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Assessing the relative importance of British influence and of indigenous impulses in shaping an independent Ireland, this book identifies the relationship between personality and process in determining Irish history.
The history of modern Ireland has been one of both struggle and hope. The struggle, first to establish a nation independent of Britain and then to define what it represents, is one that continues to animate politics and society at home as well as abroad among the Irish Diaspora (especially in the USA). Though it is a struggle that still bears the traces of sectarianism, this is leavened by the ongoing hopes-both north and south of the border-of a lasting settlement in Ulster. Charting those large, iconic moments of the Irish narrative, award-winning historian J J Lee sets such momentous events as the founding of the Fenians (1858), C S Parnell's campaign for Home Rule (from 1877), the Easter Rising (1916), occupation of the Dublin Custom House (1921), the death of Michael Collins (1922) and the rise of �amon de Valera against the surging tides of stronger currents: whether the Great Famine, the War of Independence or the bitter Civil War between pro-and anti-treaty factions of the IRA. By revealing the underlying forces beneath Ireland's turbulent history, Lee here offers a masterful portrait of the Irish story.
Politics in the Republic of Ireland is now available in a fully revised fourth edition. Building on the success of the previous three editions, this text continues to provide an authoritative introduction to all aspects of politics in the Republic of Ireland. Written by some of the foremost experts on Irish politics, it explains, analyzes and interprets the background to Irish government and contemporary political processes. Crucially, it brings the student up-to-date with the very latest developments. New patterns of government formation, challenges to the established political parties, ever-deepening, if sometimes ambivalent, involvement in the process of European integration, a growing role in the politics of Northern Ireland and sustained discussion of gender issues are among these developments – along with evidence, revealed by several tribunals of enquiry, that Irish politics is not as free of corruption as many had assumed.
'The Modernisation of Irish Society' surveys the period from the end of the Famine to the triumph of Sinn Fein in the 1918 election and argues that during that time Ireland became one of the most modern and advanced political cultures in the world. Professor Lee contends that the Famine death-rate, however terrible, was not unprecedented. What was different was the post-Famine response to the catastrophy. The sharply increased rate of emigration left behind a population of tenent farmers engaged in market orientated agriculture and determined to protect and improve their position. It was this group that used the British political system so skillfully, a process elaborated and refined in the Land League and Home Rule movements under Parnell. The Parnell era left a lasting legacy of modern political engagement and organisation which was carried on in essentials by the later Home Rule party and by Sinn Fein, and - beyond the terminal date of the book - would make its mark on the politics of independent Ireland. 'The Modernisation of Irish Society' was first published as volume 10 of the original Gill History of Ireland.
Drawing on interviews with key players and previously unused archival sources, this book offers a fascinating account of a critical period in Fine Gael's history when the party was challenged to define its place in Irish politics.
This book is the first sustained attempt to incorporate critical scholarship and thought at the cutting edge of contemporary geography, history and archaeology into the burgeoning field of Irish heritage studies. It seeks to illustrate the validity of multiple depictions of the Irish past, showing how scrutiny of heritage practices and meanings is so essential for illuminating our understanding of the present. Examining Ireland's heritages from a critical perspective that celebrates notions of heterogeneity and uniqueness, the distinguished contributors to this book scrutinise the multiplicity of complex relations between heritage, history, memory, commemoration, economy, and cultural identity within various historical, geographical and archaeological contexts. Using several examples and case studies, this book raises issues not only from a uniquely Irish perspective, but also investigates the memorialisation and marketing of the Irish past in overseas locations such as the USA and Australia.
The study of Irish history, once riven and constricted, has recently enjoyed a resurgence, with new practitioners, new approaches, and new methods of investigation. The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History represents the diversity of this emerging talent and achievement by bringing together 36 leading scholars of modern Ireland and embracing 400 years of Irish history, uniting early and late modernists as well as contemporary historians. The Handbook offers a set of scholarly perspectives drawn from numerous disciplines, including history, political science, literature, geography, and the Irish language. It looks at the Irish at home as well as in their migrant and diasporic communities. The Handbook combines sets of wide thematic and interpretative essays, with more detailed investigations of particular periods. Each of the contributors offers a summation of the state of scholarship within their subject area, linking their own research insights with assessments of future directions within the discipline. In its breadth and depth and diversity, The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History offers an authoritative and vibrant portrayal of the history of modern Ireland.

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