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This collection of 123 brief poems about actual people, places, and things is remarkable for its diversity ans craftsmanship. Allen's epigrams cover everything from Batman and bank machines to famous people and family memories. Although rooted in poetic tradition, these short poems are stunningly contemporary and user-friendly - witty, eloquent, and insightful. With footnotes to give us a bit of background, we move briskly and happily form one topic to another as if we were in a meeting of old friends. Readers describe epigrams as "addictive".
In recent years, scholars have started to look beyond contemptuous representations of chaotic female communities and are beginning to reveal a neglected history of women's cooperative activity. Most work on female collaboration has been in the literary sphere, where the two main topics of relevance are the society of bluestockings and the utopian literary visions of female societies in the eighteenth-century novel. Scholars have highlighted the benefits of female co-operation, but repressive elements have been just as visible. Woman to Woman provides a multi-disciplinary approach to this underexplored theme in order to demonstrate the rich diversity and productivity of female relationships. This collection provides the basis for a more thorough exploration of the benign and beneficial qualities of female communities. Fresh ideas on the study of women's history have revealed that there is still much to be learned about female sociability in all its forms. The most important factor to consider is the vast range of eighteenth-century evidence from public and private sources. Unfortunately, demands of relevance can force investigators to omit some resources from their publications, while devoting close attention to others. Another issue that affects this enterprise is the wide variation in the amount of publicity generated by different forms of female association, and in the care with which they were recorded. These essays draw together the best of current scholarship to show how collaboration enabled eighteenth-century women to intervene in military and political affairs, achieve literary success, experience religious fulfillment, and engage in philanthropic projects. Part I focuses on blood ties, analyzing a range of family relationships; Part II explores female sociability, including various forms of negotiation and co-operation between female friends and companions; Part III provides fascinating new readings of historic figures and events, highlighting the collaborative activity of extraordinary, adventurous women who knowingly risked their lives in order to achieve their goals, including the contemporary exploits of Emma Hamilton and the founding mothers of New France in Canada, and Boadicea's inspiring historical example. This collection honors the late Mary Waldron, whose generous encouragement of other specialists in feminist studies in the long eighteenth century is described in Isobel Grundy's Preface. The volume will interest professional academics, as well as postgraduate and under-graduate students in gender studies and eighteenth-century studies programs.
What did the ancient Greeks eat and drink? What role did migration play? Why was emperor Nero popular with the ordinary people but less so with the upper classes? Why (according to ancient authors) was Oedipus ('with swollen foot') so called? For over 2,000 years the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome have captivated our collective imagination and provided inspiration for so many aspects of our lives, from culture, literature, drama, cinema, and television to society, education, and politics. Many of the roots of the way life is lived in the West today can be traced to the ancient civilizations, not only in politics, law, technology, philosophy, and science, but also in social and family life, language, and art. Beautiful illustrations, clear and authoritative entries, and a useful chronology and bibliography make this Companion the perfect guide for readers interested in learning more about the Graeco-Roman world. As well as providing sound information on all aspects of classical civilization such as history, politics, ethics, morals, law, society, religion, mythology, science and technology, language, literature, art, and scholarship, the entries in the Companion reflect the changing interdisciplinary aspects of classical studies, covering broad thematic subjects, such as race, nationalism, gender, ethics, and ecology, confirming the impact classical civilizations have had on the modern world.
This edition provides an English translation of and detailed commentary on the second book of epigrams published by the Latin poet Marcus Valerius Martialis. The past ten years have seen a resurgence of interest in Martial's writings. But contemporary readers are in particular need of assistance when approaching these epigrams, and until now there has been no modern commentary dedicated to Book II. This new commentary carefully illuminates the allusions to people, places, things, and cultural practices of late first-century Rome that pervade Martial's poetry. It analyzes the epigrammatist's poems as literary creations, treating such topics as the structure of the individual poems and of the book as a whole, and the influence of earlier texts on Martial's language and themes.
Statues of the god Priapus stood in Roman gardens to warn potential thieves that the god would rape them if they attempted to steal from him. In this book, Richlin argues that the attitude of sexual aggressiveness in defense of a bounded area serves as a model for Roman satire from Lucilius to Juvenal. Using literary, anthropological, psychological, and feminist methodologies, she suggests that aggressive sexual humor reinforces aggressive behavior on both the individual and societal levels, and that Roman satire provides an insight into Roman culture. Including a substantial and provocative new introduction, this revised edition is important not only as an in-depth study of Roman sexual satire, but also as a commentary on the effects of all humor on society and its victims.

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