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Developed from lecture notes and ready to be used for a course on the graduate level, this concise text aims to introduce the fundamental concepts of nonparametric estimation theory while maintaining the exposition suitable for a first approach in the field.
This book introduces basic concepts of shape constrained inference and guides the reader to current developments in the subject.
The aim of this volume is to provide an extensive account of the most recent advances in statistics for discretely observed Lévy processes. These days, statistics for stochastic processes is a lively topic, driven by the needs of various fields of application, such as finance, the biosciences, and telecommunication. The three chapters of this volume are completely dedicated to the estimation of Lévy processes, and are written by experts in the field. The first chapter by Denis Belomestny and Markus Reiß treats the low frequency situation, and estimation methods are based on the empirical characteristic function. The second chapter by Fabienne Comte and Valery Genon-Catalon is dedicated to non-parametric estimation mainly covering the high-frequency data case. A distinctive feature of this part is the construction of adaptive estimators, based on deconvolution or projection or kernel methods. The last chapter by Hiroki Masuda considers the parametric situation. The chapters cover the main aspects of the estimation of discretely observed Lévy processes, when the observation scheme is regular, from an up-to-date viewpoint.
This volume collects selected papers from the 7th High Dimensional Probability meeting held at the Institut d'Études Scientifiques de Cargèse (IESC) in Corsica, France. High Dimensional Probability (HDP) is an area of mathematics that includes the study of probability distributions and limit theorems in infinite-dimensional spaces such as Hilbert spaces and Banach spaces. The most remarkable feature of this area is that it has resulted in the creation of powerful new tools and perspectives, whose range of application has led to interactions with other subfields of mathematics, statistics, and computer science. These include random matrices, nonparametric statistics, empirical processes, statistical learning theory, concentration of measure phenomena, strong and weak approximations, functional estimation, combinatorial optimization, and random graphs. The contributions in this volume show that HDP theory continues to thrive and develop new tools, methods, techniques and perspectives to analyze random phenomena.
This book gives a systematic, comprehensive, and unified account of modern nonparametric statistics of density estimation, nonparametric regression, filtering signals, and time series analysis. The companion software package, available over the Internet, brings all of the discussed topics into the realm of interactive research. Virtually every claim and development mentioned in the book is illustrated with graphs which are available for the reader to reproduce and modify, making the material fully transparent and allowing for complete interactivity.
Readers will find that, refreshingly, this text presents in a vivid yet concise style the necessary statistical and mathematical background for financial engineers. The focus is both on fundamentals of mathematical finance and financial time series analysis and on applications to given problems of financial markets, making the book the ideal basis for lectures, seminars and crash courses on the topic. For the second edition the book has been updated and extensively revised. Several new topics have been included, such as a chapter on credit risk management.
Standard methods for estimating empirical models in economics and many other fields rely on strong assumptions about functional forms and the distributions of unobserved random variables. Often, it is assumed that functions of interest are linear or that unobserved random variables are normally distributed. Such assumptions simplify estimation and statistical inference but are rarely justified by economic theory or other a priori considerations. Inference based on convenient but incorrect assumptions about functional forms and distributions can be highly misleading. Nonparametric and semiparametric statistical methods provide a way to reduce the strength of the assumptions required for estimation and inference, thereby reducing the opportunities for obtaining misleading results. These methods are applicable to a wide variety of estimation problems in empirical economics and other fields, and they are being used in applied research with increasing frequency. The literature on nonparametric and semiparametric estimation is large and highly technical. This book presents the main ideas underlying a variety of nonparametric and semiparametric methods. It is accessible to graduate students and applied researchers who are familiar with econometric and statistical theory at the level taught in graduate-level courses in leading universities. The book emphasizes ideas instead of technical details and provides as intuitive an exposition as possible. Empirical examples illustrate the methods that are presented. This book updates and greatly expands the author’s previous book on semiparametric methods in econometrics. Nearly half of the material is new.

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