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Preserving New York is the largely unknown inspiring story of the origins of New York City’s nationally acclaimed landmarks law. The decades of struggle behind the law, its intellectual origins, the men and women who fought for it, the forces that shaped it, and the buildings lost and saved on the way to its ultimate passage, span from 1913 to 1965. Intended for the interested public as well as students of New York City history, architecture, and preservation itself, over 100 illustrations help reveal a history richer and more complex than the accepted myth that the landmarks law sprang from the wreckage of the great Pennsylvania Station. Images include those by noted historic photographers as well as those from newspaper accounts of the time. Forgotten civic leaders such as Albert S. Bard and lost buildings including the Brokaw Mansions, are unveiled in an extensively researched narrative bringing this essential episode in New York’s history to future generations tasked with protecting the city’s landmarks. For the first time, the story of how New York won the right to protect its treasured buildings, neighborhoods and special places is brought together to enjoy, inform, and inspire all who love New York.
The definitive resource on the architectural history of New York City. As the definitive resource on the architectural history of New York City, The Landmarks of New York, Fifth Edition documents and illustrates the 1,276 individual landmarks and 102 historic districts that have been accorded landmark status by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission since its establishment in 1965. Arranged chronologically, by date of construction, the book offers a sequential overview of the city’s architectural history and richness, presenting a broad range of styles and building types: colonial farmhouses, Gilded Age mansions, churches, schools, libraries, museums, and the great twentieth-century skyscrapers that are recognized throughout the world. That so many of these structures have endured is due, in large measure, to the efforts of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Since the establishment of the commission, New York City has become the leader of the preservation movement in the United States, with more buildings and districts designated and protected than in any other city. Included here are such iconic structures as Grand Central Station, the Chrysler Building, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Carnegie Hall, as well as those that may be less well known but are of significant historical and architectural value: the Pieter Claesen Wyckoff House in Brooklyn, the oldest structure in New York City; the Bowne House in Queens, the birthplace of American religious freedom; the Watchtower in Marcus Garvey Park in Harlem; the New York Botanical Garden in The Bronx; and Sailors Snug Harbor on Staten Island. In addition to completely updated maps and descriptions of each landmark and historic district included in the previous editions, the fifth edition adds 183 new individual landmarks and 39 new historic district maps. “…vividly chronicles the work of the Landmarks Preservation Commission since 1965 … Since the fourth edition was published, in 2004, Diamonstein-Spielvogel has expanded discussion of modern landmarks, adaptive reuse, and the integration of green technology into existing buildings.” — ARTnews “To read this book from cover to cover is to reread the past 400 years of New York history. [Diamonstein-Spielvogel] has written an excellent introduction … Highly recommended.” — Library Journal “…this hefty compendium connects past to present, promoting a greater appreciation of our architectural heritage.” — Veranda “A spectacular book … Diamonstein-Spielvogel has proven that New York City cares deeply about its past and its connection to the present and future.” — Gotham Magazine “…a classic primer … The latest edition, four years in the making, expands the beloved volume by some 200 pages and offers masses of new photographs.” — Architectural Digest “Witty, wise, and a joy to read, Landmarks of New York takes the reader through the landmarks movement and the city’s rich history while maintaining a focus on the present and future possibilities. This is a must-have for New Yorkers and history buffs alike both as a reference guide and for its inherent value as a well-crafted and oftentimes funny, insightful book.” — Hampton Sheet magazine
The destruction of McKim Mead & White's monumental Penn Station in the mid-1960s was the catalyst for the adoption of the oLandmarks Law,o which established the parameters for protecting and preserving buildings and places that represent New York City's cultural, social, economic, political, and architectural history. Today there are more than 31,000 landmark properties in New York City, most of which are located in 111 historic districts in all five boroughs. The total number of protected sites also includes 1,338 individual landmark buildings, 117 interior landmarks and 10 scenic landmarks. How these sites were chosen, how landmarking has impacted the fabric of the city, and what ithe future holds are the subject of Preserving Place. The story unfolds in essays by notable New Yorkers and preservationists- Robert A. M. Stern, Francoise Bollack, Andrew S. Dolkart, Anthony C. Wood, Claudette Brady, and Adele Chatfield-Taylor. Complementing the text is a specially commissioned portfolio of views of selected historic districts and landmark buildings by the distinguished Dutch architectural photographer Iwan Baan.
