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Many of the most dynamic public companies, from Alibaba to Facebook to Visa, and the most valuable start-ups, such as Airbnb and Uber, are matchmakers that connect one group of customers with another group of customers. Economists call matchmakers multisided platforms because they provide physical or virtual platforms for multiple groups to get together. Dating sites connect people with potential matches, for example, and ride-sharing apps do the same for drivers and riders. Although matchmakers have been around for millennia, they’re becoming more and more popular—and profitable—due to dramatic advances in technology, and a lot of companies that have managed to crack the code of this business model have become today’s power brokers. Don’t let the flashy successes fool you, though. Starting a matchmaker is one of the toughest business challenges, and almost everyone who tries to build one, fails. In Matchmakers, David Evans and Richard Schmalensee, two economists who were among the first to analyze multisided platforms and discover their principles, and who’ve consulted for some of the most successful platform businesses in the world, explain how matchmakers work best in practice, why they do what they do, and how entrepreneurs can improve their chances for success. Whether you’re an entrepreneur, an investor, a consumer, or an executive, your future will involve more and more multisided platforms, and Matchmakers—rich with stories from platform winners and losers—is the one book you’ll need in order to navigate this appealing but confusing world.
Rapid technological advancements have the ability to positively or negatively impact corporate growth and success. Professional leaders and decision makers must consider such advancements when designing and implementing new policies in preparation for the sustainable future of the business environment. Multi-Sided Platforms (MSPs) and Sharing Strategies in the Digital Economy: Emerging Research and Opportunities is a critical scholarly resource that examines platform strategies and business models with a focus on multi-sided platform business models. Featuring coverage on a broad range of topics, such as digital collaboration, business ecosystem, and platform value chain, this book is an ideal resource for managers, researchers, academics, practitioners, and students interested in recent trends in business models in the digital age.
During the last decade, platform businesses such as Uber, Airbnb, Amazon and eBay have been taking over the world. In almost every sector, traditional businesses are under attack from digital disrupters that are effectively harnessing the power of communities. But what exactly is a platform business and why is it different? In Platform Strategy, Laure Claire Reillier and Benoit Reillier provide a practical guide for students, digital entrepreneurs and executives to understand what platforms are, how they work and how you can build one successfully. Using their own "rocket model" and original case studies (including Google, Apple, Amazon), they explain how designing, igniting and scaling a platform business requires learning a whole new set of management rules. Platform Strategy also offers many fascinating insights into the future of platforms, their regulation and governance, as well as how they can be combined with other business models. Benoit Reillier and Laure Claire Reillier are co-founders of Launchworks, a leading advisory firm focused on helping organizations develop and scale innovative business models.
See how the principles of Service Science govern the dynamics driving the adoption of cloud computing in the industry. Cloud as Service shows you how the evolution of enterprise computing platforms to application-specific cloud platforms (ASCPs) have aligned to business needs. You'll also learn processes for developing and building ASCPs. You'll gain insight into how executives, managers, and technologists are utilizing cloud services, cloud service providers, equipment manufacturers, and software and application vendors participating in cloud supply chains. For business, the appeal of cloud computing must go beyond the notion of convenient, on-demand access of networked pooled access to computing resources. Industry leaders have learned to apply cloud computing to become more nimble, cost effective, and customer engaging as they strive for competitive advantage, regardless of size. These companies define and build cloud platforms customized for their needs rather than using someone else’s. This book shows you how to use a holistic, end-to-end view of platform planning, platform development, supply chains and operations to collapse platform development times to a fraction of the original time. You’ll see that strategies for selling to the cloud market are essentially incomplete; and that in order to be successful, businesses must become cloud service businesses themselves, incorporating cloud technologies in their engineering, IT, sales and marketing, and delivery processes. What You'll Learn: Historical perspective to provide insight into the dynamics driving cloud evolution today State of the art in IT requirements and cloud solutions The value of User Experience (UX) driven design principles The crucial roles of Service Brokers and Service Assurance Managers The landscape of emerging cloud services and what they mean to your enterprise Service Portals and Enterprise Service Buses Who This Book Is For: CIOs, CTOs, data center architects, solution architects and application engineers Educational institutions building a systems integration curriculum Developers who want to understand how their work fits in the cloud ecosystem
Markets have long been acknowledged to be a superior mechanism for managing resources but until the advent of big data, they largely functioned better in theory than in practice. Now, as ideal markets are within reach because of vastly greater access to information, we are on the verge of a major disruption. As data becomes a more valuable asset than cash, the rules for surviving and thriving are changing. Reinventing Capitalism is a provocative look at how data is reinventing markets and, in so doing, is ushering in an era where the firm is no longer predominant. With richer and more comprehensive information about human wants and needs, an economy powered by data offers the possibility of increased abundance, equality, and resilience. The data-driven markets that will thrive in this environment are far better than firms at organizing human endeavors, meaning that finance driven capitalism is being displaced by its more efficient, moresustainable, and more democratic disruptor: data capitalism.
Doctoral Thesis / Dissertation from the year 2011 in the subject Economics - Macro-economics, general, European Business School - International University Schloss Reichartshausen Oestrich-Winkel (Department of Governance and Economics), language: English, abstract: This thesis strives to offer new insights in two main areas. First, it investigates the fact that merchant usage fees for payment card services differ substantially among merchant sectors. Second, it identifies the smart (electricity) meter market as a multi-sided market and applies the insights found in the literature to better regulate a market-driven rollout of smart meters. Chapter 2 examines the determination of the merchant usage fee of a monopolistic unitary payment card network based on the characteristics of the downstream market. Merchants engage in Bertrand competition that allows for an observation of heterogeneous products. My coauthor and I find that the payment card network extracts a part of the economic rent that merchants obtain. The rent, and consequently the merchant usage fee, is increasing in the downstream market size, but decreasing in the price elasticity of consumer demand, as well as in the substitutability of products, and in the fraction of consumers who prefer card payments. Chapter 3 undertakes a similar analysis for Cournot competition among merchants. The merchant usage fee is decreasing in terms of the price elasticity of demand and has an inverse V relationship with regard to the fraction of card users. At first, increasing the fraction of cardholders makes accepting cards more attractive for merchants because of the increased sales. At some point, however, the higher costs of handling card transactions outweighs the benefit of increased revenue. Further, card companies can increase profits by influencing consumers to use their cards in sectors with a low price elasticity of demand where they can then tax a merchant's profits more heavily. Chapter 4 looks at smart mete"
In an economy where markets, consumers, and technology are ever-changing and increasingly interdependent, economic catalysts – businesses that bring together a number of groups who need each other and make it easy for them to work together – are essential. Think of the credit card industry. This trillion dollar industry brings merchants and consumers together. Google creates value for its customers, and makes billions for itself, by bringing searchers and advertisers together. Companies that do this right – and transform their pricing practices, incentive plans, and organizational structures – are today's power brokers. Of course, catalysts have been around as long as marketplaces. But now, more than ever, they drive the economy. Doing business in this world isn’t for the faint of heart – butCatalyst Codemaps it out, showing where the opportunities – and pitfalls – lie.

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