Download Free Property Rights And Natural Resources Studies In International Law Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Property Rights And Natural Resources Studies In International Law and write the review.

Winner of the SLS Peter Birks Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship 2009. The use of private property rights to regulate natural resources is a controversial topic because it touches upon two critical issues: the allocation of wealth in society and the conservation and management of limited resources. This book explores the extension of private property rights and market mechanisms to natural resources in international areas from a legal perspective. It uses marine fisheries to illustrate the issues that can arise in the design of regulatory regimes for natural resources. If property rights are used to regulate natural resources then it is essential that we understand how the law and values embedded within legal systems shape the development and operation of property rights in practice. The author constructs a version of property that articulates both the private and public function of property. This restores some much needed balance to property discourse. He also assesses the impact of international law on the use of property rights-a much neglected topic-and shows how different legal and socio-political values that inhere in different legal regimes fundamentally shape the construction of property rights. Despite the many claimed benefits to be had from the use of private property rights-based management systems, the author warns against an uncritical acceptance of this approach and, in particular, questions whether private property rights are the most suitable and effective arrangement of regulating of natural resources. He suggests that much more complex forms of holding, such as stewardship, may be required to meet physical, legal and moral imperatives associated with natural resources.
Joanne Limburg is a woman who thinks things she doesn't want to think, and who does things she doesn't want to do. As a small child, she would chew her hair all day and lie awake at night wondering if heaven had a ceiling; a few years later, when she should have been doing her homework, she was pacing her bedroom, agonising about the unfairness of lif as a woman, and the shortness of her legs. By the time she was an adult, obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviours had come to dominate her life. She knew that something was wrong with her, but it would take many years before she understood what that something was. The Woman Who Thought Too Much follows Limburg's quest to understand her Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and to manage her symptoms. She takes the reader on a journey through consulting rooms, libraries and internet sites, as she learns about rumination, scrupulosity, avoidance, thought-action fusion, fixed-action patterns, anal fixations, schemas, basal ganglia, tics and synapses. Meanwhile, she does her best to come to terms with an illness which turns out to be common and even - sometimes - treatable. This vividly honest memoir is a sometimes shocking, often humorous revelation of what it is like to live with so debilitating a condition. It is also an exploration of the inner world of a poet and an intense evocation of the persistence and courage of the human spirit in the face of mental illness.
In the world’s developing countries, foreign investment in natural resources brings into contact competing interests that are often characterised by unequal balances of negotiating power – from multinational corporations and host governments, through to the local people affected by the influx of foreign investment. The growing integration of the world economy has been accompanied by rapid and extensive developments in the national and international norms that regulate investment and its impact – including investment law, natural resource law and human rights law. These legal developments affect the ‘shadow’ that the law casts over the multiple negotiations that characterise international investment projects in the developing world. Drawing on international law, the national law of selected jurisdictions and the contracts concluded in a large investment project, Human Rights, Natural Resource and Investment Law in a Globalised World explores the ways in which the law protects the varied property rights that are at play in foreign investment projects in developing countries, with a focus on Africa. Through an integrated analysis of seemingly disparate fields of law, this book sheds new light on how the law mediates the competing interests that come into contact as a result of economic globalisation, whilst also providing new insights on the changing nature of state sovereignty and on the relationship between law and power in a globalised world. This book will be of interest to scholars, students and informed practitioners working in the fields of international investment and human rights law, comparative law, socio-legal studies, and development studies.
Research Handbook on International Law and Natural Resources provides a systematic and comprehensive analysis of the role of international law in regulating the exploration and exploitation of natural resources. It illuminates interactions and tensions between international environmental law, human rights law and international economic law. It also discusses the relevance of soft law, international dispute settlement, as well as of various unilateral, bilateral, regional and transnational initiatives in the governance of natural resources. While the Handbook is accessible to those approaching the subject for the first time, it identifies pressing areas for further investigation that will be of interest to advanced researchers.
In the old days, when offshore stocks were large and fishing fleets were small, there was no call for either private ownership or government regulation. As the growing cities provided increasing markets for both fresh and salted fish, more and larger vessels put to sea for longer periods. By mid-19th century, ocean fishing activity had expanded to a dangerous level and each year's fishing left the stock a little smaller than the year before. In the last decades of the 20th century governments' advice began to come not only from perturbed fishermen, but also from scientists. Today, regulations based on biological theories can be found everywhere. The FishRights99 Conference provided the perfect opportunity to address a new challenge: use property rights to manage fisheries in ways that are ecologically sustainable and ensure Fish for the Future. Part 2 of these proceedings contains papers of presentations made during the workshop sessions, addressing national experiences in the design, implementation and modification of rights-based systems of fisheries management. The presentations included those made from the perspective of the fishing industry, government policy-makers and administrators and the legal implications as a consequence of national systems of law. Those concerned with the social and economic implications of this form of management reviewed the implications for communities affected by such changes in fisheries management approach. Many papers describe specific national implementation experiences, both positive and negative, and national programme successes and "less-than-successes". Other papers deal with the social, economic and legal theory appertaining to this form of management.
Conflicts over natural resources abound in India, where much of the population is dependent on these resources for their livelihoods. Issues of governance and management are complicated by the competing claims of parallel legal systems, including state, customary, religious, project and local laws. Whereas much has been written about property rights, this unique collection takes a legal anthropological perspective to explore how the coexistence and interaction between multiple legal orders provide bases for claiming property rights. It examines how hybrid legal institutions have developed over time in India and how these impact on justice in the governance and distribution of natural resources. The book brings together original case studies that offer fresh perspectives on the governance of forests, water, fisheries and agricultural land in a diverse range of social and spatial contexts. This brand new research provides a timely and persuasive overview of the fundamental role of parallel legal systems in shaping how people manage natural resources. It will be of interest to scholars and practitioners of environmental law, property law, environmental politics, anthropology, sociology and geography.
This casebook explores issues relating to property rights, environmental protection, and natural resources in Indian country. The book explores tribal, cultural and religious relationships with the land, fundamental principles of federal Indian law, land ownership and property rights of tribes, land use and environmental protection, natural resources development, taxation of lands and resources, water rights, usufructuary (hunting, fishing, gathering) rights, and international approaches to indigenous rights in land and natural resources. It is designed to be used in a stand-alone course or as a supplemental reader for courses in environmental law, natural resources law, or Native American studies. The third edition updates the casebook to include recent Supreme Court cases as well as other judicial and legislative developments since 2008. The new edition also expands the materials on cultural and religious resources, the federal trust doctrine, the Cobell settlement, water rights settlements, natural resources damages, and international law.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact