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This deluxe two-volume collector's boxed set captures a world at war as seen through the eyes of a generation's greatest reporters. Released to mark the 75th anniversary of America's entrance into World War II, this Library of America two-volume boxed set gathers the acclaimed collection that evokes an extraordinary period in American history--and in American journalism. In two authoritative Library of America volumes, nearly 200 pieces by 80 writers record events from Munich to the birth of the nuclear age. Included are reports by William L. Shirer, Edward R. Murrow, Martha Gellhorn, Ernie Pyle, Margaret Bourke-White, and scores of other of the era's great journalists, as well as the complete texts of two books: Bill Mauldin's Up Front, the classic evocation of war from the GI's point of view, presented with his famous cartoons, and Hiroshima, John Hersey's compassionate account of the first atomic bombing and its aftermath. Each volume contains a chronology, maps, biographical profiles, notes and a glossary, and 32 pages of photographs.
An anthology of articles describing World War II written by numerous journalists from 1938 to 1944.
Interviews and essays describe the way of life and crafts of pioneer America still surviving in the Appalachian region.
W. G. Sebald completed this extraordinary, important and controversial book before his untimely death in December 2001. It is a harrowing study of the devastation of German cities by Allied bombardment in World War II, and an examination of the silence in German literature and culture about this unprecedented trauma. On the Natural History of Destruction is an essential and deeply relevant study of war and society, suffering and amnesia. Like Sebald’s novels, it is studded with meticulous observation, moments of black humour, and throughout, the author’s unmatched intelligence and humanity. From the Trade Paperback edition.
Gathers original newspaper and magazine articles to capture the immediacy of events as they happened during the course of the war
Though historians have largely overlooked Robert Horton, his public relations campaigns remain fixed in popular memory of the home front during World War II. Utilizing all media -- including the nascent technology of television -- to rally civilian support, Horton's work ranged from educational documentary shorts like Pots to Planes, which depicted the transformation of aluminum household items into aircraft, to posters employing scare tactics, such as a German soldier with large eyes staring forward with the tagline "He's Watching You." Iconic and calculated, Horton's campaigns raise important questions about the role of public relations in government agencies. When are promotional campaigns acceptable? Does war necessitate persuasive communication? What separates information from propaganda? Promoting the War Effort traces the career of Horton -- the first book-length study to do so -- and delves into the controversies surrounding federal public relations. A former reporter, Horton headed the public relations department for the U.S. Maritime Commission from 1938 to 1940. Then -- until Pearl Harbor in December 1941 -- he directed the Division of Information (DOI) in the Executive Office of the President, where he played key roles in promoting the New Deal, President Franklin D. Roosevelt's unprecedented third-term reelection campaign, and the prewar arms-production effort. After Pearl Harbor, Horton's DOI encouraged support for the war, primarily focusing on raising civilian and workforce morale. But the DOI under Horton assumed a different wartime tone than its World War I predecessor, the Committee on Public Information. Rather than whipping up prowar hysteria, Horton focused on developing campaigns for more practical purposes, such as conservation and production. In mid-1942, Roosevelt merged the Division and several other agencies into the Office of War Information. Horton stayed in government, working as the PR director for several agencies. He retired in mid-1946, during the postwar demobilization. Promoting the War Effort recovers this influential figure in American politics and contributes to the ongoing public debate about government public relations during a time when questions about how facts are disseminated -- and spun -- are of greater relevance than ever before.
This immensely popular, witty, and highly provocative book is changing people's attitudes about convenience, decor, and technology in home design and furnishing. 10 black-and-white illustrations.

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