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Both celebratory and reflective, this captivating guide sheds light on the LGBTQ heritage of many National Trust people and places. It commemorates figures such as Vita Sackville-West and her husband Harold Nicolson, owners of Sissinghurst Castle in Kent, but also delves into the lives of lesser-known individuals associated with Trust landscapes and collections, such as William Bankes, who fled from his home at Kingston Lacy to avoid prosecution for homosexuality, and lived abroad for the last 15 years of his life. From Smallhythe, Monk's House, and Nymans in the South East, to Kingston Lacy in the South West and Ickworth in East Anglia, the Trust is exploring places that have been shaped by the sexuality of their inhabitants, workers, owners, and guests. This guide brings to light turbulent stories of exile and tragedy, tales of loving relationships and family, and sometimes challenging histories of public front and private expression.
Documents the history of homosexuality and its representation in art, using objects from the British Museum's collection that date from 9000 BC to the present to illustrate how same-sex love has always been a part of human history.
PRAISE FOR QUEER CITY “Always entertaining . . . much to be recommended.”—The Spectator “A nimble, uproarious pocket history of sex in his beloved metropolis.”—Independent “Ackroyd has an encyclopedic knowledge of London, and a poet’s instinct for its strange, mesmerizing drives and urges . . . Queer City contains something to alarm or fascinate on every page.”—The Mail on Sunday “Droll, provocative and crammed to busting with startling facts.”—The Guardian “Succinct, perceptive and robust.”—Daily Telegraph In Queer City, the acclaimed Peter Ackroyd looks at London in a whole new way–through the complete history and experiences of its gay and lesbian population. In Roman Londinium, the city was dotted with lupanaria (“wolf dens” or public pleasure houses), fornices (brothels), and thermiae (hot baths). Then came the Emperor Constantine, with his bishops, monks, and missionaries. And so began an endless loop of alternating permissiveness and censure. Ackroyd takes us right into the hidden history of the city; from the notorious Normans to the frenzy of executions for sodomy in the early nineteenth century. He journeys through the coffee bars of sixties Soho to Gay Liberation, disco music, and the horror of AIDS. Ackroyd reveals the hidden story of London, with its diversity, thrills, and energy, as well as its terrors, dangers, and risks, and in doing so, explains the origins of all English-speaking gay culture.
This small but lavishly illustrated book showcases a selection of works which illustrate the breadth and depth of queer art from around the world. Exploring identity, eroticism, relationships, hidden desires, love and gender through drawing, painting, photography, sculpture and film, it tells the story of queer art from 1900 to the present, revealing how experiences have also been shaped by class and ethnicity, and how art itself has played a key role in changing attitudes and crystalising identities. From the deeply personal to the political or emotive, each work is beautifully reproduced with a short text explaining its wider social and cultural context, and what 'queer' means in different historic and contemporary contexts. 0Including works from a variety of artists - among them Egon Schiele, Duncan Grant, Romaine Brooks, Edward Burra, Salvador Dali, Frida Kahlo, David Hockney, Diane Arbus, Francis Bacon, Bhupen Khakhar, Zanele Muholi, Allyson Mitchell and Tomoko Kashiki - all of whom found new freedom in radical ideas and new art forms, A Queer Little History of Art is a true celebration of over 100 years of queer art, as well as the LGBT community that has embraced it.
*Engagingly written by local, passionate experts*Based on years of original historical research, encompassing local archives, objects held by the Museum, archaeological findings, oral history sources, and more*Richly illustrated, including maps and a fold-out coverExploring this much-loved public park reveals its story. In the Middle Ages, Gunnersbury belonged to the powerful mistress of a medieval king. Prosperous Tudor merchants and City aldermen followed; its first transformation saw the building of a huge Palladian mansion with formal gardens around 1660. After years of neglect it was reborn as a center of Georgian society; a merchant politician and art collector and then a Hanoverian princess each softened the landscape and built follies. In 1800 the mansion was demolished and development plots sold off; two neighboring villas emerged which still survive. From 1835 one was home to the banking family who eventually reunited the estate, and this building is now the Gunnersbury Park Museum. Gunnersbury was opened as a public park in 1926. This book marks the completion of the recent and extensive conservation programme - its 21st century transformation - in the lead-up to the Park centenary. Published to coincide with the Gunnersbury Park Museum's reopening in spring/summer 2018. Gunnersbury Park receives 30,000-40,000 visitors per year, and this is expected to rise to as many as 1 million visitors per year after the renovation and conservation programme is completed.
In 1861, the death penalty was abolished for sodomy in Britain; just over a century later, in 1967, homosexuality was finally decriminalised. Between these legal landmarks lies a century of seismic shifts in gender and sexuality for men and women. These found expression across the arts as British artists, collectors and consumers explored transgressive identities, experiences and desires. Some of these works were intensely personal, celebrating lovers or expressing private desires. Others addressed a wider public, helping to forge a sense of community at a time when the modern categories of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender were largely unrecognised. Ranging from the playful to the political, the explicit to the domestic, these works showcase the rich diversity of queer British art. This publication, the first to focus exclusively on British queer art, will feature sections on ambivalent sexualities and gender experimentation amongst the Pre-Raphaelites; the new science of sexology's impact on portraiture; queer domesticities in Bloomsbury and beyond; eroticism in the artist's studio and relationships between artists and models; gender play and sexuality in British surrealism; and love and lust in sixties Soho. 00Exhibition: Tate Britain, London, United Kingdom (05.04.2017-01.10.2017).
Influential sexologist and activist Magnus Hirschfeld founded Berlin’s Institute of Sexual Sciences in 1919 as a home and workplace to study homosexual rights activism and support transgender people. It was destroyed by the Nazis in 1933. This episode in history prompted Heike Bauer to ask, Is violence an intrinsic part of modern queer culture? The Hirschfeld Archives answers this critical question by examining the violence that shaped queer existence in the first part of the twentieth century. Hirschfeld himself escaped the Nazis, and many of his papers and publications survived. Bauer examines his accounts of same-sex life from published and unpublished writings, as well as books, articles, diaries, films, photographs and other visual materials, to scrutinize how violence—including persecution, death and suicide—shaped the development of homosexual rights and political activism. The Hirschfeld Archives brings these fragments of queer experience together to reveal many unknown and interesting accounts of LGBTQ life in the early twentieth century, but also to illuminate the fact that homosexual rights politics were haunted from the beginning by racism, colonial brutality, and gender violence.

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