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"[D]esigned primarily for Hispanic bilingual students whose home language is Spanish but whose dominant and school language is English. Depending on the students' abilities, it can be used in intermediate or advanced courses"--P. v.
A childhood in a privileged household in 1950s Havana was joyous and cruel, like any other-but with certain differences. The neighbour's monkey was liable to escape and run across your roof. Surfing was conducted by driving cars across the breakwater. Lizards and firecrackers made frequent contact. Carlos Eire's childhood was a little different from most. His father was convinced he had been Louis XVI in a past life. At school, classmates with fathers in the Batista government were attended by chauffeurs and bodyguards. At a home crammed with artifacts and paintings, portraits of Jesus spoke to him in dreams and nightmares. Then, in January 1959, the world changes: Batista is suddenly gone, a cigar-smoking guerrilla has taken his place, and Christmas is cancelled. The echo of firing squads is everywhere. And, one by one, the author's schoolmates begin to disappear-spirited away to the United States. Carlos will end up there himself, without his parents, never to see his father again. Narrated with the urgency of a confession, WAITING FOR SNOW IN HAVANA is both an ode to a paradise lost and an exorcism. More than that, it captures the terrible beauty of those times in our lives when we are certain we have died-and then are somehow, miraculously, reborn.
In his 2003 National Book Award–winning memoir Waiting for Snow in Havana, Carlos Eire narrated his coming of age in Cuba just before and during the Castro revolution. That book literally ends in midair as eleven-year-old Carlos and his older brother leave Havana on an airplane—along with thousands of other children—to begin their new life in Miami in 1962. It would be years before he would see his mother again. He would never again see his beloved father. Learning to Die in Miami opens as the plane lands and Carlos faces, with trepidation and excitement, his new life. He quickly realizes that in order for his new American self to emerge, his Cuban self must "die." And so, with great enterprise and purpose, he begins his journey. We follow Carlos as he adjusts to life in his new home. Faced with learning English, attending American schools, and an uncertain future, young Carlos confronts the age-old immigrant’s plight: being surrounded by American bounty, but not able to partake right away. The abundance America has to offer excites him and, regardless of how grim his living situation becomes, he eagerly forges ahead with his own personal assimilation program, shedding the vestiges of his old life almost immediately, even changing his name to Charles. Cuba becomes a remote and vague idea in the back of his mind, something he used to know well, but now it "had ceased to be part of the world." But as Carlos comes to grips with his strange surroundings, he must also struggle with everyday issues of growing up. His constant movement between foster homes and the eventual realization that his parents are far away in Cuba bring on an acute awareness that his life has irrevocably changed. Flashing back and forth between past and future, we watch as Carlos balances the divide between his past and present homes and finds his way in this strange new world, one that seems to hold the exhilarating promise of infinite possibilities and one that he will eventually claim as his own. An exorcism and an ode, Learning to Die in Miami is a celebration of renewal—of those times when we’re certain we have died and then are somehow, miraculously, reborn.
This book defines and develops the generalized adjoint of an input-output system. It is the result of a theoretical development and examination of the generalized adjoint concept and the conditions under which systems analysis using adjoints is valid. Results developed in this book are useful aids for the analysis and modeling of physical systems, including the development of guidance and control algorithms and in developing simulations. The generalized adjoint system is defined and is patterned similarly to adjoints of bounded linear transformations. Next the elementary properties of the generalized adjoint system are derived. For a space of input-output systems, a generalized adjoint map from this space of systems to the space of generalized adjoints is defined. Then properties of the generalized adjoint map are derived. Afterward the author demonstrates that the inverse of an input-output system may be represented in terms of the generalized adjoint. The use of generalized adjoints to determine bounds for undesired inputs such as noise and disturbance to an input-output system is presented and methods which parallel adjoints in linear systems theory are utilized. Finally, an illustrative example is presented which utilizes an integral operator representation for the system mapping.
Many students enter graduate programs with little or no experience of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Efforts to impart clinical skills have often been less than systematic and beginning psychotherapists have not always been encouraged to think about what they are doing and why they are doing it from a scientific standpoint. Thoughtfully building on current debates over efficacy and effectiveness, this book outlines a promising approach to training in which the work of therapy is divided into tasks patterned after Luborsky's influential delineation of "curative factors"--significant developments in the course of the therapy that are crucial for effective change. Each task step for the therapist-cognitive, behavioral, affective, or a combination--is analyzed, taught separately, and then put in sequence with the other task steps. Curative factors have been extensively studied in recent years and the approach rests on a solid empirical base. In a climate of increased accountability, clinicians must demonstrate that they are responding to providers' requests to conduct evidence-based practices. Core Processes in Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy will be an invaluable resource not only for students and trainees, but for established therapists who find themselves asked to justify their work.
"A Thousand Deaths Plus One" is the narrative of a search for the lost history of an obscure Nicaraguan photographer named Juan Castellón. In 1987, the author/narrator, while on an state visit to Poland, happened upon an exhibition of hitherto unknown photographs by Castellón, who had pursued a career in Europe between roughly 1870 and 1940. The discovery initiates an obsessive quest to recover the lost artist's history¿a quest that eventually carries the author from Vienna to Mallorca with points in between as he sifts through a trove of documentary evidence concerning a raffish cast of European and Central American characters. In alternating chapters Castellón offers his own story, from his bizarre conception in Nicaragua, to his education in France, to his nights of serious drinking with Rubén Darío, and lastly to a compromised finale in Nazi Germany. The result is a novel that may be said to personify the tragi-comic history of Nicaragua.
Dona Barbara tells the tale of an epic struggle between two cousins for a cast estate and ranch in the Venezuelan llano, or prairie...Published in 1929 and all but forgotten by Anglophone readers, Dona Barbara is one of the first examples of magical realism, laying the groundwork for later authors such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Mario Vargas Llosa.

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