Download Free Landscapes And Lives The Scottish Forest Through The Ages Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Landscapes And Lives The Scottish Forest Through The Ages and write the review.

Ancient oakwoods, thickets of shimmering birches or lonely clumps of gnarled Caledonian pine all count among the most atmospheric and inspiring places in Scotland. This is a winning portrait of the forests as we encounter them today, and their part in Scotland's story: from the Ice Age to the great woodlands imagined by the planting Dukes of Atholl and the blanket spruce plantations of the post-war years. Eloquently written with a blend of myth and archaeological evidence, vivid glimpses of the great personalities and a taste of environmental and economic controversies, Landscapes and Lives is a book as rich and memorable as the forests themselves.
Landscape is one of the most fascinating assets of Europe. The great diversity in landscapes reflects a multitude of historical layers. This book presents the story of some of the most expressive European landscapes. It explores how engagement may safeguard and improve landscape identity for the future.
This book is a resource covering the finest walks, treks and climbs to be found in Scotland, written by an award-winning author. From the rolling hills of the Southern Uplands to the great granite plateaus of the Cairngorms to the jagged peaks of Torridon and the Cuillin hills on the Isle of Skye, Scotland has a rich variety of wild landscapes and terrain that is perfect for many activities. Scotland's lochs, forests and rivers offer spectacular scenery and a tranquility that visitors embrace time and time again. Author Chris Townsend was the first person to complete a continuous round of all the Scottish Munros and Tops. He has also walked across the Scottish mountains from coast to coast 14 times, and has served as the President of the Mountaineering Council of Scotland. With superb photography and an exceptional level of detail throughout, this book is an ideal all-embracing guide for the mountain adventurer.
In this comprehensive book, the critical components of the European landscape – forest, parkland, and other grazed landscapes with trees are addressed. The book considers the history of grazed treed landscapes, of large grazing herbivores in Europe, and the implications of the past in shaping our environment today and in the future. Debates on the types of anciently grazed landscapes in Europe, and what they tell us about past and present ecology, have been especially topical and controversial recently. This treatment brings the current discussions and the latest research to a much wider audience. The book breaks new ground in broadening the scope of wood-pasture and woodland research to address sites and ecologies that have previously been overlooked but which hold potential keys to understanding landscape dynamics. Eminent contributors, including Oliver Rackham and Frans Vera, present a text which addresses the importance of history in understanding the past landscape, and the relevance of historical ecology and landscape studies in providing a future vision.
The first modern history of Scottish woodlands, this highly illustrated volume explores the changing relationship between trees and people from the time of Scotland's first settlement, focusing on the period 1500 to 1920. Drawing on work in natural science, geography and history, as well as on the authors' own research, it presents an accessible and readable account that balances social, economic and environmental factors. Two opening chapters describe the early history of the woodlands. The book is then divided into chapters that consider traditional uses and management, the impact of outsiders on the pine woods and the oakwoods in the first phase of exploitation, and the effect of industrialization. Separate chapters are devoted to case studies of management at Strathcarron, Glenorchy, Rothiemurchus, and on Skye.
This is an account of the Neolithic period in Scotland from its earliest traces around 4000 BC to the transformation of Neolithic society in the Early Bronze Age fifteen hundred years later. Gordon Noble inteprets Scottish material in the context of debates and issues in European archaeology, comparing sites and practices identified in Scotland to those found elsewhere in Britain and beyond. He considers the nature and effects of memory, sea and land travel, ritualisation, island identities, mortuary practice, symbolism and environmental impact. He synthesises excavations and research conducted over the last century and more, bringing together the evidence for understanding what happened in Scotland during this long period. His long-term and regionally based analysis suggests new directions for the interpretation of the Neolithic more generally. After outlining the chronology of the Neolithic in Europe Dr Noble considers its origins in Scotland. He investigates why the Earlier Neolithic in Scotland is characterised by regionally-distinct monumental traditions and asks if these reflect different conceptions of the world. He uses a long-term perspective to explain the nature of monumental landscapes in the Later Neolithic and considers whether Neolithic society as a whole might have been created and maintained through interactions at places where large-scale monuments were built. He ends by considering how the Neolithic was transformed in the Early Bronze Age through the manipulation of the material remains of the past. Neolithic Scotland provides a comprehensive, approachable and up-to-date account of the Scottish Neolithic. Such a book has not been available for many years. It will be widely welcomed.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact