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This refreshed and dynamic Eighth Edition of Keeping the Republic revitalizes the twin themes of power and citizenship by adding to the imperative for students to navigate competing political narratives about who should get what, and how they should get it. The exploding possibilities of the digital age make this task all the more urgent and complex. Christine Barbour and Gerald Wright, the authors of this bestseller, continue to meet students where they are in order to give them a sophisticated understanding of American politics and teach them the skills to think critically about it. The entire book has been refocused to look not just at power and citizenship but at the role that control of information and its savvy consumption play in keeping the republic.
Effectively using the themes of power and citizenship, Christine Barbour and Gerald C. Wright explain how and why institutions and rules determine who wins and who loses in American politics. Whether you get your news from a popular blog or a traditional media outlet, this book models critical thinking and provides the tools you need to be a savvy consumer of political information. And with your purchase of this Media Edition, you get FREE access to an enhanced eBook, which includes links to audio, video, data, articles, historical background, profiles, and CQ Researcher policy reports that bring depth and interactivity to the book Keeping the Republic is filled with phenomenal resources that help students fully engage in the text. It is well written and extremely substantive. Students rave about the graphics, pictures, and other visuals that help guide them as they understand the material. The transitions from topic to topic are smooth and clear, and the real-world applications are also extremely well done. A terrific textbook for intro students, and a great foundation for budding political scientists."---Alison Dagnes, Shippensburg university "Keeping the Republic presents the information in a balanced and visually appealing style that gets, and keeps, students reading and engaged with the content. The graphics and `Don't Be Fooled By...' features are well above the competition. The online instructor resources are excellent." ---Gary A. Johnson, Weber State University "The political science faculty at our Virginia state university have utilized Keeping the Republic for many years. Barbour and Wright offer current and helpful pedagogical features that encourage class discussion and reinforce the students' understanding of critical information. The text's organization offers a useful means of breaking down the semester-length course, and my students genuinely like the layout of the text."---Peter M. Carlson, Christopher Newport University "Keeping the Republic simplifies complicated concepts without losing the key points. Students find the book easy to read and well organized for study. The book is especially well suited for the non-political science major and works well for large-sized sections or for online courses. The `Thinking Outside the Box' questions, along with the helpful test bank, encourage discussion in class or in online forums."---Donald S. Inbody, Texas State University "Keeping the Republic holds the attention of my students better than books I have used in the past. I like to include as much pop culture as I can in the teaching of my class, and this book is the best one I have found that makes an effort to do the same."---Norman Rodriguez, John Wood Community College "What's at stake? This book repeats that question over and over. It defines a perspective that makes Keeping the Republic meaningful to all students of American government. Citizenship is a skill, and this text approaches government from the point of view of the citizen. It asks the reader to be critical, not in the sense that government is necessarily the problem, but rather in asking how government structure and operations can be improved to enhance the lives of the citizens of the United States, of which the reader is one. And, importantly, the book requires the reader to confront the question of what role and responsibility do I, the citizen, have. By default, the approach pulls the student in and makes the student a partner in the book and its conclusions."---John P. McIver, University of Texas, Austin "I continue to assign Keeping the Republic because the authors do a great job of keeping students engaged. There are many features that make this text more interesting to students---like the `Profiles in Citizenship' in each chapter that explain how individual Americans take an active part in politics. These profiles provide interesting personal narratives about why citizenship and participation matter while also reinforcing chapter material." ---Jason D. Mycoff, University of Delaware
Helping readers understand the relevance of constitutional politics to their everyday lives, this probing study highlights the seemingly permanent and significant connection between constitutional principles, the way they are exploited by politicians, and how they shape the character of public policy. Presents an orderly, congruous study, linking policy processes and results to an institutional and political framework familiar to most readers from earlier studies in American government. Discusses how government institutions and ideas created or inspired by the Constitution have a distinct impact on both policy processes and policy results; how political forces often exploit the Constitution and its structural, ideological, and political byproducts to influence public policy; and how the manipulation of this form of “constitutional politicsø has shed a destructive light on contemporary politics and government. Covers such recent events as the Clinton impeachment and trial, the impact of special prosecutors on the strength and behavior of policy institutions, and how the rush to redefine and expand the meaning of constitutional rights impacts policy processes and outputs negatively. For those in public policy, public administration, or government, or for anyone interested in how the Constitution has affected the American governmental structure and policymaking.
This book is a collection of refereed invited papers on the history of computing from the 1940s to the 1990s with one paper going back to look at Italian calculating/computing machines from the first century to the 20th century. The 22 papers cover a wide range of computing related topics such as specific early computer systems, their construction, their use and their users; software programming and operating systems; people involved in the theory, design and use of these computers; computer education; and conservation of computing technology. Many of the authors were actually involved in the events they describe and share their specific reflections on the history of computing.

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