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Southeast Asia has a population of more than half a billion, yetits economy is dominated by about 40 families, most of OverseasChinese descent. Their conglomerates span sectors as diverse asreal estate, telecommunications, hotels, industrial goods,computers and sugar plantations. New Asian Emperors showshow and why Overseas Chinese companies continue to dominate theregion and have extended their reach in East Asia, despite theAsian financial and SARS crises of the past decade. The authorsbase their conclusions on in-depth structured interviews spanning adecade with the often elusive Overseas Chinese CEOs including LiKa-shing, Stan Shih, Victor Fung, Stephen Riady and Sukanto Tanoto,as well as on the strategic information that their companies use. The analysis of the New Asian Emperors’ present-daymanagement techniques and practices draws on the history, cultureand philosophical perspectives of the Overseas Chinese in SoutheastAsia. In the midst of today’s global economic crisis, thisbook also takes a fresh look at the role and management practicesof the Overseas Chinese as they continue to create some ofAsia’s wealthiest and most successful companies. New Asian Emperors explains: The sources and characteristics of Overseas Chinesemanagement Whether Overseas Chinese management practices will spread inthe same way that Japanese management did in the 1970s Whether Western management technologies have found themselvesoutmaneuvered in Asia’s post-crisis arena The Overseas Chinese managers’ strategies for theinformational black hole of Southeast Asia and what Westernmanagers can learn from them The New Asian Emperors’ unique strategic perspectivesand management styles revealed through exclusive, in-depthinterviews The implications for successfully co-operating and competingwith the Overseas Chinese of Southeast Asia New Asian Emperors offers key insights into the OverseasChinese and the important role that cultural roots play in theirdominance of Southeast Asian business.
Much has been written about the rise of the Asian economies in recent decades, and their coming economic dominance in the next century. The New Asian Emperors shows how and why overseas Chinese companies are achieving dominance in the Asia Pacific. In the wake of the Asian Currency crisis, this book takes a fresh look at the role of the overseas Chinese as they continue to create some of Asia's most wealthy and successful companies. In particular, the authors tackle the principal difference between Western and Eastern business practices. The overseas Chinese, due to their origins and history developed a unique form of management - now they maintain it as their competitive advantage. Although Asian governments are currently floundering, the overseas Chinese networks continue to prosper. The authors explain the following to Eastern and Western managers: the sources and characteristics of overseas Chinese management, how to combat the overseas Chinese, the strengths and exploitable weaknesses of the overseas Chinese, whether overseas Chinese management practices will spread in the same way as Japanese management did, whether Western management technologies will find themselves outclassed. A feature of the book are the exclusive, in-depth interviews with the New Asian Emperors since most of them avoid the press and little is known of them.
With much of the "Asian Miracle" destroyed and much of the Western world's awe for Asian ways of managment dissipated, organizations in East Asia are changing with such speed that most of our knowledge about them becomes quickly outdated. Richter takes stock of East Asian management practices, as they are perceived so far, and he discusses the strategies proposed by others to help Asian management redesign itself for the future--including a long-term agenda for change based on the cultural heritage of Confucianism. He shows how Asian firms adjusted to the Asian economic crisis and how a hybrid style of management is emerging, one which combines elements of Western and Eastern thinking. The result is a challenging, intensely pragmatic analysis for corporate decision makers at all levels, in all countries and cultures, and it is a necessary new stone in the foundation of academic research and thought.
This comprehensive guide to the Pacific and South Asia provides detailed and enlightening information about the many ethnic groups of this increasingly important region of the world.
C. Patterson Giersch provides a groundbreaking challenge to the China-centered narrative of the Qing conquest through comparative frontier history and a pioneering use of indigenous sources. He focuses on the Tai domains of China's Yunnan frontier, part of the politically fluid borderlands, where local, indigenous leaders were crucial actors in an arena of imperial rivalry. Patterns of acculturation were multi-directional. Both Qing and Tai created a hybrid frontier government that was tested as Burma and Siam extended influence into the region. As Qing and Chinese migrants gained greater political and economic control in borderland communities, indigenes adopted select Chinese ways. Chinese language was useful for trade, and relations with imperial officials were eased by wearing the queue and donning imperial robes. But indigenous culture and livelihoods persisted, and Tai aristocrats adopted rituals and symbols of the Burmese and Siamese courts. Qing conquest and Chinese migration did not lead to simple patterns of incorporation and assimilation. Chinese economic and cultural influences were profound, but did not entirely undermine indigenous practices. These legacies, which would shape and complicate twentieth-century Chinese state building, hold an important key to understanding modern China.
New Qing Imperial History uses the Manchu summer capital of Chengde and associated architecture, art and ritual activity as the focus for an exploration of the importance of Inner Asia and Tibet to the Qing Empire (1636-1911). Well-known contributors argue that the Qing was not simply another Chinese dynasty, but was deeply engaged in Inner Asia not only militarily, but culturally, politically and ideologically. Emphasizing the diverse range of peoples in the Qing empire, this book analyzes the importance to Chinese history of Manchu relations with Tibetan prelates, Mongolian chieftains, and the Turkic elites of Xinjiang. In offering a new appreciation of a culturally and politically complex period, the authors discuss the nature and representation of emperorship, especially under Qianlong (r. 1736-1795), and examine the role of ritual in relations with Inner Asia, including the vaunted (but overrated) tribute system. By using a specific artifact or text as a starting point for analysis in each chapter, the contributors not only include material previously unavailable in English but allow the reader an intimate knowledge of life at Chengde and its significance to the Qing period as a whole.
City Government in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor examines the social and administrative transformation of Greek society within the early Roman empire, assessing the extent to which the numerous changes in Greek cities during the imperial period ought to be attributed to Roman influence. The topic is crucial to our understanding of the foundations of Roman imperial power because Greek speakers comprised the empire's second largest population group and played a vital role in its administration, culture, and social life. This book elucidates the transformation of Greek society in this period from a local point of view, mostly through the study of local sources such as inscriptions and coins. By providing information on public activities, education, family connections, and individual careers, it shows the extent of and geographical variation in Greek provincial reaction to the changes accompanying the establishment of Roman rule. In general, new local administrative and social developments during the period were most heavily influenced by traditional pre-Roman practices, while innovations were few and of limited importance. Concentrating on the province of Asia, one of the most urbanized Greek-speaking provinces of Rome, this work demonstrates that Greek local administration remained diverse under the Romans, while at the same time local Greek nobility gradually merged with the Roman ruling class into one imperial elite. This conclusion interprets the interference of Roman authorities in local administration as a form of interaction between different segments of the imperial elite, rejecting the old explanation of such interference as a display of Roman control over subjects.

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