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On Fridays in the fall, a fog rises from Nancy Creek behind Marist School's Hughes Spalding Stadium and floats across the football field. The apparition, called "the Ghosts of Marist Football," represents the Great Spirit of Marist High School, a school Sports Illustrated ranked number fifteen in its list of top athletic programs in the country. The War Eagle tradition boasts more than six hundred victories, a trophy case filled with championships and thirty straight years of playoff appearances in Georgia high school football, all while playing much larger schools. Join author and Marist alumnus Franklin Cox for three years inside the Spartan-esque tradition and learn why no team dares allow itself to dishonor the glorious roll call of War Eagle history.
Few teams in Georgia high school football can document their history as far back as the Bulldogs. Cedartown High School played its first game at the turn of the century, kicking off a historic tradition that endures today. Join author William Austin, born and raised in Cedartown, as he recounts the history of this proud football program. Austin covers the careers of expert coaches like Doc Ayers and John Hill and highlights the star players and crucial games that helped shape Cedartown's legacy of tough play on the gridiron. From that first game in 1900 to the 1946 conference champions, through the 1963 state champion team and all the way to the 2001 state championship game, here for the first time is the history of Bulldogs football.
"This memoir recounts the experiences of a Marine Corps officer. Each chapter describes a specific event, a story of emotion, or a remarkable person. The reader lives the experience alongside the author's memory, gaining a sense of the pulse-pounding contact, surrealism, pathos, humor, and beauty that defined one of the low points of the American experience"--Provided by publisher.
Every year, Troy and Piqua line up on the gridiron to determine supremacy within Miami County. Stretching back well over a century, it is one of the most-respected rivalries in the state and nation. Even after 130 meetings between the two schools, neither team has been able to gain a decisive edge in the series: the rivalry is tied at 62-62-6. The two teams have battled for league championships, for playoff titles and--most importantly--for bragging rights and pride. This is a story of the most prolific rivalry in the rich history of Ohio high school football, from its nerve-wracking moments to its beloved coaches and players.
“A delight for baseball lovers” (Kirkus Reviews) and “one of the most significant baseball books of the year” (Bob Costas) Ahead of the Curve uses stories from baseball’s present and past to examine why we sometimes choose ignorance over information, and how tradition can trump logic. Forget batting average. Kill the “Win.” Say goodbye to starting pitchers. And please, please stop bunting. MLB Network anchor and commentator Brian Kenny provides “an excellent, entertaining read for the all-around baseball fan” (Library Journal) and shows how baseball has been revolutionized—not destroyed—by analytical thinking. Most people who resist logical thought in baseball preach “tradition” and “respecting the game.” But many of baseball’s traditions go back to the nineteenth century, when the pitcher’s job was to provide the batter with a ball he could hit and fielders played without gloves. Instead of fearing change, Brian Kenny wants fans to think critically, reject outmoded groupthink, and embrace the changes that have come with the sabermetric era. In his entertaining and enlightening book, Kenny discusses why the pitching win-loss record, the Triple Crown, fielding errors, and so-called battling titles should be ignored. He also points out how fossilized sportswriters have been electing the wrong MVP’s and ignoring legitimate candidates for the Hall of Fame; why managers are hired based on their looks; and how the most important position in baseball may just be “Director of Decision Sciences.” “Prepare to have your brain and your assumptions challenged. Guided by data and a deep love of the game, Brian Kenny takes a cutting-edge look at where baseball is and where it is going” (Tom Verducci, Sports Illustrated). Illustrated with unique anecdotes from those who have reshaped the game, Ahead of the Curve is “a great story about the game in the age of information and technology” (Billy Beane).
From the creator/editor of Who Shot Rock & Roll ("I loved this book" --Dwight Garner, The New York Times. "Whatever Gail Buckland writes, I want to read"), a book that brings together the work of 165 extraordinary photographers, most of their images heralded, most of their names unknown; photographs that capture the essence of athletes' mastery of mind/body/soul against the odds, doing the impossible, seeming to defy the laws of gravity, the laws of physics, and showing what human will, discipline, drive, and desire look like when suspended in time. The first book to show the range, cultural importance, and aesthetics of sports photography, much of it legendary, all of it powerful. Here, in more than 280 spectacular images--more than 130 in full color--are great action photographs; portraits of athletes, famous and unknown; athletes off the field and behind the scenes; athletes practicing, working out, the daily relentless effort of training and achieving physical perfection. Buckland writes that sports photographers have always been central to the technical advancement of photography, that they have designed longer lenses, faster shutters, motor drives, underwater casings, and remote controls, allowing us to see what we could never see--and hold on to--with the naked eye. Here are photographs by such masters as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Capa, Danny Lyon, Walker Evans, Annie Leibovitz, and 160 more, names not necessarily known to the public but whose photographic work is considered iconic . . . Here are photographs of Willie Mays . . . Carl Lewis . . . Ian Botham . . . Kobe Bryant . . . Magic Johnson . . . Muhammad Ali . . . Serena Williams . . . Bobby Orr . . . Stirling Moss . . . Jesse Owens . . . Mark Spitz . . . Roger Federer . . . Jackie Robinson. Here is the work of the great sports photographers Neil Leifer, Walter Iooss Jr., Bob Martin, Al Bello, Robert Riger, and Heinz Kleutmeier of Sports Illustrated, who was the first to put a camera at the bottom of an Olympic swimming pool and photograph swimmers from below . . . Here are pictures by Charles Hoff, the New York Daily News photographer of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, whose images of the 1936 Berlin Olympics still inspire shock and awe . . . and those of Ernst Haas, whose innovative color pictures of bullfighting of the 1950s remain poetic evocations of a bloody sport . . . To make the selections for Who Shot Sports, Buckland, a former curator of the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain and Benjamin Menschel Distinguished Visiting Professor at Cooper Union, has drawn upon the work of more than fifty archives, from the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, to Sports Illustrated, Cond� Nast, Getty Images, the National Baseball Hall of Fame, L'�quipe, The New York Times, and the archives of the International Olympic Committee in Lausanne. Here are classic and unknown sports images that capture the uncapturable, that allow us to experience "kinetic beauty," and that give us the essence and meaning--the transcendent power--of sports.
The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, tucked away in upstate New York in a small town called Cooperstown, is far from any major media market or big league stadium. Yet no sports hall of fame’s membership is so hallowed, nor its qualifications so debated, nor its voting process so dissected. Since its founding in 1936, the Hall of Fame’s standards for election have been nebulous, and its selection processes arcane, resulting in confusion among voters, not to mention mistakes in who has been recognized and who has been bypassed. Numerous so-called “greats” have been inducted despite having not been so great, while popular but controversial players such as all-time home run leader Barry Bonds and all-time hits leader Pete Rose are on the outside looking in. Now, in The Cooperstown Casebook, Jay Jaffe shows us how to use his revolutionary ranking system to ensure the right players are recognized. The foundation of Jaffe’s approach is his JAWS system, an acronym for the Jaffe WAR Score, which he developed over a decade ago. Through JAWS, each candidate can be objectively compared on the basis of career and peak value to the players at his position who are already in the Hall of Fame. Because of its utility, JAWS has gained an increasing amount of exposure in recent years. Through his analysis, Jaffe shows why the Hall of Fame still matters and how it can remain relevant in the 21st century.
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