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Gwen Romagnoli has written numerous personal essays as well as travel and food articles for the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times, and the American Express Magazine. She lived for many years in Italy, but met her Roman husband, Franco, in the U.S. Together they wrote the book, Italy, the Romagnoli Way: A Culinary Journey, about lesser-known places in Italy. Their late-in-life marriage was sadly cut short by Franco's death. This book is dedicated to his memory. "Gwen Romagnoli has written these essays in simple, limpid prose, a style casual and friendly, with a feeling that comes straight from the heart. These brief essays offer rare comfort. Gwen Romagnoli's Learning to be a Widow is about the little things--everyday objects and events-- that connected her deeply to her husband, and how she lives now with these memories. By speaking so directly about her own experience, she gives solace to others who are making their own hard journey." --Eugene Mirabelli, author of Renato, the Painter "Gwen Romagnoli's book is about widowhood, but you do not have to be a widow to find pleasure and poignancy in these pages. It is a narrative about love and loss, and finding meaning in relationships, at any age and in any circumstance. Sensitively observed and beautifully written." -- Jessica Treadway, author of Lacy Eye "This remarkable book--a love story, really--leads the reader through widowhood with gentleness and compassion. Best of all, although it is a wrenching narrative of loss, the book also offers hope to those who once loved - and hope to love again." -- Lynne Potts, author of A Block in Time: A History of Boston's South End "Writing with brave honesty and generosity of spirit, Gwen Romagnoli is a treasured companion through a harsh terrain. Though her words describe a deeply personal experience, they carry a universality to embrace all who are acquainted with grief." -- Ellen Steinbaum, poet and contributor to the poetry anthology, The Widows' Handbook
While there is no how-to guide for young widows navigating life post-loss, The One Thing: 100 Widows Share Lessons on Love, Loss, and Life is a powerful resource for new widows - told from the vantage point of those who have lived it. The coffee-table style book offers 10 chapters and includes nostalgic black and white photography throughout. Topics range from dealing with the rawest stages of grief to raising children as a solo-parent and balancing the often fragile relationship with in-laws. The bold, insightful, and unfiltered lessons the 100 widows have learned along the way can be instrumental for those just beginning their journey into widowhood. Uncover the one thing they would share with the next wave of widows about rebuilding post-loss and how to ultimately move to a place of healing.
Poor Widow Me: Moments of feeling & dealing & finding the funny along the way captures the essence of widowhood with a fresh, smart, often humorous, always searingly honest perspective in a collection of 84 bits about life after a husband dies that will bring a unique sense of grief relief to widows and their loved ones, emphasizing that when we lose our spouse we don't lose ourselves. Carol Scibelli is a comedy writer so she is wired to be funny, so there is plenty to chuckle about in the book. Humor is honest, laughing is healing. And, although these incidents are from her life, the core of her story is very much every widow's story. When Carol's husband realized he wasn't going to live, he said to her "This is going to be a life-changer for you. It will be an adventure." She often says to him in death what she rarely said to him in life, "You were right, honey."
Unlike anything Joyce Carol Oates has written before, A Widow’s Story is the universally acclaimed author’s poignant, intimate memoir about the unexpected death of Raymond Smith, her husband of forty-six years, and its wrenching, surprising aftermath. A recent recipient of National Book Critics Circle Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award, Oates, whose novels (Blonde, The Gravedigger’s Daughter, Little Bird of Heaven, etc.) rank among the very finest in contemporary American fiction, offers an achingly personal story of love and loss. A Widow’s Story is a literary memoir on a par with The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion and Calvin Trillin’s About Alice.
“A frank, poignant memoir about an unlikely marriage, a tragic death in Iraq, and the soul-testing work of picking up the pieces” (People) in the tradition of such powerful bestsellers as Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking and Carole Radziwill’s What Remains. Artis Henderson was a free-spirited young woman with dreams of traveling the world and one day becoming a writer. Marrying a conservative Texan soldier and becoming an Army wife was never part of her plan, but when she met Miles, Artis threw caution to the wind and moved with him to a series of Army bases in dusty Southern towns, far from the exotic future of her dreams. If this was true love, she was ready to embrace it. But when Miles was training and Artis was left alone, she experienced feelings of isolation and anxiety. It did not take long for a wife’s worst fears to come true. On November 6, 2006, the Apache helicopter carrying Miles crashed in Iraq, leaving twenty-six-year-old Artis—in official military terms—an “unremarried widow.” In this memoir Artis recounts not only the unlikely love story she shared with Miles and her unfathomable recovery in the wake of his death—from the dark hours following the military notification to the first fumbling attempts at new love—but also reveals how Miles’s death mirrored her own father’s, in a plane crash that Artis survived when she was five years old and that left her own mother a young widow. Unremarried Widow is “a powerful look at mourning as a military wife….You can finish it in a day and find yourself haunted weeks later” (The New York Times Book Review).
“Now I know that every single day, the best and the worst, only lasts for twenty-four hours.” —Tricia Lott Williford, And Life Comes Back When your life falls apart—through a death, a lost relationship, a diagnosis—you want more than anything to know that your pain has a purpose. And that beyond your pain, a new day awaits. Tricia Lott Williford discovered this in a few tragic hours when her thirty-five-year-old husband died unexpectedly. In And Life Comes Back, she writes with soaring prose about her tender, brave journey as a widow with two young boys in the agonizing days and months that followed his death. And Life Comes Back documents the tenacity of love, the exquisite transience of each moment, and the laughter that comes even in loss. This traveler’s guide to finding new life after setbacks offers no easy answers or glib spiritual maxims but instead draws you into your own story and the hope that waits for you even now.
Lisa Niemi and Patrick Swayze first met as teenagers at his mother's dance studio. He was older and just a bit cocky; she was the gorgeous waif who refused to worship the ground he walked on. It didn't take long for them to fall in love. Their thirty-four year marriage -- which they explored together in The Time of My Life -- was a uniquely passionate partnership. Now, for the first time, Lisa will share what it was like to care for her husband as he battled Stage IV pancreatic cancer, and will describe his last days when she simply tried to keep him comfortable. She writes searingly about her grief in the aftermath of Patrick's death, and candidly discusses the challenges that the past fourteen months without him have posed. But while this is an emotionally honest and unflinching depiction of illness, death, and loss, it is also a hopeful and life-affirming exploration of the power of the human spirit. Lisa shows that no matter how dark the prospect of another day may seem, there are always reserves of strength to call upon, and the love shared between two people will never truly die.

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