Download Free Journalism At The Crossroads Crisis And Opportunity For The Press Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Journalism At The Crossroads Crisis And Opportunity For The Press and write the review.

Our mainstream press is in crisis, and the future of journalism is uncertain. In response to plunging sales and profitability, and an inexorable increase in online and social-media platforms, the Fairfax and News Limited organisations have embarked on major cost-cutting and restructuring exercises. Hundreds of journalists' jobs will be shed, printing plants will close, and The Age and The Sydney Morning Herald — our formerly iconic broadsheet dailies — will soon be downsized to a tabloid format. Meanwhile, corporate predator is hunting Fairfax, and News Corporation internationally is splitting its newspaper operations from its much more lucrative entertainment businesses. In Journalism at the Crossroads, journalist, educator, and media commentator Dr Margaret Simons explores the challenges, and discusses the opportunities they might represent. Simons considers the role of journalist in this new media landscape, why we still need quality news reporting, how new technologies can enhance traditional reporting, ways in which journalists and citizens can work together to break stories, and how media organisations can reinvigorate their newsrooms by engaging directly with the community. The imperative to think about new ways of journalism has arrived, and it is time for all of us — citizens and journalists alike — to become involved in this vital debate.
Philippine observers are often baffled by the economic and political turmoil that dominates headlines about the country. Yet, at the same time, the Philippines continues to hold the potential for successfully combining political freedoms with sustained economic growth and, thus, improving the lives of its people.In this book, a team of distinguished scholars examines these seemingly contradictory trends in order to gain a sense of the country's prospects. Reassessing the fascinating and puzzling "e;Philippines conundrum"e; from various angles, the analyses contribute sharp and fresh insights into a variety of areas including: the presidency and political parties; constitutional change and federalism; the roles of the military, religion, and the media in politics; the conflict in Mindanao; the communist insurgency; macroeconomic developments, issues, and trends; the investment climate and business opportunities; poverty, unemployment, and income inequality; migration and remittances; and the Philippine development record in comparative perspective. While the analyses offered in this volume do not arrive at a consensus, they provide a deeper perspective and a more balanced appreciation of events in the country and a glimpse of the prospects and challenges that it faces.
Are newspapers faced with an existential threat or are they changing to meet the challenges of a digital world? With the newspaper's role in a state of fundamental redefinition, Newspaper Journalism offers a timely and up to the minute analysis of newspapers today, in the context of their historical importance to society. Drawing on their extensive experience in academia and also across local, national, mainstream and alternative newspapers, Cole and Harcup write clearly and engagingly from both industry and scholarly perspectives, and contend that, far from dying, newspapers are doing what they have always done: adapting to a changing environment. This text is essential reading for all students of the press, with comprehensive and critical coverage of the most important debates in the study of newspaper journalism - from ethics and investigative journalism to political economy and the future of the industry. Given the shifting boundaries and central importance of newspapers, it will be of interest to all students of journalism and the media. Praise for the Journalism Studies: Key Texts series: 'It is easy to describe a good textbook for a specific journalistic format... The ideal book has to satisfy a list of requirements that are also bullet-pointed in journalism assignment outlines. A text has to: synthesize the existing body of knowledge; explain concepts clearly; have a logical order of topics; and provide enough information and directions to pursue further study. One may also hope it would include real life examples and be lucid, vivid and a pleasure to read. Hard to find? Not anymore. The new SAGE series Journalism Studies: Key Texts satisfies the main requirements on the list. Carefully planned and meticulously edited by Martin Conboy, David Finkelstein and Bob Franklin, the textbook series is a welcome contribution to the literature of journalism studies... All three books follow the same structural template: an overview of historical development; explication of the political and economic frameworks within particular types of journalism; a review of contemporary practices; social demographics; a comparative analysis of practices around the world; a summary of main conceptual approaches; an indication of future directions; recommendations for further reading. This strong organization resembles a template for a course outline. This is intentional because the series is aimed both at students and their practice-based lecturers, who often come straight from industry and need time to adjust to the academic environment... [The series] achieves its aim to bridge the sometimes too evident dissonance between journalism theory and practice... They successfully situate discussions about journalism in social and historical contexts. We see the faces of individual journalists, the circumstances of news production, the relationship with owners, the battle between the public service and the profit nature of news, the relevance of journalism work. The detailed account of the conditions under which newspaper, radio and alternative journalism is produced and performed make the Journalism Studies: Key Texts series mandatory reading for both journalism students and their lecturers' - Verica Rupar, Journalism Studies
With the exception of a few iconic moments such as Rosa Parks’s 1955 refusal to move to the back of a Montgomery bus, we hear little about what black women activists did prior to 1960. Perhaps this gap is due to the severe repression that radicals of any color in America faced as early as the 1930s, and into the Red Scare of the 1950s. To be radical, and black and a woman was to be forced to the margins and consequently, these women’s stories have been deeply buried and all but forgotten by the general public and historians alike. In this exciting work of historical recovery, Dayo F. Gore unearths and examines a dynamic, extended network of black radical women during the early Cold War, including established Communist Party activists such as Claudia Jones, artists and writers such as Beulah Richardson, and lesser known organizers such as Vicki Garvin and Thelma Dale. These women were part of a black left that laid much of the groundwork for both the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and later strains of black radicalism. Radicalism at the Crossroads offers a sustained and in-depth analysis of the political thought and activism of black women radicals during the Cold War period and adds a new dimension to our understanding of this tumultuous time in United States history.
