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Sunstein explores the human propensity for gossip and storytelling, and discusses how our fears and hopes can work against common sense. He also investigates the way that the internet can entrench our false beliefs even deeper, and how the wish to conform, our natural biases and even our basic emotions can cause us to fall for untrue accounts.
Conspiracy theories are inevitable in complex human societies. And while they have always been with us, their ubiquity in our political discourse is nearly unprecedented. Their salience has increased for a variety of reasons including the increasing access to information among ordinary people, a pervasive sense of powerlessness among those same people, and a widespread distrust of elites. Working in combination, these factors and many other factors are now propelling conspiracy theories into our public sphere on a vast scale. In recent years, scholars have begun to study this genuinely important phenomenon in a concerted way. In Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them, Joseph E. Uscinski has gathered forty top researchers on the topic to provide both the foundational tools and the evidence to better understand conspiracy theories in the United States and around the world. Each chapter is informed by three core questions: Why do so many people believe in conspiracy theories? What are the effects of such theories when they take hold in the public? What can or should be done about the phenomenon? Combining systematic analysis and cutting-edge empirical research, this volume will help us better understand an extremely important, yet relatively neglected, phenomenon.
What can we know and what should we believe about today′s world? What to Believe Now: Applying Epistemology to Contemporary Issues applies the concerns and techniques of epistemology to a wide variety of contemporary issues. Questions about what we can know–and what we should believe–are first addressed through an explicit consideration of the practicalities of working these issues out at the dawn of the twenty–first century. Coady calls for an ′applied turn′ in epistemology, a process he likens to the applied turn that transformed the study of ethics in the early 1970s. Subjects dealt with include: Experts–how can we recognize them? And when should we trust them? Rumors–should they ever be believed? And can they, in fact, be a source of knowledge? Conspiracy theories–when, if ever, should they be believed, and can they be known to be true? The blogosphere–how does it compare with traditional media as a source of knowledge and justified belief? Timely, thought provoking, and controversial, What to Believe Now offers a wealth of insights into a branch of philosophy of growing importance–and increasing relevance–in the twenty–first century.
Simpler government arrived four years ago. It helped put money in your pocket. It saved hours of your time. It improved your children’s diet, lengthened your life span, and benefited businesses large and small. It did so by issuing fewer regulations, by insisting on smarter regulations, and by eliminating or improving old regulations. Cass R. Sunstein, as administrator of the most powerful White House office you’ve never heard of, oversaw it and explains how it works, why government will never be the same again (thank goodness), and what must happen in the future. Cutting-edge research in behavioral economics has influenced business and politics. Long at the forefront of that research, Sunstein, for three years President Obama’s “regulatory czar” heading the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, oversaw a far-reaching restructuring of America’s regulatory state. In this highly anticipated book, Sunstein pulls back the curtain to show what was done, why Americans are better off as a result, and what the future has in store. The evidence is all around you, and more is coming soon. Simplified mortgages and student loan applications. Scorecards for colleges and universities. Improved labeling of food and energy-efficient appliances and cars. Calories printed on chain restaurant menus. Healthier food in public schools. Backed by historic executive orders ensuring transparency and accountability, simpler government can be found in new initiatives that save money and time, improve health, and lengthen lives. Simpler: The Future of Government will transform what you think government can and should accomplish.
Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the bestselling author of The Black Swan and one of the foremost thinkers of our time, reveals how to thrive in an uncertain world. Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, many things in life benefit from stress, disorder, volatility, and turmoil. What Taleb has identified and calls antifragile are things that not only gain from chaos but need it in order to survive and flourish. In The Black Swan, Taleb showed us that highly improbable and unpredictable events underlie almost everything about our world. Here Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary. The antifragile is beyond the resilient or robust. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better. What's more, the antifragile is immune to prediction errors and protected from adverse events. Why is the city-state better than the nation-state, why is debt bad for you, and why is what we call "efficient" not efficient at all? Why do government responses and social policies protect the strong and hurt the weak? Why should you write your resignation letter before starting on the job? How did the sinking of the Titanic save lives? The book spans innovation by trial and error, life decisions, politics, urban planning, war, personal finance, economic systems and medicine, drawing on modern street wisdom and ancient sources. Antifragile is a blueprint for living in a Black Swan world. Erudite, witty, and iconoclastic, Taleb's message is revolutionary: the antifragile, and only the antifragile, will make it. Nassim Nicholas Taleb has devoted his life to problems of uncertainty, probability, and knowledge and has led three careers around this focus, as a businessman-trader, a philosophical essayist, and an academic researcher. Although he now spends most of his time working in intense seclusion in his study, in the manner of independent scholars, he is currently Distinguished Professor of Risk Engineering at New York University's Polytechnic Institute. His main subject matter is "decision making under opacity," that is, a map and a protocol on how we should live in a world we don't understand. His books Fooled by Randomness and The Black Swan have been published in thirty-three languages. Taleb believes that prizes, honorary degrees, awards, and ceremonialism debase knowledge by turning it into a spectator sport.
Donald Trump in Action – im Business, im Alltag, mit seinen Freunden, seinen Geschäftspartnern, seiner Familie. Hier finden Sie seine elf goldenen Regeln, destilliert aus seinen großartigsten Deals. Das ultimative Lesevergnügen für jeden, der Geld verdienen und erfolgreich sein möchte. Und seit dem 20. Januar 2017 auch für jeden, der verstehen möchte, wie der mächtigste Mann der Welt denkt.
Am 9. Oktober 2012 wird die junge Pakistanerin Malala Yousafzai auf ihrem Schulweg überfallen und niedergeschossen. Die Fünfzehnjährige hatte sich den Taliban widersetzt, die Mädchen verbieten, zur Schule zu gehen. Wie durch ein Wunder kommt Malala mit dem Leben davon. Als im Herbst 2013 ihr Buch "Ich bin Malala" erscheint, ist die Resonanz enorm: Weltweit wird über ihr Schicksal berichtet. Im Juli 2013 hält sie eine beeindruckende Rede vor den Vereinten Nationen. Barack Obama empfängt sie im Weißen Haus, und im Dezember erhält sie den Sacharow-Preis für geistige Freiheit, verliehen vom Europäischen Parlament. Malala Yousafzai lebt heute mit ihrer Familie in England, wo sie wieder zur Schule geht. Malala Yousafzai wird mit dem Friedensnobelpreis 2014 ausgezeichnet. »Dieses Memoir unterstreicht ihre besten Eigenschaften. Ihren Mut und ihre Entschlossenheit kann man nur bewundern. Ihr Hunger nach Bildung und Neugestaltung ist authentisch. Sie wirkt so unschuldig, und da ist diese unverwüstliche Zuversicht. Sie spricht mit einem solchen Gewicht, dass man vergisst, dass Malala erst 16 ist.« The Times »Niemand hat das Recht auf Bildung so knapp, so einprägsam und überzeugend zusammengefasst wie Malala Yousafzai, die tapferste Schülerin der Welt.« Berliner Zeitung »Der mutigste Teenager der Welt« Bild »Bewegend erzählt Malala Yousafzai ihr Schicksal.« Brigitte

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