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Self-regulation refers to the self's ability to control its own thoughts, emotions, and actions. Through self-regulation, we consciously control how much we eat, whether we give in to impulse, task performance, obsessive thoughts, and even the extent to which we allow ourselves recognition of our emotions. This work provides a synthesis and overview of recent and long-standing research findings of what is known of the successes and failures of self-regulation. People the world over suffer from the inability to control their finances, their weight, their emotions, their craving for drugs, their sexual impulses, and more. The United States in particular is regarded by some observers as a society addicted to addiction. Therapy and support groups have proliferated not only for alcoholics and drug abusers but for all kinds of impulse control, from gambling to eating chocolate. Common to all of these disorders is a failure of self-regulation, otherwise known as "self-control." The consequences of these self-control problems go beyond individuals to affect family members and society at large. In Losing Control, the authors provide a single reference source with comprehensive information on general patterns of self-regulation failure across contexts, research findings on specific self-control disorders, and commentary on the clinical and social aspects of self-regulation failure. Self-control is discussed in relation to what the "self" is, and the cognitive, motivational, and emotional factors that impinge on one's ability to control one's "self." Key Features * Discusses the importance of the concept of self-regulation to general issues of autonomy and identity * Encompasses self-control of thoughts, feelings, and actions * Contains a special section on the control of impulses and appetites * First book to integrate recent research into a broad overview of the area
Self-Regulation and Ego Control examines the physiological effects of depletion, the effects of psychological variables in self-control depletion effects, the role of motivational and goal states on self-control depletion effects, and a number of cognitive perspectives on self-control exertion. This insightful book begins with an introduction of self-control theories, ego depletion phenomena, and experimental examples of research in self-control, and concludes by delineating more inclusive and comprehensive models of self-regulation that can account for the full spectrum of findings from current research. In recent years, researchers have had difficulty identifying the underlying resources responsible for depletion effects. Moreover, further research has identified several psychological and motivational factors that can ameliorate depletion effects. These findings have led many to question assumptions of the dominant strength model and suggest that capacity limitations alone cannot account for the observed effects of depletion. Self-Regulation and Ego Control facilitates discourse across researchers from different ideological camps and advances more integrated views of self-regulation based on this research. Covers the neuropsychological evidence for depletion effects, highlighting the roles of reward, valuation, and control in self-regulation Reviews the roles of willpower, expectancies of mental energy change, and individual differences in the modulation of self-control exertion Highlights the effects of various states such as positive mood, power, implementation intentions, mindfulness, and social rejection as moderators of depletion Provides clarification of the distinctions between self-control in the context of goal-directed behavior versus related terms like self-regulation, executive control, and inhibition Details the overlap between mental and physical depletion, and the potential interplay and substitutability of resources Challenges the view that depletion reflects capacity limitations and includes newer models that take a more motivational account of resource allocation Facilitates discourse across researchers from different ideological camps within the field. Informs and enriches future research and advances more integrated views of self-regulation
The ability to regulate and control our behaviors is a key accomplishment of the human species, yet the psychological mechanisms involved in self-regulation remain incompletely understood. This book presents contributions from leading international researchers who survey the most recent developments in this fascinating area.
​How can people master their own thoughts, feelings, and actions? This question is central to the scientific study of self-regulation. The behavioral side of self-regulation has been extensively investigated over the last decades, but the biological machinery that allows people to self-regulate has mostly remained vague and unspecified. Handbook of Biobehavioral Approaches to Self-Regulation corrects this imbalance. Moving beyond traditional mind-body dualities, the various contributions in the book examine how self-regulation becomes established in cardiovascular, hormonal, and central nervous systems. Particular attention is given to the dynamic interplay between affect and cognition in self-regulation. The book also addresses the psychobiology of effort, the impact of depression on self-regulation, the development of self-regulation, and the question what causes self-regulation to succeed or fail. These novel perspectives provide readers with a new, biologically informed understanding of self-awareness and self-agency. Among the topics being covered are: Self-regulation in an evolutionary perspective. The muscle metaphor in self-regulation in the light of current theorizing on muscle physiology. From distraction to mindfulness: psychological and neural mechanisms of attention strategies in self-regulation. Self-regulation in social decision-making: a neurobiological perspective. Mental effort: brain and autonomic correlates in health and disease. A basic and applied model of the body-mind system. Handbook of Biobehavioral Approaches to Self-Regulation provides a wealth of theoretical insights into self-regulation, with great potential for future applications for improving self-regulation in everyday life settings, including education, work, health, and interpersonal relationships. The book highlights a host of exciting new ideas and directions and is sure to provoke a great deal of thought and discussion among researchers, practitioners, and graduate-level students in psychology, education, neuroscience, medicine, and behavioral economics.
In the World Library of Psychologists series, international experts present career-long collections of what they judge to be their finest pieces—extracts from books, key articles, salient research findings, and their major practical theoretical contributions. In this volume, Roy F. Baumeister reflects on his distinguished career as an eminent scholar in the field of self-control and self-regulation, as well as belonging, rejection, free will, and consciousness. Offering a unique perspective on both the program of research in ego-depletion as one of social psychology’s most widely successful theories, and its position in the changing landscape of the scientific field, the book charts Baumeister’s development as one of the pioneers of study into self-control. Featuring a newly written introductory piece in which the author offers a unique insight into the initial findings that led to an eventual theory of ego-depletion, this collection will give readers a vital understanding of how the hugely influential theory of ego depletion first came to be developed, and is essential reading for students and researchers in self-control and self-regulation.
This authoritative handbook comprehensively examines the conscious and nonconscious processes by which people regulate their thoughts, emotions, attention, behavior, and impulses. Individual differences in self-regulatory capacities are explored, as are developmental pathways. The volume reviews how self-regulation shapes, and is shaped by, social relationships. Failures of self-regulation are also addressed, in chapters on addictions, overeating, compulsive spending, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Wherever possible, contributors identify implications of the research for helping people enhance their self-regulatory capacities and pursue desired goals.
Summarizing and integrating the major empirical research of the past twenty years, this volume presents a thorough review of the subject, with a special focus on what sets people with low self-esteem apart from others. As the subject is central to the understanding of personality, mental health, and social adjustment, this work will be appreciated by professionals and advanced students in the fields of personality, social, clinical, and organizational psychology.

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