Download Free Into Your Meditation Metaphors On Essential Elements Of A Meditation Practice Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Into Your Meditation Metaphors On Essential Elements Of A Meditation Practice and write the review.

he key pillars of a meditation practice can daunt even the most practiced spiritual traveler. In Into Your Meditation, author Noëlle Vignola explores these pillars through the playful use of metaphor and storytelling. A life coach and social worker, Vignola breaks down a series of daily, bite-sized meditations. Arranged in thematic sections of seed, root, stem, branch, leaf, bloom, and fruit, each piece is designed to be brief and read before or after a sit. The selections can be read in any sequence and each stands alone as a practice piece. Lovingly prepared for any spiritual traveler, the meditations offer food for thought to carry with you, not only in your sit, but throughout the day. Some will immediately resonate with you, while others may not. Take what serves you and feel free to leave the rest.
What does it mean to become and work as an artist today? What unique challenges do artists face in the twenty-first century, and what skills are required to overcome them? How might art become an expression of spiritual life? In addressing these and other questions, Deborah J. Haynes offers reflections that range from the practical to the deeply philosophical. She explores challenging ideas: impermanence, suffering, and the inevitability of death; the virtues of generosity, kindness, and compassion; and more abstract concepts such as negative capability, groundlessness, and wisdom. Individual chapters are framed by personal stories and images from the artist’s work. Beginning Again: Reflections on Art as Spiritual Practice is a personal statement, born from the author’s experience as an artist, writer, teacher, and Buddhist practitioner. Haynes writes for artists—and for all exploring the relationship of their creativity to the inner life. For Haynes, making and looking at art can be a form of meditation and prayer, a space for solitude, silence, and living in the present.
How can the group setting be used to treat those with drug and alcohol problems? Many professionals working across a variety of addictions settings find themselves working in groups and tackling complex issues; however, there is often very little initial training or on-the-job support to help them in this challenging task. Principles and Practice of Group Work in Addictions has been written with the aim of addressing the key areas in working with drug and alcohol misuse while providing practical solutions to the more common problems that emerge in group work. Drawing on the expertise of clinicians who work in the field of addictions, this book offers readers practical advice for everyday practice. Divided into three sections it covers: core group work in addictions practical issues and solutions to common problems specific issues within the field of addictions. Principles and Practice of Group Work in Addictions is illustrated throughout with practical case examples, providing the reader with an insight into group work in this area. The book will supply guidance for mental health professionals including clinicians, psychologists, nurses and medical staff who encounter group work in addictions for the first time, as well as providing further knowledge and support to those who already work in the field.
What is religion? How does it work? Many natural abilities of the human mind are involved, and crucial among them is the ability to use language. This volume brings together research from linguistics, cognitive science and neuroscience, as well as from religious studies, to understand the phenomena of religion as a distinctly human enterprise. The book is divided into three parts, each part preceded by a full introductory chapter by the editors that discusses modern scientific approaches to religion and the application of modern linguistics, particularly cognitive linguistics and pragmatics. Part I surveys the development of modern studies of religious language and the diverse disciplinary strands that have emerged. Beginning with descriptive approaches to religious language and the problem of describing religious concepts across languages, chapters introduce the turn to cognition in linguistics and also in theology, and explore the brain's contrasting capacities, in particular its capacity for language and metaphor. Part II continues the discussion of metaphor - the natural ability by which humans draw on basic knowledge of the world in order to explore abstractions and intangibles. Specialists in particular religions apply conceptual metaphor theory in various ways, covering several major religious traditions-Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam and Judaism. Part III seeks to open up new horizons for cognitive-linguistic research on religion, looking beyond written texts to the ways in which language is integrated with other modalities, including ritual, religious art, and religious electronic media. Chapters in Part III introduce readers to a range of technical instruments that have been developed within cognitive linguistics and discourse analysis in recent years. What unfolds ultimately is the idea that the embodied cognition of humans is the basis not only of their languages, but also of their religions.
"Meditation from Buddhist, Hindu, and Taoist Perspectives" engages readers with its original philosophical and pragmatic analysis of traditional Asian religions, philosophy, meditation practice, and the supreme spiritual ideals associated with the Hindu, Buddhist, and Taoist traditions. The text boldly bridges the theory/practice distinction. A central underpinning of "Meditation from Buddhist, Hindu, and Taoist Perspectives" rests on the assumption that meditation practice without theory is groundless and that theory without practice is useless. Robert Altobello identifies and analyzes common elements found across traditions in which the practice of meditation plays a central role in human development, and readers will find a wealth of detailed reflection on the relationship between spiritual growth and meditation practice from the Hindu, Buddhist, and Taoist perspectives. In the spirit of these traditions, the exploration of meditation practice requires examination of the principal elements that sustain the core worldviews as well as the metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical presumptions that animate these traditions. Throughout the text, the author demonstrates why these philosophies are all best understood as psychologies of happiness and/or contentment and that by viewing them as such, practitioners can reap the great promises of all these traditions without the need to accept any compromising metaphysical assumptions.
Meditation is a simple and practical activity that can enrich our lives and work in innumerable ways. It allows us to connect more deeply to ourselves and others and to the environment. In this book, John P. Miller, an expert in the field of holistic education, looks at mediation and how it can be integrated into one’s work and daily life. Twenty years after it was first published, Miller’s book remains one of the best guides to applying contemplative practice, covering a variety of theoretical, empirical, historical, and cross-cultural approaches. For this new edition, Miller has updated the text to reflect the growth of the mindfulness movement, new research into the brain, and his years of experience teaching and practising contemplation in teacher education. Whether one is interested in exploring how meditation can be used in the classroom or the workplace, or simply seeking to integrate it into one’s personal life, The Contemplative Practitioner is the perfect companion.
The book makes an significant contribution to comparative theology, and explores the wide-ranging implications of a religious symbol whose potency is perennial, cross-cultural, and of continuing contemporary importance.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact