Download Free Learner S Privilege And Responsibility Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Learner S Privilege And Responsibility and write the review.

This book is about the learner side of the teaching and learning equilibrium, centering on the educational experiences and perspectives of Chinese students in the United States. These students ranged from kindergarteners, adolescents, undergraduate, graduate, to adult learners, across the educational spectrum. Because Chinese students are the largest cohort among all international students in the U.S., and their prior educational experiences and perspectives in China are so different from those in the U.S., exploring who they are, what their learning experiences have been, and how their learning needs can be better met, may not only allow U.S. educators to teach them more effectively, but also help the educational community in both countries better learn about and from each other. The chapters in the book examine the constructs of learner privilege and responsibility in the teaching and learning equation, cultural and linguistic challenges and transitional adjustments, selfconcept, learning strategies, comparison and contrast of differences and similarities between Chinese and American students, and/or critical reflections on significant issues confronting Chinese learners. While each chapter is situated in its own research literature and connects with its own teaching and learning practices, all of them are united around the overarching themes of the book: the experiences and perspectives of diverse learners from Chinese backgrounds in the United States. The chapters also flesh out some of the larger theoretical/pedagogical issues between education in China and in the United States, provide useful lenses for rethinking about and better understanding their differences and similarities, as well as offer pertinent suggestions about how the educational community in both countries may benefit from learning about and from each other.
White privilege is viewed by many as a birthright and is in essence an existentialist norm that is based upon the power and privilege of pigmentation. Because it is the norm for the white race, this privilege is virtually invisible, but its racist byproducts are not. It becomes common for white to believe falsely that their privilege was earned by hard work and intellectual superiority; it becomes the center of their worldview. The reality is that when they defend their pigmentary privilege, what they are really saying is that peoples of color have earned their disadvantage. This volume focuses on facilitating our understanding of the conceptual correlation between white privilege and racism and how these intertwined threads are manifested in selected areas of adult and continuing education practice. Chapters include: White Racist Ideology and the Myth of a Postracial Society The Nature of White Privilege in the Teaching and Training of Adults Racism and White Privilege in Adult Education Graduate Programs: Admissions, Retention, and Currcicula Whiteness at Work in Vocational Training in Australia White Privilege in Human Resource Development Immigration, Racial Profiling, and White Privilege: Community-Based Challenges and Practices for Adult Educators A Living Spiral of Understanding: Community-Based Adult Education The Intersections of White Privilege and Racism: Moving Forward Together the contributors have assembled a volume to ignite the much-needed discussion of linkages between the white racist ideology, white privilege, and white attitudes and behaviors behind that racism. This is the 125th volume of the Jossey-Bass higher education quarterly report series New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. Noted for its depth of coverage, New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education is an indispensable series that explores issues of common interest to instructors, administrators, counselors, and policymakers in a broad range of adult and continuing education settings, such as colleges and universities, extension programs, businesses, libraries, and museums.
In the worldwide movements of educational reform, educators are forging new roles, identities and relationships. Leadership is vital, but must be rooted in the capacity for learning. This volume responds to the tensions and paradoxes brought by educational reforms, presenting a critical discourse on teachers as learners. The contributions bring an array of cultural settings and methodological orientations, and reveal contextual burdens that teachers should not carry in isolation. Teachers’ learning demands collective engagement to turn challenges into opportunities in a sustainable quest for higher goals. The discourse concludes with a vision for a new relationship among educational workers as a joint force of learners in a cross-boundary endeavor for moral commitment to education.
The concept of individual responsibility has taken on a signi?cance comparable to that of ‘choice’ in the global rise of neo-liberalism of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The rise of neo-liberalism is most often analysed through the lenses of theory, governmentality and societal structures. There has been a tendency for an- ysis to become overly abstract with the subjective experiences of the social actors missing dimensions in the literature. This book draws on more than 20 years of international research that has focused on the subjective experiences of people as actors in changing social landscapes. These landscapes are differently positioned politically, economically and socially, in relation to the rise of neo-liberalism. Comparisons enable the differences in people’s experiences to be located, explored and explained in relation to different soc- economic landscapes, thus throwing into relief the effects of neo-liberal policies where they are found. My approach is to create an extended dialogue between ideas and evidence, starting close to home, and then extending to speci?c international comparisons and to wider explorations of the central themes of the book: human agency and social responsibility. Finally, I return to social landscapes of Britain, to review the position and potential for social change in societies that exemplify what Sennett has termed ‘Anglo-American regimes’, in contrast to ‘Rhine regimes’ as exempli?ed by Germany.

Best Books