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In 1942, YIVO held a contest for the best autobiography by a Jewish immigrant on the theme “Why I Left the Old Country and What I Have Accomplished in America.” Chosen from over two hundred entries, and translated from Yiddish, the nine life stories in My Future Is in America provide a compelling portrait of American Jewish life in the immigrant generation at the turn of the twentieth century. The writers arrived in America in every decade from the 1890s to the 1920s. They include manual workers, shopkeepers, housewives, communal activists, and professionals who came from all parts of Eastern Europe and ushered in a new era in American Jewish history. In their own words, the immigrant writers convey the complexities of the transition between the Old and New Worlds. An Introduction places the writings in historical and literary context, and annotations explain historical and cultural allusions made by the writers. This unique volume introduces readers to the complex world of Yiddish-speaking immigrants while at the same time elucidating important themes and topics of interest to those in immigration studies, ethnic studies, labor history, and literary studies. Published in conjunction with the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.
The very question of “what do Jews think about the goyim” has fascinated Jews and Gentiles, anti-Semites and philo-Semites alike. Much has been written about immigrant Jews in nineteenth- and twentieth-century New York City, but Gil Ribak’s critical look at the origins of Jewish liberalism in America provides a more complicated and nuanced picture of the Americanization process. Gentile New York examines these newcomers’ evolving feelings toward non-Jews through four critical decades in the American Jewish experience. Ribak considers how they perceived Gentiles in general as well as such different groups as “Yankees” (a common term for WASPs in many Yiddish sources), Germans, Irish, Italians, Poles, and African Americans. As they discovered the complexity of America’s racial relations, the immigrants found themselves at odds with “white” American values or behavior and were drawn instead into cooperative relationships with other minorities. Sparked with many previously unknown anecdotes, quotations, and events, Ribak’s research relies on an impressive number of memoirs, autobiographies, novels, newspapers, and journals culled from both sides of the Atlantic.
Migration and forcible displacement are growing and impactful dynamics of the current global age. These processes generate mobility flows, travel patterns and touristic behaviour driven by personal and collective memories. The chapters in this book highlight the importance of travel and tourism for enabling such memories and memory-based identity practices to unfold. This book investigates how diasporic communities, transnational migrants, refugees and the internally displaced recreate home in their host place of residence through material culture, performativity and social relations; and how involuntary tangible and intangible stimuli evoke memories of home. It explores an array of diverse geographical contexts, balancing ethnographic vignettes of contemporary migrant societies with archival research providing historical accounts that reach back more than a century. Memory, Migration and Travel makes an original contribution by linking the emergent field of memory studies to the disciplines of tourism and migration/diaspora studies, and will be of interest to students and researchers in the fields of tourism, geography, migration/diaspora studies, anthropology and sociology.
A panoramic introduction to religion in America, newly revised and updated

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