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The theory of motives began in the early 1960s when Grothendieck envisioned the existence of a "universal cohomology theory of algebraic varieties". The theory of noncommutative motives is more recent. It began in the 1980s when the Moscow school (Beilinson, Bondal, Kapranov, Manin, and others) began the study of algebraic varieties via their derived categories of coherent sheaves, and continued in the 2000s when Kontsevich conjectured the existence of a "universal invariant of noncommutative algebraic varieties". This book, prefaced by Yuri I. Manin, gives a rigorous overview of some of the main advances in the theory of noncommutative motives. It is divided into three main parts. The first part, which is of independent interest, is devoted to the study of DG categories from a homotopical viewpoint. The second part, written with an emphasis on examples and applications, covers the theory of noncommutative pure motives, noncommutative standard conjectures, noncommutative motivic Galois groups, and also the relations between these notions and their commutative counterparts. The last part is devoted to the theory of noncommutative mixed motives. The rigorous formalization of this latter theory requires the language of Grothendieck derivators, which, for the reader's convenience, is revised in a brief appendix.
This volume contains the proceedings of the Second Mid-Atlantic Topology Conference, held from March 12–13, 2016, at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. The focus of the conference, and subsequent papers, was on applications of innovative methods from homotopy theory in category theory, algebraic geometry, and related areas, emphasizing the work of younger researchers in these fields.
The algebraic geometry community has a tradition of running a summer research institute every ten years. During these influential meetings a large number of mathematicians from around the world convene to overview the developments of the past decade and to outline the most fundamental and far-reaching problems for the next. The meeting is preceded by a Bootcamp aimed at graduate students and young researchers. This volume collects ten surveys that grew out of the Bootcamp, held July 6–10, 2015, at University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah. These papers give succinct and thorough introductions to some of the most important and exciting developments in algebraic geometry in the last decade. Included are descriptions of the striking advances in the Minimal Model Program, moduli spaces, derived categories, Bridgeland stability, motivic homotopy theory, methods in characteristic and Hodge theory. Surveys contain many examples, exercises and open problems, which will make this volume an invaluable and enduring resource for researchers looking for new directions.
The unifying theme of this book is the interplay among noncommutative geometry, physics, and number theory. The two main objects of investigation are spaces where both the noncommutative and the motivic aspects come to play a role: space-time, where the guiding principle is the problem of developing a quantum theory of gravity, and the space of primes, where one can regard the Riemann Hypothesis as a long-standing problem motivating the development of new geometric tools. The book stresses the relevance of noncommutative geometry in dealing with these two spaces. The first part of the book deals with quantum field theory and the geometric structure of renormalization as a Riemann-Hilbert correspondence. It also presents a model of elementary particle physics based on noncommutative geometry. The main result is a complete derivation of the full Standard Model Lagrangian from a very simple mathematical input. Other topics covered in the first part of the book are a noncommutative geometry model of dimensional regularization and its role in anomaly computations, and a brief introduction to motives and their conjectural relation to quantum field theory. The second part of the book gives an interpretation of the Weil explicit formula as a trace formula and a spectral realization of the zeros of the Riemann zeta function. This is based on the noncommutative geometry of the adèle class space, which is also described as the space of commensurability classes of Q-lattices, and is dual to a noncommutative motive (endomotive) whose cyclic homology provides a general setting for spectral realizations of zeros of L-functions. The quantum statistical mechanics of the space of Q-lattices, in one and two dimensions, exhibits spontaneous symmetry breaking. In the low-temperature regime, the equilibrium states of the corresponding systems are related to points of classical moduli spaces and the symmetries to the class field theory of the field of rational numbers and of imaginary quadratic fields, as well as to the automorphisms of the field of modular functions. The book ends with a set of analogies between the noncommutative geometries underlying the mathematical formulation of the Standard Model minimally coupled to gravity and the moduli spaces of Q-lattices used in the study of the zeta function.
Quantum groups and quantum algebras as well as non-commutative differential geometry are important in mathematics and considered to be useful tools for model building in statistical and quantum physics. This book, addressing scientists and postgraduates, contains a detailed and rather complete presentation of the algebraic framework. Introductory chapters deal with background material such as Lie and Hopf superalgebras, Lie super-bialgebras, or formal power series. Great care was taken to present a reliable collection of formulae and to unify the notation, making this volume a useful work of reference for mathematicians and mathematical physicists.
Arithmetic noncommutative geometry uses ideas and tools from noncommutative geometry to address questions in a new way and to reinterpret results and constructions from number theory and arithmetic algebraic geometry. This general philosophy is applied to the geometry and arithmetic of modular curves and to the fibers at Archimedean places of arithmetic surfaces and varieties. Noncommutative geometry can be expected to say something about topics of arithmetic interest because it provides the right framework for which the tools of geometry continue to make sense on spaces that are very singular and apparently very far from the world of algebraic varieties. This provides a way of refining the boundary structure of certain classes of spaces that arise in the context of arithmetic geometry. With a foreword written by Yuri Manin and a brief introduction to noncommutative geometry, this book offers a comprehensive account of the cross fertilization between two important areas, noncommutative geometry and number theory. It is suitable for graduate students and researchers interested in these areas

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