Preserving South Street Seaport tells the fascinating story, from the 1960s to the present, of the South Street Seaport District of Lower Manhattan. Home to the original Fulton Fish Market and then the South Street Seaport Museum, it is one of the last neighborhoods of late 18th- and early 19th-century New York City not to be destroyed by urban development. In 1988, South Street Seaport became the city's #1 destination for visitors. Featuring over 40 archival and contemporary black-and-white photographs, this is the first history of a remarkable historic district and maritime museum. Lindgren skillfully tells the complex story of this unique cobblestoned neighborhood. Comprised of deteriorating, 4-5 story buildings in what was known as the Fulton Fish Market, the neighborhood was earmarked for the erection of the World Trade Center until New Jersey forced its placement one mile westward. After Penn Station’s demolition had angered many New York citizens, preservationists mobilized in 1966 to save this last piece of Manhattan’s old port and recreate its fabled 19th-century “Street of Ships.” The South Street Seaport and the World Trade Center became the yin and yang of Lower Manhattan’s rebirth. In an unprecedented move, City Hall designated the museum as developer of the twelve-block urban renewal district. However, the Seaport Museum,whose membership became the largest of any history museum in the city, was never adequately funded, and it suffered with the real estate collapse of 1972. The city, bankers, and state bought the museum’s fifty buildings and leased them back at terms that crippled the museum financially. That led to the controversial construction of the Rouse Company's New Fulton Market (1983) and Pier 17 mall (1985). Lindgren chronicles these years of struggle, as the defenders of the people-oriented museum and historic district tried to save the original streets and buildings and the largest fleet of historic ships in the country from the schemes of developers, bankers, politicians, and even museum administrators. Though the Seaport Museum’s finances were always tenuous, the neighborhood and the museum were improving until the tragedy of 9/11. But the prolonged recovery brought on dysfunctional museum managers and indifference, if not hostility, from City Hall. Superstorm Sandy then dealt a crushing blow. Today, the future of this pioneering museum, designated by Congress as America’s National Maritime Museum, is in doubt, as its waterfront district is eyed by powerful commercial developers. While Preserving South Street Seaport reveals the pitfalls of privatizing urban renewal, developing museum-corporate partnerships, and introducing a professional regimen over a people’s movement, it also tells the story of how a seedy, decrepit piece of waterfront became a wonderful venue for all New Yorkers and visitors from around the world to enjoy. This book will appeal to a wide audience of readers in the history and practice of museums, historic preservation, urban history and urban development, and contemporary New York City. This book is supported by a grant from Furthermore: a program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund.
This well-illustrated book offers an up-to-date synthesis of the field of historic preservation, cast as a social campaign concerned with the condition, treatment and use of the legacy of existing properties in the United States. Drawing on a wide range of research, experience and scholarship over the last fifty years, it allows us to re-think past and current ideas in preservation, challenging readers to explore how their own interests lie within the cognitive framework of the activities taking place with people who care. “Who” is involved is explored first, in such a way as to explore “why”, before examining “what” is deemed important. After that the questions of “when” and “how” to proceed are given attention. The major topics are introduced in an historical review through the mid-1980s, after which the broad intellectual basis and fundamental legal framework is provided. The economic shifts associated with major demographic changes are explored, in tandem with responses of the preservation community. A chapter is dedicated to the financial challenges and sources of revenue available in typical preservation projects, and another chapter focuses on the manner in which seeing, recording, and interpreting information provides the context for an appropriate vision for the future. In this regard, it is made clear that not all “green” design alternatives are preservation-sensitive. The advocacy battles during the last few decades provide a number of short stories of the ethical battles regarding below-ground and above ground historic resources, and the eighth chapter attempts to explain why religion has been long held at arm’s length in publicly-supported preservation efforts, when in fact, it holds more potential to regenerate existing sites than any governmental program.
A wide-ranging study of architectural and cultural preservation in the world's great urban centers examines the devastating impact of war, economics, and indifference on the great cities and efforts throughout China, the U.S. Japan, Europe, and elsewhere to restore and preserve buildings and landmarks. 15,000 first printing.
Some are widely celebrated - Radio City Music Hall, the Great Hall of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Grand Central Station - and others virtually unknown, all warrant preservation. This book is the first to present great landmarked interiors of New York in all their intricate detail, in a visual celebration of space that captures the rich heritage of the city. Located throughout the five boroughs, the interior landmarks include banks, theaters, office building lobbies, restaurants, libraries, and more spaces in which New Yorkers have worked, learned, governed, been entertained, and interacted with their communities for decades.

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