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How can you make sure that your child gets what he or she needs in those critical first few years of life? For parents looking for gentle guidance—user friendly ideas for maximizing their child's development, tips for developing a strong parent-child relationship, and ways to ensure strong cognitive, social, and emotional success—this book is for you! Above all, this book will teach you how to maximize your time with your young child—whether you are a working or stay-at-home parent—so that they get the best of you during the time you have to give! Making Kid Time Count For Ages 0-3 is research-based and parent tested—highlighting the 4 key elements that are behind any successful parent-child relationship: Time, Connection, Interaction, and Play. More importantly, this book offers a combination of current research findings and hands-on, easy “together time” activities—designed for today's busy parents and their young children.
Decades of research have demonstrated that the parent-child dyad and the environment of the familyâ€"which includes all primary caregiversâ€"are at the foundation of children’s well- being and healthy development. From birth, children are learning and rely on parents and the other caregivers in their lives to protect and care for them. The impact of parents may never be greater than during the earliest years of life, when a child’s brain is rapidly developing and when nearly all of her or his experiences are created and shaped by parents and the family environment. Parents help children build and refine their knowledge and skills, charting a trajectory for their health and well-being during childhood and beyond. The experience of parenting also impacts parents themselves. For instance, parenting can enrich and give focus to parents’ lives; generate stress or calm; and create any number of emotions, including feelings of happiness, sadness, fulfillment, and anger. Parenting of young children today takes place in the context of significant ongoing developments. These include: a rapidly growing body of science on early childhood, increases in funding for programs and services for families, changing demographics of the U.S. population, and greater diversity of family structure. Additionally, parenting is increasingly being shaped by technology and increased access to information about parenting. Parenting Matters identifies parenting knowledge, attitudes, and practices associated with positive developmental outcomes in children ages 0-8; universal/preventive and targeted strategies used in a variety of settings that have been effective with parents of young children and that support the identified knowledge, attitudes, and practices; and barriers to and facilitators for parents’ use of practices that lead to healthy child outcomes as well as their participation in effective programs and services. This report makes recommendations directed at an array of stakeholders, for promoting the wide-scale adoption of effective programs and services for parents and on areas that warrant further research to inform policy and practice. It is meant to serve as a roadmap for the future of parenting policy, research, and practice in the United States.
A dynamic new story about how babies make their way in the world—and how grown-ups have tried to make sense of these tiny inscrutable beings. As a new parent, Nicholas Day had some basic but confounding questions: Why does my son find the straitjacket of his swaddling blanket comforting and not terrifying? How can he never meet a developmental norm and still be OK? And when will he stop sucking my finger? So he went digging for answers. They were not what he expected. Drawing on a wealth of perspectives—scientific, historical, cross-cultural, personal—Baby Meets World is organized around the mundane activities that dominate the life of an infant: sucking, smiling, touching, toddling. From these everyday activities, Day weaves together an account that is anything but ordinary: a fresh, surprising story, both weird and wondrous, about our first experience of the world. Part hidden history of parenthood, part secret lives of babies, Baby Meets World steps back from the moment-to-moment chaos of babydom. It allows readers to see infancy anew in all its strangeness and splendor.
"In this important and conversation-starting book, veteran psychoanalyst Erica Komisar offers a provocative and compelling premise: a mother's emotional and physical presence in her child's life--especially during the first three years--means that her child has a greater chance of growing up emotionally healthy, happy, secure, and resilient. When that essential presence goes missing, the child is at higher risk for social, emotional, and developmental issues, both immediate and long term. Compassionate and balanced, and focusing on the emotional health and well-being of children as well as that of the mothers who care for them, this book shows mothers and fathers how to give their children the best chance for developing into healthy and loving adults. Based on more than two decades of clinical work, established psychoanalytic theory, and the most current and cutting-edge neurobiological research on caregiving, attachment, and brain development, the book explains: - How to establish emotional connection with a newborn or young child--regardless of whether you're able to pause your career to stay home - How to select and train quality childcare if necessary--and how to ease transitions and minimize stress for your baby or toddler - What's true and false about widely held beliefs like "Babies are resilient" and how to combat feelings of post-partum depression or boredom - Why three months of maternity leave is not long enough--and how women and their partners can take control of their choices to provide for their family's emotional needs in the first three years"--
Slow Down. Reconnect. It's Easier than You Think. The hectic pace of everyday life can keep families constantly on the go, but removing some of the frenzy is easy—if you just take a moment to slow down. Hit the pause button on all of life's daily distractions and reconnect with your family in familiar and exciting ways. Parenting and family expert Susan Sachs Lipman shows you the enormous benefits of having a slower paced, more connected family. Packed with simple, affordable, and delightful games, crafts, and activities, Fed Up with Frenzy will help you spend more distraction—free time with your children. Slow down and reconnect with your family by: • Creating your own outdoor theater • Experimenting with kitchen science • Playing nature games • Making placemats from fall leaves • And more! "Fed Up with Frenzy is a blueprint for any family that feels overwhelmed by the pace of contemporary life." —Darell Hammond, Founder and CEO, KaBOOM! "The heart of parenting is connection, but how do parents and children connect when they are going a mile a minute in different directions? Read this book, stop the frenzy, and reconnect." —Lawrence J. Cohen, PhD, author of Playful Parenting "Fed up with Frenzy is a welcome corrective to a society that has turned childhood into a race to nowhere. With charm, energy and wit, Susan Lipman serves up a treasure trove of ideas to bring joy and sanity back to family life. Every parent needs a copy."—Carl Honoré, author of In Praise of Slowness and Under Pressure
Practical, realistic solutions that give parents permission to take their foot off the gas and reclaim a more relaxed family life Mozart in the womb, Baby Einstein DVDs for newborns, and ipad learning apps for toddlers--from the moment the umbilical cord is cut, today's parents feel trapped in a never-ending race to ensure their child is the brightest and the best. But while it's completely natural for us to want our kids to reach their potential, at what point does too much competition become damaging? With constant testing in schools also raising the stakes, how can we tell when hot-housing children is actually doing more harm than good? In this ground-breaking and provocative book, Tanith Carey presents the latest research on what this contest is doing to the next generation. She explains why, far from making our children more go-getting and successful, it can back-fire with life-long repercussions, damage their emotional well-being, and fracture their relationships with the very people who love them most: their parents. Packed with insights, experts' tips, real experiences, and resources, this book is a timely guide to safeguarding your child's well-being in a competitive world, so they can grow into the happy, emotionally balanced people they really need to be.
AUTHORS’ DISCLAIMER: We are not in any way experts on parenting children with disabilities. Our goal is simply to share strategies that have worked for each of us in the event it may help those in a similar situation. If you’re different from us (i.e., you are bright or of the perfect persuasion), we advise you not to try the following at home. On a “perfection-preoccupied planet,” sisters Gina and Patty dare to speak up about the frustrations, sadness, and stigmas they face as parents of children with disabilities (one with Asperger’s syndrome, the other with bipolar disorder). This refreshingly frank book, which will alternately make you want to tear your hair out and laugh your head off, should be required reading for parents of disabled children. Shut Up About Your Perfect Kid provides wise and funny advice about how to: • Find a support group—either online or in your community • Ensure that your child gets the right in-school support • Deal with people—be they friends, family members, or strangers—who say or do insensitive things to you or your child • Find fun, safe, and inclusive extracurricular activities for your child • Battle your own grief and seek professional help if you need it • Keep the rest of the family intact in moments of crisis From the Trade Paperback edition.

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