Download Free Novel Raising Cain Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Novel Raising Cain and write the review.

Cain made the first blackface turn, blackface minstrels liked to say of the first man forced to wander the world acting out his low place in life. It wasn't the "approved" reading, but then, blackface wasn't the "approved" culture either--yet somehow we're still dancing to its renegade tune. The story of an insubordinate, rebellious, truly popular culture stretching from Jim Crow to hip hop is told for the first time in Raising Cain, a provocative look at how the outcasts of official culture have made their own place in the world. Unearthing a wealth of long-buried plays and songs, rethinking materials often deemed too troubling or lowly to handle, and overturning cherished ideas about classics from Uncle Tom's Cabin to Benito Cereno to The Jazz Singer, W. T. Lhamon Jr. sets out a startlingly original history of blackface as a cultural ritual that, for all its racist elements, was ultimately liberating. He shows that early blackface, dating back to the 1830s, put forward an interpretation of blackness as that which endured a commonly felt scorn and often outwitted it. To follow the subsequent turns taken by the many forms of blackface is to pursue the way modern social shifts produce and disperse culture. Raising Cain follows these forms as they prolong and adapt folk performance and popular rites for industrial commerce, then project themselves into the rougher modes of postmodern life through such heirs of blackface as stand-up comedy, rock 'n' roll, talk TV, and hip hop. Formally raising Cain in its myriad variants, blackface appears here as a racial project more radical even than abolitionism. Lhamon's account of its provenance and persistence is a major reinterpretation of American culture.
The stunning success of Reviving Ophelia, Mary Pipher's landmark book, showed a true and pressing need to address the emotional lives of girls. Now, finally, here is the book that answers our equally timely and critical need to understand our boys. In Raising Cain, Dan Kindlon, Ph.D., and Michael Thompson, Ph.D., two of the country's leading child psychologists, share what they have learned in more than thirty-five years of combined experience working with boys and their families. They reveal a nation of boys who are hurting--sad, afraid, angry, and silent. Statistics point to an alarming number of young boys at high risk for suicide, alcohol and drug abuse, violence and loneliness. Kindlon and Thompson set out to answer this basic, crucial question: What do boys need that they're not getting? They illuminate the forces that threaten our boys, teaching them to believe that "cool" equals macho strength and stoicism. Cutting through outdated theories of "mother blame," "boy biology," and "testosterone," Kindlon and Thompson shed light on the destructive emotional training our boys receive--the emotional miseducation of boys. Through moving case studies and cutting-edge research, Raising Cain paints a portrait of boys systematically steered away from their emotional lives by adults and the peer "culture of cruelty"--boys who receive little encouragement to develop qualities such as compassion, sensitivity, and warmth. The good news is that this doesn't have to happen. There is much we can do to prevent it. Kindlon and Thompson make a compelling case that emotional literacy is the most valuable gift we can offer our sons, urging parents to recognize the price boys pay when we hold them to an impossible standard of manhood. They identify the social and emotional challenges that boys encounter in school and show how parents can help boys cultivate emotional awareness and empathy--giving them the vital connections and support they need to navigate the social pressures of youth. Powerfully written and deeply felt, Raising Cain will forever change the way we see our sons and will transform the way we help them to become happy and fulfilled young men. From the Hardcover edition.
His father's death on a deserted road is regarded as a natural passing, but Sergeant Joe Brown suspects foul play. He has his suspicions, and when his prime suspect is suddenly found dead too, he is charged with the murder. With Brown's reputation and career at stake, it's up to prosecutor Gardner Lawson to defeat flamboyant defense attorney Kent King in a trial that will take many shocking twists and turns before arriving at its shattering conclusion.
“Beside oneself,” “as old as the hills,” “the kiss of death,” “see eye to eye,” and “raising Cain” are all expressions most English speakers understand and use in conversation. If you asked someone what these phrases have in common, few would be able to say that they all come from the Bible. Even in a secular, post-Christian age the imprint of the Bible, and especially the King James Version, is pervasive and profound. A distinguished professor of literature has said, “the King James Version of the Bible is the most influential English book ever printed.” Its themes have influenced the arts, constitutions, laws, and everyday language. In Raising Cain. Dr. Wayne Harvey provides fascinating documen- tation of the echoes of the King James Bible on the tongues of and in the writings of 21st century English speakers. His entry on “Raising Cain” shows how this treasury of biblical expressions works: Raise Cain (See also “Cain and Abel” and “Cain, Mark of”) To create a disturbance. One sense of raise in old English is to conjure up. To raise Cain is to bring up or express the spirit of Cain. But unto Cain and to his offering he had not respect. And Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell. And the LORD said unto Cain, Why art thou wroth? and why is thy countenance fallen? If thou doest well, shalt thou not be accepted? and if thou doest not well, sin lieth at the door. And unto thee shall be his desire, and thou shalt rule over him (Genesis 4:5-7).
Meet Kid Kane. The youngest brother, the passionate one, the one who lives with his soul exposed—he’s never met a woman he can’t seduce. When the spirit fever struck a town, a village or an outpost, it left few if any survivors. The white man blamed the Indian saying they used their mojo on them. The Indians blamed the white man for angering the spirits. The survivors knew it didn’t matter. The Fevered were forever changed. A gift he needs to tame… Kid feels what the world around him feels, he is a raw, bleeding nerve, and he can’t control the pain anymore. After lashing out at everyone he loves, he agrees to an exile atop Quanto’s mountain to learn to control the power he wields. Desperate to end it, Kid battles with Wyatt the eldest Morning Star—hoping against hope that the man will kill him. He longs only for peace… A gift she wants to harness… Evelyn Lang grew up with a territorial judge for a father, and a secret—her father’s Fevered ability passed to her. When he’s killed in broad daylight in a little town in Kansas after freeing a slave, Lang is no longer bound by her father’s oath to never use her ability—now she must train it. She travels across hostile territory in search of the man who trained her father. She longs only for vengeance… Tempestuous passions, opposing needs, and impulsive decisions divide them… Conflicting goals put Kid and Evelyn in direct opposition. Her hunger for justice cuts him, but Quanto refuses his requests to train alone. Forced to train together, they must confront their deepest fears if they are ever to achieve their greatest desire…. His pain. Her obsession. Their battle.
Dozens of authentic parent-sibling scenarios are enacted twice--the way parents usually handle them and the right way--in a child psychiatrist's examination of sibling rivalry which shows such rivalry to be normal, universal, and valuable
A provocative, deeply researched investigation into Twain's writing of Huckleberry Finn challenges basic understandings to argue its reflection of period fears about youth violence, education, pop culture and parenting. 35,000 first printing.

Best Books