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As digital natives, our students are certainly at home online, but how much do they know about using the Internet as a research tool? Do they know how to ask the right questions, find the best and most credible resources, evaluate the "facts" they come across, and avoid plagiarism and copyright violations when they incorporate others' work into their own? For too many, the answer is no and research projects intended to engage students in independent learning wind up wasting time or creating incomplete or faulty understandings. In this step-by-step guide, classroom veteran Erik Palmer explains how to teach students at all grade levels to conduct deeper, smarter, and more responsible research in an online environment. You'll find practical lesson ideas for every stage of the research process and dozens of tips and strategies that will build your students' Internet literacy, establish valuable academic habits, and foster skills for lifelong learning.
What’s keeping your school behind the technology curve? Is it a fear of the unfamiliar? Expenses? Or some other myth? Have you considered how students with special needs or students learning a second language may benefit from using digital tools? If you’ve fallen for the perception that technology is too expensive, unnecessary for real learning, or a distraction in the classroom, then you need this book. You use technology in your job. Why not help your students use it in theirs? Educator Matt Renwick debunks five common myths about technology and helps you consider how to fund and manage the devices and create a supportive, schoolwide program. Renwick uses his school’s experiences and examples as a foundation to explain how you can assess and answer your students’ technology needs in terms of access, purpose, and audience--and why you and your school cannot afford to keep students from using technology in their education.
"Most educators are skilled at planning instruction and determining what they will do during the course of a lesson. However, to truly engage students in worthwhile, rigorous cognition, a profound shift is necessary: a shift in emphasis from teaching to learning. Put another way, we know that whoever is doing the work is also doing the learning—and in most classrooms, teachers are working much too hard. Authors John V. Antonetti and James R. Garver are the designers of the Look 2 Learning model of classroom walkthroughs. They've visited more than 17,000 classrooms—examining a variety of teaching and learning conditions, talking to students, examining their work, and determining their levels of thinking and engagement. From this vast set of data, they've drawn salient lessons that provide valuable insight into how to smooth the transition from simply planning instruction to designing high-quality student work. The lessons John and Jim have learned from their 17,000 (and counting) classroom visits can't be wrong. They share those lessons in this book, along with stories of successful practice and practical tools ready for immediate classroom application. The authors also provide opportunities for reflection and closure designed to help you consider (or reconsider) your current beliefs and practices. Throughout, you will hear the voices of John and Jim—and the thousands of students they met—as they provide a map for shifting the classroom dynamic from teaching to learning."
Some of the most interesting people and events of the past often get bypassed in a classroom. This includes a large number of African-Americans who helped build this country. Black History: More Than Just A Month pays tribute to these forgotten individuals and their accomplishments. Some of the people included are war heroes, inventors, celebrities, athletes, etc. This book is a great supplement to any history class.
Co-teaching is an equal partnership between a special education teacher and a general education teacher. They share a classroom and responsibilities for teaching all students in the class. But what does co-teaching look like? How does it work? Are we doing it right? Finding the answers to these questions is critical to the effectiveness of a co-teaching program that is grounded in inclusive educational practices. In this book, you'll learn how co-teachers * Define what effective co-teaching is and what it is not; * Engage students in evolving groups, using multiple perspectives for meaningful learning opportunities; * Resolve differences in teaching and assessment practices; * Respond to parents and students about inclusion and co-teaching concerns; and * Organize and teach an equitable, inclusive classroom. Concise and informative answers to questions posed by real teachers, administrators, and parents help you learn about the components of co-teaching. And vignettes about issues that arise in co-teaching situations will help you start conversations and solve day-to-day challenges inherent to co-teaching. Whether you're already involved in co-teaching programs or are soon to embark on the effort, Teaching in Tandem provides knowledge and tools that you can use to create effective partnerships and powerful learning environments for teachers and students alike. Every teacher, principal, administrator, and paraprofessional who participates in co-teaching--or who is worried about how to address inclusion--needs this book. An additional annotated resource list is available online, along with an ASCD Study Guide.
With the Common Core State Standards emphasizing listening and speaking across the curriculum, these long-neglected language arts are regaining a place in schools. For teachers, this means reexamining practices and rethinking expectations. How much do we know about teaching listening and speaking as the complex communication skills they are? How do we teach students to discuss appropriately, integrate and understand the mountains of information they receive, and express themselves clearly and effectively? In this lively and practical book, 20-year teaching veteran Erik Palmer presents an approach aligned to the six Common Core anchor standards for speaking and listening but focused on preparing students for 21st century communication inside and beyond the classroom. Here, you'll get concrete guidance for teaching and assessing * Collaborative discussion * Listening and media literacy * Questioning and reasoning * Speech presentation * Effective multimedia use * Adapting speech to different content and tasks With due respect to reading and writing, we do most of our communicating--in the classroom and in life--through listening and speaking. Filled with examples and specific activities targeted to variety of subjects and grade levels, this book is an essential resource for all teachers interested in helping students acquire core skills that cross the content areas and support long-term success.
A large part of our everyday communication involves argumentation and reasoning--for example, when we want to persuade others, make good purchasing decisions, or analyze the messages we receive from advertisers and politicians. But how well do we prepare students for these tasks? Can they critically evaluate a speaker's point of view? Understand rhetorical devices? Apply logic? Build an effective argument, whether written or spoken? In his new book, Good Thinking, Erik Palmer shows teachers of all subject matters how to transform the activities they already use into openings for improving student thinking. Building on his previous work in Well Spoken (Stenhouse, 2011) and Digitally Speaking (Stenhouse, 2014), he reveals how all students, not just those in advanced classes, can begin developing sophisticated reasoning skills that will improve their oral and written communications. Blending theory with practice, Palmer shares a wide range of classroom-tested lessons, including ways to understand argument in paintings and images, address ad hominem attacks using a traveling debate, create a class comedy club, write syllogisms, analyze character and plot development, and teach logic through a class Booger Patrol. He explains complex concepts in simple, practical language that gives teachers a deft understanding of the principles of good arguments, proper use of evidence, persuasive techniques, and rhetorical tricks. "Once you start looking, you'll see arguments everywhere," Palmer writes. "All of them are opportunities to teach good thinking."

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