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Radio messages from J. Vernon McGee delighted and enthralled listeners for years with simple, straightforward language and clear understanding of the Scripture. Now enjoy his personable, yet scholarly, style in a 60-volume set of commentaries that takes you from Genesis to Revelation with new understanding and insight. Each volume includes introductory sections, detailed outlines and a thorough, paragraph-by-paragraph discussion of the text. A great choice for pastors - and even better choice for the average Bible reader and student! Very affordable in a size that can go anywhere, it's available as a complete 60-volume series, in Old Testament or New Testament sets, or individually.
Despite the themes of doom and destruction, the primary message of Jeremiah is one of the love and grace of a God who never gives up on those he has called to be his own. The prophet's life is characterized by suffering, but he points to a new beginning, a new covenant and a new hope, eventually made possible through the unique Suffering Servant. Lamentations powerfully expresses personal and national suffering. Yet, even in these utterances of desperate grief, there are glimpses of hope. Lifting out these significant but understated themes in Jeremiah and Lamentations, this commentary by Hetty Lalleman opens our eyes to an important chapter in salvation history.
The Bible is simply a love letter compiled into sixty-six books and written over a period ofsixteen hundred years by more than forty authors living on three continents. Although theauthors came from different backgrounds, there is one message, one theme, one thread that runs throughout the entire Bible from the first book, Genesis, to the last book, Revelation. That message is God's redeeming love for mankind--a message that is as relevant for us today as it was two thousand years ago.The five books of The Major Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, and Daniel) cover a significant time span and present a wide array of messages. Isaiah spoke to the nation of Judah about 150 years before their exile into Babylonia and called them to be faithful to God. Jeremiah cried out to those same people on the brink of that exile and pleaded for their repentance. Lamentations, written by Jeremiah, presents a dirge as Judah went into exile. The last two major prophets, Ezekiel and Daniel, spoke and wrote to the people in exile, encouraging them to remember that God was still in control and would eventually restore the spiritual fortunes of His disciplined nation.Three of these five books are quite long, and all of them can, at times, be difficult to understand. However, the time and effort invested in striving to understand these writings will pay huge dividends. It has been said that no other section of the Bible offers such a majestic and highly exalted picture of God. His sovereignty is mindboggling. His glory is breathtaking. And in reading these books, our faith finds new depths of confidence.Get ready now to meet once again the God of the prophecies and to be amazed at theprophecies of God as they unfold in these first five prophetical books.
Ryken applies Jeremiah's words to a contemporary audience, urging readers to search out spiritual fractures that may lie beneath the comfortable surface of daily life. Now with ESV Scripture references. Part of the Preaching the Word commentary series.
Jeremiah, the weeping prophet, prophesied for four decades under the last five kings of Judah--from 627 to 587 B.C. His mission: a call to repentance. Among the Apostolic Fathers, Jeremiah was rarely cited, but several later authors give prominent attention to him, including Origen, Theodoret of Cyr and Jerome who wrote individual commentaries on Jeremiah and Cyril of Alexandria and Ephrem the Syrian who compiled catenae. Justin and Irenaeus made use of Jeremiah to define Christians over against Jews. Athanasius made use of him in trinitarian debates. Cyril of Jerusalem, Irenaeus, Basil the Great and Clement of Alexandria all drew on Jeremiah for ethical exhortation. Lamentations, as might be expected, quickly became associated with losses and death, notably in Gregory of Nyssa's Funeral Orations on Meletius. By extension the Fathers saw Lamentations as a description of the challenges that face Christians in a fallen world. Readers will find some ancient authors translated into English here for the first time. Throughout they will gain insight and encouragement in the life of faith as seen through ancient pastoral eyes.
The prophetic books of the Bible contain some of the most difficult passages in the entire Old Testament. Veteran professor Robert Chisholm guides readers through the important and often complex writings of Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, and the Minor Prophets, examining the content, structure, and theological message of each book. Rather than attempting to provide a detailed verse-by-verse commentary, this handbook focuses on the prevailing themes and central messages of the prophetic books. It considers how the message of the prophets would have been heard in their respective historical communities and considers the prophets' continuing importance for contemporary study. Now available in paperback.
Thompson's study on the Book of Jeremiah is part of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament. Like its companion series on the New Testament, this commentary devotes considerable care to achieving a balance between technical information and homiletic-devotional interpretation.

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