Download Free Reporting World War Ii American Journalism 1938 1946 Book in PDF and EPUB Free Download. You can read online Reporting World War Ii American Journalism 1938 1946 and write the review.

An anthology of articles describing World War II written by numerous journalists from 1938 to 1944.
This deluxe two-volume collector's boxed set captures a world at war as seen through the eyes of a generation's greatest reporters. Released to mark the 75th anniversary of America's entrance into World War II, this Library of America two-volume boxed set gathers the acclaimed collection that evokes an extraordinary period in American history--and in American journalism. In two authoritative Library of America volumes, nearly 200 pieces by 80 writers record events from Munich to the birth of the nuclear age. Included are reports by William L. Shirer, Edward R. Murrow, Martha Gellhorn, Ernie Pyle, Margaret Bourke-White, and scores of other of the era's great journalists, as well as the complete texts of two books: Bill Mauldin's Up Front, the classic evocation of war from the GI's point of view, presented with his famous cartoons, and Hiroshima, John Hersey's compassionate account of the first atomic bombing and its aftermath. Each volume contains a chronology, maps, biographical profiles, notes and a glossary, and 32 pages of photographs.
Of the 350,000 American women in uniform during World War II, none instilled more hope in American GIs than Frances Slanger. In Army fatigues and helmet she splashed ashore with the first nurses to hit the Normandy beach in June 1944. Later, from a storm-whipped tent amid the thud of artillery shells, she wrote a letter to Stars and Stripes newspaper that would stir the souls of thousands of weary soldiers. Hundreds wrote heartfelt responses, praising Slanger and her fellow nurses and honoring her humility and patriotism. But Frances Slanger never got to read such praise. She was dead, killed the very next day when German troops shelled her field hospital, the first American nurse to die in Europe after the landing at Normandy. Frances Slanger was a Jewish fruit-peddler's daughter who survived a chilling childhood in World War I-torn Poland and immigrated to America at age seven. Inspired by memories of her bitter past and a Nazi-threatened future, she defied her parents' wishes by becoming a nurse and joining the military. A woman of great integrity and courage, she was also a passionate writer and keeper of chapbooks. This is the story of her too brief life.
Myth and the Greatest Generation calls into question the glowing paradigm of the World War II generation set up by such books as The Greatest Generation by Tom Brokaw. Including analysis of news reports, memoirs, novels, films and other cultural artefacts Ken Rose shows the war was much more disruptive to the lives of Americans in the military and on the home front during World War II than is generally acknowledged. Issues of racial, labor unrest, juvenile delinquency, and marital infidelity were rampant, and the black market flourished. This book delves into both personal and national issues, calling into questions the dominant view of World War II as ‘The Good War’.
This comprehensive volume provides a wealth of information with annotated listings of more than 3,500 titles—a broad sampling of books on the war years 1939-1945. Includes both fiction and nonfiction works about all aspects of the war. Professional resources for educators aligned to the educational standards for social studies; technical references; periodicals and electronic resources; a directory of WWII museums, memorials, and other institutions; and topics for exploration complement this excellent library and classroom resource.
Covers reporters' roles and risks during war time; the issue of censorship; and how their jobs have changed with each conflict since the Civil War.
Includes the work of nearly ninety writers, including Ernie Pyle, Martha Gellhorn, A.J. Liebling, and Edward R. Murrow, capturing the urgency of events as they happened.

Best Books

DMCA - Contact