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It is absolutely essential that today’s law librarians are digitally literate and possess an understanding and awareness of recent advancements and trends in information technology as they pertain to the library field. Law Librarianship in the Digital Age offers a one-stop, comprehensive guide to achieving both of those goals.
While the digital revolution has touched every aspect of law librarianship, perhaps nowhere has the effect been more profound than in the area of collection development. Many of the materials law libraries traditionally collected in print form are now available in electronic format. Digital technology has affected the way we select, order, and process legal materials. The World Wide Web has created an explosion of both commercial and private online publishing. The cost of electronic publishing has caused many traditional law book publishers to sell their companies rather than invest in the needed technologies to compete in the 21st century. Small publishers and book jobbers have been forced to reinvent themselves. The amount of legal information available and its costs continue to soar. Law Library Collection Development in the Digital Age deals with these and other issues related to law library collection development. Chapters range from the theoretical to the practical. Inspired by Penny Hazleton's seminal paper “How Much of Your Print Collection is Really on Lexis or Westlaw?” the editors and chapter authors of Law Library Collection Development in the Digital Age endeavor to expand on professor Hazleton's work, with examinations of: the role of law libraries in strategic planning for distance learning Web mirror sites trust vs. antitrust issues access vs. ownership issues how law libraries deal with electronic court records, dockets, and filings the growth of e-journals as they relate to legal publishing how the Hein Greenslips and Blackwell North America's Bookservice cover legal materials past, present, and future roles of specialized book jobbers and more! Anyone interested in law librarianship or the information industry will find this book informative and useful. Make it a part of your professional collection today.
Presents a guide to intellectual property issues for librarians and patrons, with information on patents, copyright, and trademarks.
Cosplay, comics, anime, and geek culture have exploded into the mainstream over recent years and have resulted in a thriving community of costume enthusiasts and pop culture fans. Libraries on the leading edge are already embracing cosplay by integrating this new worldwide sensation into their programming and events. Cosply in Libraries: How to Embrace Costume Play in Your Library includes quotes and interviews with librarians who are incorporating cosplay into their programming as well as with cosplayers. You’ll also find 32 full-color photographs of cosplay in action to give you both ideas and inspiration for getting started. Learn all about the world of cosplay and how you can host cosplay events, workshops, makerspaces, clubs, and more in your library!
Developing Librarian Competencies for the Digital Age identifies specific digital skills needed for success, ways of developing those skills, and ways of assessing them. This book identifies the crux of what it means to a librarian in the 21st century for library professionals at any stage in their career in any library setting.
Scholars in all fields now have access to an unprecedented wealth of online information, tools, and services. The Internet lies at the core of an information infrastructure for distributed, data-intensive, and collaborative research. Although much attention has been paid to the new technologies making this possible, from digitized books to sensor networks, it is the underlying social and policy changes that will have the most lasting effect on the scholarly enterprise. In Scholarship in the Digital Age, Christine Borgman explores the technical, social, legal, and economic aspects of the kind of infrastructure that we should be building for scholarly research in the twenty-first century.Borgman describes the roles that information technology plays at every stage in the life cycle of a research project and contrasts these new capabilities with the relatively stable system of scholarly communication, which remains based on publishing in journals, books, and conference proceedings. No framework for the impending "data deluge" exists comparable to that for publishing. Analyzing scholarly practices in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities, Borgman compares each discipline's approach to infrastructure issues. In the process, she challenges the many stakeholders in the scholarly infrastructure -- scholars, publishers, libraries, funding agencies, and others -- to look beyond their own domains to address the interaction of technical, legal, economic, social, political, and disciplinary concerns. Scholarship in the Digital Age will provoke a stimulating conversation among all who depend on a rich and robust scholarly environment.
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