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Intellectual Property Stories assembles 15 nationally-recognized full-time members of the intellectual property professorate to bring famous cases to life by exploring the history, policy, and human interests underlying the canonical cases in the field. The stories are organized into six chapters, each drawing on cases in patents, copyrights, trademarks, or unfair competition, to illustrate the problems intellectual property law encounters. The works, inventions, and marks at issue in these cases vary widely. Many of the stories illustrate more than the issue identified in the chapter title. Thus, it is possible to confine one's reading to an individual intellectual property regime, and still encounter most of the issues common to the whole field. However, each of the stories is written in a manner that will interest and instruct intellectual property students and scholars across the breadth of the field, without requiring particular knowledge of any of its specialized branches.
Jim Davis, through stories of his remarkable career as U.S. Naval officer, international trial lawyer and Federal trial judge, provides rare insight and humor to exotic happenings on the high seas and in America’s courtrooms. All stems from his improbable youthful achievements . . . appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy faculty at age 23 and to the Federal bench in Washington, D.C. at age 32, youngest ever to the U.S. Court of Claims. He tells of chasing Soviet nuclear submarines from New York to the North Sea, learning the Navy’s ways while working with fellow-officer Ross Perot (America’s computer wunderkind in the late 1950s), navigating the St. Lawrence seaway in 1957 on an aircraft carrier, the first and largest ship to do so, and entering Havana, Cuba in 1957 under threat of Castro’s expanding revolution. In the courtroom, he tangled with the CIA over recovery of a Soviet submarine from the Pacific Ocean floor, prevented China from exporting illegally millions of TV sets to the U.S. after stealing U.S. patents, protected Texas Instruments’ multi-billion dollar position in computer chip production from invasion by Japan and Korea, and thwarted piracy by Mexican and Chinese pirates of National Geographic Society’s world famous yellow-bordered Geographic magazine. As trial judge, he decided a $211 million patent case, second largest in U.S. history, and decided what Time Magazine called the “most significant copyright case of the 20th century,” copyright’s struggle with the Xerox machine. And much more. A great read!
There are two oppositional narratives in relation to telling the story of indigenous peoples and minorities in relation to globalization and intellectual property rights. The first, the narrative of Optimism, is a story of the triumphant opening of brave new worlds of commercial integration and cultural inclusion. The second, the narrative of Fear, is a story of the endangerment, mourning, and loss of a traditional culture. While the story of Optimism deploys a rhetoric of commercial mobilization and “innovation,” the story of Fear emphasizes the rhetoric of preserving something “pure” and “traditional” that is “dying.” Both narratives have compelling rhetorical force, and actually need each other, in order to move their opposing audiences into action. However, as Picart shows, the realities behind these rhetorically framed political parables are more complex than a simple binary. Hence, the book steers a careful path between hope rather than unbounded Optimism, and caution, rather than Fear, in exploring how law functions in and as culture as it contours the landscape of intellectual property rights, as experienced by indigenous peoples and minorities. Picart uses, among a variety of tools derived from law, critical and cultural studies, anthropology and communication, case studies to illustrate this approach. She tracks the fascinating stories of the controversies surrounding the ownership of a Taiwanese folk song; the struggle over control of the Mapuche’s traditional land in Chile against the backdrop of Chile’s drive towards modernization; the collaboration between the Kani tribe in India and a multinational corporation to patent an anti-fatigue chemical agent; the drive for respect and recognition by Australian Aboriginal artists for their visual expressions of folklore; and the challenges American women of color such as Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham faced in relation to the evolving issues of choreography, improvisation and copyright. The book also analyzes the cultural conflicts that result from these encounters between indigenous populations or minorities and majority groups, reflects upon the ways in which these conflicts were negotiated or resolved, both nationally and internationally, and carefully explores proposals to mediate such conflicts.
The present state of copyright law and the way in which it threatens the remix of culture and creativity is a shared concern of the contributors to this unique book. Whether or not to remain within the underlying regime of intellectual property law, and what sort of reforms are needed if we do decide to remain within this regime, are fundamental questions that form the subtext for their discussions. - Publisher.
As knowledge production has become a more salient part of the economy, intellectual property laws have expanded. From a backwater of specialists in patent, copyright, and trademark law, intellectual property has become linked to trade through successive international agreements, and appreciated as a key to both economic and cultural development. Furthermore, law has begun to engage the interest of economists, political theorists, and human rights advocates. But because each discipline sees intellectual property in its own way, legal scholarship and practice have diverged, and the debate over intellectual property law has become fragmented. This book is aimed at bringing this diverse scholarship and practice together. It examines intellectual property through successive lenses (incentive theory, trade, development, culture, and human rights) and ends with a discussion of whether and how these fragmented views can be reconciled and integrated.
FFM to the South Pacific
Keeping up with the fast pace of change in Intellectual Property, the third edition of Examples & Explanations: Intellectual Property offers timely coverage of central concepts in the proven-effective Examples & Explanations format. Student-friendly, concise, and timely, Examples & Explanations: Intellectual Property features: complete coverage keyed to the leading IP casebooks for the survey course proven-effective Examples & Explanations pedagogy that fills in any gaps in students' understanding of casebook assignments consistent emphasis on central concepts, without digressing into more advanced topics free-standing chapters that are easily adapted to any course structure and make this study guide useful to as a reference throughout the semester Key Concepts and Policy Issues highlighted in each chapter Updated throughout, the Third Edition includes: new developments effecting Internet service providers new material on patents, including landmark Supreme Court cases (on first sale, injunctions, patentable subject matter, licensing, declaratory judgments, nonobviousness, infringement abroad, and experimental use) and key Federal Circuit cases minimum statutory damages for downloading music originality--copyright in forms, digital images of public domain works DMCA anticurcumvention provisions new exemptions cases protecting legitimate uses of copyright protected works First Amendment limits on Congress' power to expand copyright protection international issues, such as copyright restoration for foreign works, and scope of protection abroad for US works copyright protection for databases, software, and orphan works consumers licensing, such as click-through copyright licenses and arbitration clauses new material on fair use thumbnail images in search engines Google Book case Turnitin, on-line plagiarism protection Public records in private databases Legal documents new cases on audio books, sampling, and data use restrictions new material on patents, including landmark Supreme Court cases and key Federal Circuit cases new material on trademark Trademark Dilution Revision Act use of trademarks as keywords in search engine advertising unauthorized use of trademarks in video games and films cases on likelihood of confusion standard, scope of international protection, functionality of trade dress, and fair use of trademarks new material on trade secret, such as remedies, reverse engineering, and government use of trade secret information new material on state intellectual property law, such as First Amendment limits on right of publicity; unjust enrichment and Intellectual Property law; scope of employee invention assignment agreements; preemption by federal law Intellectual Property is a big field and continually in the throes of change. Stephen M. McJohn keeps his coverage focused and current in Examples & Explanations: Intellectual Property, Third Edition. for a complete, concise, and clear introduction to central IP concepts, trust the proven-effective Examples & Explanations methodology to convey Intellectual Property concepts to your students.

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