprudence as it has emerged in the last eight or so years. Appendices include: precedent requests for information; a step-by-step guide to responding to a request; comparative tables; and a table of the FOI Act's Parliamentary history. Finally, the book includes an annotated copy of the FOIA Act, the Data Protection Act 1998, the Environmental Information Regulations 2004, all subordinate legislation made under them, EU legislation, Tribunal rules and practice directions, and the Codes of Practice.ContributorsProf John Angel, former President of the Information TribunalRichard Clayton QC, 4-5 Gray's Inn SquareJoanne Clement, 11 KBWGerry Facena, Monkton ChambersEleanor Gray QC
"This indispensable guide is a one-stop shop for all you need to know about information rights law, using relevant case studies to clarify and illuminate these tricky issues Contents include. Data Protection Act 1998; definitions of personal data; scope of the Act; the principles; access to personal data and data sharing; Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004: scope of the Acts; applications of exemptions/exceptions; public interest tests; publication schemes; disclosure logs and records managements; Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000; Human Rights Act 1998; Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2005; other non information rights related legislation; interaction of legislation; and requests for information."--BOOK JACKET.
Human rights law is a complex but compelling subject that fascinates, but often confuses, students. International Human Rights Law and Practice explores the subject from a theoretical and practical perspective, guiding students to a rich understanding of the law. The second edition has been fully revised and updated, including two new chapters on children's rights and international criminal law, and new sections on a variety of topics, including the right to equality, the protection of refugees and the effect of foreign investment and sovereign debt on the enjoyment of human rights. In addition, new case studies and interviews with practitioners, NGO activists and policymakers show how theory is applied in real life. Student learning is supported by questions to stimulate seminar discussion and further reading sections that encourage independent study. The authors' clear and engaging writing style ensures that this new edition will continue to be required reading for all students of human rights law.
Public participation has become a recurring theme and a topical issue in the field of international environmental law, with many multilateral environmental instruments calling on states to guarantee effectively the concept in their laws and practices. This book focuses on public participation in environmental governance, in terms of public access to environmental information and public participation in environmental decision-making processes. Drawing on the body of international best practice principles in environmental law and taking a comparative stance, Uzuazo Etemire takes Nigeria as a key case, evaluating its procedural laws and practices in relation to public access to information and participation in decision-making in environmental matters. In working to clarify and deepen understanding of the current status of environmental public participation rights in Nigeria, the book addresses key issues in environmental governance for developing and transitional countries and the potential for public participation to improve the state of the environment and public wellbeing. This book will be of great interest to undergraduate students (as further reading) and post-graduate students, academics, researchers, relevant government agencies and departments, policy-makers and NGOs in the fields of international environmental law, environmental justice, environmental/natural resource management, development studies and international finance.
The book, written with a rich teaching and research experience of the author, emphasises the critical evaluation of contemporary human rights law and practice with special reference to India. It also evaluates the ongoing discourse on various issues relating to life, liberty, equality and human dignity and their reflections in international human rights law referring the state practices through constitutional guarantees, judicial decisions as well as through enacting appropriate legislations. This lucid and comprehensive book is logically organised into nine chapters. Beginning with the theoretical foundations of human rights law referring to origin, development and theories of human rights at preliminary level, the book proceeds to “International Bill of Human Rights” demonstrating various facets of civil and political rights as well as economic, social and cultural rights. It further discusses the importance of human rights law in protection against inhuman wrongs and examines a large number of debates concerning human right to development and protection of environment. Then, it moves on to explore various issues relating to human rights in Indian Constitutional Law. The latter part of the book emphasises on the protection of rights of women and children, which has been the focal point of all human rights discussions. It also deals with the scope and ambit of the rights of indigenous peoples and minorities including their protection. At the end, the book examines the utility and justifications of human rights law in protecting the rights of people with disabilities (divyang).Though the book is primarily designed for LLB, BA LLB and LLM and courses on human rights, it will be equally beneficial for the researchers, academicians, jurists, lawyers, judges as well as members of civil society.
This practical new handbook provides a clear explanation of how the law regulates the sharing of information.
This third edition of Lester, Pannick and Herberg: Human Rights Law and Practice has been substantially re-written to take account of the major changes which have occurred in this area of the law. It includes not only a summary of European and UK human rights law but also wider international and comparative case law. It places this subject within its wider parliamentary context and connects with other jurisdictions.Up-to-date as of March 2009 to include the very latest cases, such as the judgment of the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights in A v United Kingdom (finding that the United Kingdom was in breach of the Convention by detaining terrorist suspects without trial in Belmarsh Prison); judgment of the Court of Appeal in Purdy v DPP (how Convention rights apply in the context of a possible criminal prosecution of a man who assists his seriously ill wife to travel to Switzerland to commit suicide); and the House of Lords' judgment in RB (Algeria) v SSHD (considering risk of Art 3 ill-treatment on return and the return state's assurances, and Art 6 in connection with the removed person's right to a fair trial).Issues arising under the Human Rights Act, such as freedom of expression, conscience and belief, freedom of assembly and fair trial receive comprehensive treatment within the text. International Human Rights codes and comparative human rights law elsewhere in the Commonwealth, Ireland and the United States are also discussed. With specific chapters analysing the political history and the role of parliament in its conception and enforcement, this practical book covers all the information you need to interpret the Human Rights Act 1998 and this complicated area of law.Includes coverage on the UK government's Green Paper, Rights and Responsibilities: Developing Our Constitutional Framework.

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