Download Free Punitive States Punishment And The Economy Of Violence Criminology Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Punitive States Punishment And The Economy Of Violence Criminology and write the review.

Are there distinctive postmodern forms of punishment? Is the contemporary 'punitive' turn in the United States a sign of things to come in Europe? Is modern rationality at odds with violence, or the means to applying violence systematically? Punitive States links together these key contemporary debates in criminology, penology and social theory and offers an alternative analysis inspired by Georges Bataille and Rene Girard. The book concludes with three dramatic case studies that relate the foregoing arguments to contemporary cultural forms and political decisions.
Nachdruck des Originals von 1906 ber eine bis heute aktuelle Frage.
Fundamentals of Criminology: New Dimensions delivers a comprehensive and comprehensible introduction to the discipline of criminology. As the title implies, it covers the fundamentals of criminology, including the major theories of crime causation, classic and current empirical tests of those theories, the strengths and weaknesses and the policy implications of each. It also describes the types of crime and provides current rates, trends over time and theoretical explanations for each, as well as a discussion of characteristics of offenders and victims. What sets this book apart from the many other fine criminology textbooks out there is its inclusion of some new dimensions of criminology. The new dimensions in this book include but are not limited to research designs in criminology, new theories of crime causation, crime in different contexts, connections between criminology and criminal justice policy and a number of lingering issues for both disciplines. In combination with the fundamentals, these new dimensions are designed to provide readers with the richest, most complete understanding of what crime is, how much of it there is, what causes it and what do to about it, as well as the ability and desire to pose important questions for the future of both criminology and criminal justice. “The authors have produced a comprehensive, readable, and thoroughly interesting text covering the topic of sociological criminology. Yes, there are a plethora of texts in this area, but Harper and Frailing’s addition to the field has a number of features moving it ahead of the competition. There is in-depth coverage of emerging areas in crime, including cybercrime and human trafficking, as well as an excellent section on how disasters augment the opportunities for crime by hindering capable guardianship. The authors’ arguments for evidence-based crime prevention strategies and public policies are compelling. Fundamentals of Criminology is worthy of the closest consideration by instructors teaching undergraduate criminology courses.” — Jay Corzine, professor of sociology, University of Central Florida
For a full list of entries and contributors, sample entries, and more, visit the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women website. Featuring comprehensive global coverage of women's issues and concerns, from violence and sexuality to feminist theory, the Routledge International Encyclopedia of Women brings the field into the new millennium. In over 900 signed A-Z entries from US and Europe, Asia, the Americas, Oceania, and the Middle East, the women who pioneered the field from its inception collaborate with the new scholars who are shaping the future of women's studies to create the new standard work for anyone who needs information on women-related subjects.
This brand new text identifies the macroeconomic forces relevant to imprisonmentpoverty and political powerlessnessand explores viable and humane alternatives to our current incarceration binge.
Scholars and lay persons alike routinely express concern about the capacity of democratic publics to respond rationally to emotionally charged issues such as crime, particularly when race and class biases are invoked. This is especially true in the United States, which has the highest imprisonment rate in the developed world, the result, many argue, of too many opportunities for elected officials to be highly responsive to public opinion. Limiting the power of democratic publics, in this view, is an essential component of modern governance precisely because of the risk that broad democratic participation can encourage impulsive, irrational and even murderous demands. These claims about panic-prone mass publics--about the dangers of 'mob rule'--are widespread and are the central focus of Lisa L. Miller's The Myth of Mob Rule. Are democratic majorities easily drawn to crime as a political issue, even when risk of violence is low? Do they support 'rational alternatives' to wholly repressive practices, or are they essentially the bellua multorum capitum, the "many-headed beast," winnowing problems of crime and violence down to inexorably harsh retributive justice? Drawing on a comparative case study of three countries--the U.S., the U.K. and the Netherlands--The Myth of Mob Rule explores when and with what consequences crime becomes a politically salient issue. Using extensive data from multiple sources, the analyses reverses many of the accepted causal claims in the literature and finds that: serious violence is an important underlying condition for sustained public and political attention to crime; the United States has high levels of both crime and punishment in part because it has failed, in racially stratified ways, to produce fundamental collective goods that insulate modern democratic citizens from risk of violence, a consequence of a democratic deficit, not a democratic surplus; and finally, countries with multi-party parliamentary systems are more responsive to mass publics than the U.S. on crime and that such responsiveness promotes protection from a range of social risks, including from excessive violence and state repression.

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