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Keele was the first new university, founded as the University College of North Staffordshire in 1949, and admitting its first 159 students in 1950. By awarding its own degrees, based on its own curriculum, Keele broke the mould of university education in the United Kingdom. What had appeared to be impossible in the 1940s became the norm when later new universities were founded in the 1960s. In this book John Kolbert follows Lord Lindsay's struggle to establish the Keele Experiment, based on his "Keele idea". He traces the succession of principals, the establishment of Keele as a university in 1962, the unrest of the late-1960s and the very difficult years of the government cuts in the 1980s. Keele suffered worst than most, and the author, through first-hand experience as a member of staff, gives an account of how Keele, not only survived, but thrived in the face of adversity.
Volume XX/2 of History of Universities contains the customary mix of learned articles, book reviews, conference reports, and bibliographical information, which makes this publication such an indispensable tool for the historian of higher education. Its contributions range widely geographically, chronologically, and in subject-matter. The volume is, as always, a lively combination of original research and invaluable reference material.
Local Citizenship in the Global Arena proposes a reconsideration of both citizenship and citizenship education, moving away equally from prevailing ‘global citizenship’ and ‘fundamental British values’ approaches towards a curriculum for education that is essentially about creating cosmopolitan, included and inclusive, politically-engaged citizens of communities local, national and global. Viewing education as both problem and solution, Findlow argues that today’s climate of rapid and unpredictable geopolitical and cultural re-scoping requires an approach to citizenship education that both reflects and shapes society, paying attention to relationships between the local and global aspects of political voice, equality and community. Drawing on a range of international examples, she explores the importance and possibilities of a form of education that instead of promoting divisive competition, educates about citizenship in its various forms, and encourages the sorts of open and radical thinking that can help young people cross ideological and physical borders and use their voice in line with their own, and others’, real, long-term interests. Successive chapters develop this argument by critically examining the key elements of citizenship discourses through the interrelated lenses of geopolitical change, nationalism, the competition fetish, critical pedagogy, multiculturalism, protest politics, feminism and ecology, and highlighting ways in which the situationally diverse lived realities of ‘citizenship’ have been mediated by different forms of education. The book draws attention to how we think of education’s place in a world of combined globalisation, localism, anti-state revolt and xenophobia. It will be of key interest to academics, researchers and postgraduate students in the fields of education, political science, philosophy, sociology, social policy, cultural studies and anthropology.
In the decades after 1944 the four nations of Britain shared a common educational programme. By 2015, this programme had fragmented: the patterns of schooling and higher education in Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and England resembled each other less and less. This new edition of the popular Education in Britain traces and explains this process of divergence, as well as the arguments and conflicts that have accompanied it. With a reach that extends from the primary school to the university, and from culture to politics and economics, Ken Jones explores the achievements and limits of post-war reform and the egalitarian aspirations of the 1960s and 1970s. He registers the impact of the Thatcherite revolution of the 1980s, and of the New Labour governments which were its inheritors. Turning to the twenty-first century, Jones tracks the educational consequences of devolution and austerity. The result is a book which is more attentive than any other to the ever-increasing diversity of education in Britain. This comprehensive and accessible overview will have a wide appeal. It will also be an invaluable resource on courses in educational studies, teacher education and sociology.
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