The future of newspapers is hotly contested. Pessimistic pundits predict their imminent demise while others envisage a new era of participatory journalism online, with yet others advocating increased investment "in quality journalism" rather than free gifts and DVDs, as the necessary cure for the current parlous state of newspapers. Globally, newspapers confront highly variable prospects reflecting their location in different market sectors, countries and journalism cultures. But despite this diversity, they face similar challenges in responding to the increased competition from expansive radio and 24 hour television news channels; the emergence of free "Metro" papers; the delivery of news services on billboards, pod casts and mobile telephony; the development of online editions, as well as the burgeoning of blogs, citizen journalists and User Generated Content. Newspapers’ revenue streams are also under attack as advertising increasingly migrates online. This authoritative collection of research based essays by distinguished scholars and journalists from around the globe, brings together a judicious mix of academic expertise and professional journalistic experience to analyse and report on the future of newspapers. This book was published as special issues of Journalism Practice and Journalism Studies.
This book examines the role played by two popular private newspapers in the struggle for democracy in Zimbabwe, one case from colonial Rhodesia and the other from the post-colonial era. It argues that, operating under oppressive political regimes and in the dearth of credible opposition political parties or as a platform for opposition political parties, the African Daily News, between 1956-1964, and the Daily News, between 1999-2003, played an essential role in opening up spaces for political freedom in the country. Both newspapers were ultimately shut down by the respective government of the time. The newspapers allowed reading publics the opportunity to participate in politics by providing a daily analytical alternative, to that offered by the government and the state media, in relation to the respective political crises that unfolded in each of these periods. The book further examines both the information policies pursued by the different governments and the way these affected the functioning of private media in their quest to provide an "ideal" public sphere. It explores issues of ownership, funding and editorial policies in reference to each case and how these affected the production of news and issue coverage. It considers issues of class and geography in shaping public response. It also focuses on state reactions to the activities of these newspapers and how these, in turn, affected the activities of private media actors. Finally, it considers the cases together to consider the meanings of the closing down of these newspapers during the two eras under discussion and contributes to the debates about print media vis-à-vis the new forms of media that have come to the fore.
A provocative, timely account of the changing face of journalism from a pioneer of the new-media revolution For a long time, media organisations have controlled the news, treating their audiences as products for advertisers. Yet as journalism has moved online and behind paywalls, the public is demanding more say in how the news is created. They are using blogs, Twitter, and Facebook to share stories, and selecting their sources to create their own ‘front page’. In this lively, biting critique, media commentator Tim Dunlop explores the rise of the audience, and how unprepared the mainstream media has been for this changing balance of power. Drawing on his experiences as a prominent political blogger, he argues that the future of meaningful journalism — the sort we need in order to be informed citizens — will increasingly rely on journalists and editors taking the audience into their confidence and working with them, rather than against them. The New Front Page is a passionate plea on behalf of those tired of being talked down to by the fourth estate. Perceptive and illuminating, it asks audiences and media to work together to hold the powerful to account, and to produce the sort of news and analysis that enriches public debate.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact