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Be swept into this epic story about a real family and their struggle for liberty and a better life. For 16-year-old Micajah McElroy, life in Wake County, N.C., revolves around managing his inherited plantation and winning the hand of pretty Sarah Campbell. But then as Tories begin burning, stealing and hanging Patriots around him, his Scotch-Irish blood rises. He joins the bloody conflict to fight for liberty, leaving his pregnant wife at home to birth their first child. The Revolutionary War is just the beginning of a journey that takes Micajah and his family over the Appalachian Mountains and into Tennessee, and then on to Alabama. Eventually Micajah's grandchildren's own struggle for liberty compels them, as Confederate soldiers, to fire upon the very flag Micajah fought to defend.
Amy Chua ist Juraprofessorin in Yale und zweifache Mutter. Ihre Kinder will sie zum Erfolg erziehen - mit allen Mitteln. Und gemäß den Regeln ihrer Wurzeln in China ist Erfolg nur mit härtester Arbeit zu erreichen. Sie beschließt, dass ihre Töchter als Musikerinnen Karriere machen sollen. Nun wird deren Kindheit zur Tortur. Wo eine Eins minus als schlechte Note gilt, muss Lernen anders vermittelt werden als in unserer westlichen Pädagogik. In ihrem Erlebnisbericht erzählt die Autorin fesselnd, witzig und mit kluger Offenheit von einem gnadenlosen Kampf, der ihr und ihren Töchtern alles abverlangte: ein packendes und hochkomisches Buch über Familie und Erziehung, über Leistungsdruck und über den Willen, unbedingt zu siegen.
Renowned historian Benson Bobrick has written a moving chronicle of the American Revolution for young readers. From the first stirrings of unrest under British rule at the Boston Tea Party, to the treachery of Benedict Arnold at West Point, to George Washington's Christmas Eve surprise attack at the Battle of Trenton, to the British surrender at the Battle of Yorktown, Fight for Freedom explores the war that created one independent nation out of thirteen diverse colonies. Fight for Freedom contains personal anecdotes from soldiers and civilians, as well as profiles of the many historical luminaries who were involved in America's fight for independence, such as George Washington, King George III, Abigail Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Paul Jones, Thomas Jefferson, and Lord Cornwallis. Bobrick also explores the origins of colonialism in the New World, the roles women and Native Americans played during the American Revolution, the intricacies of building a new government, and the fate of those who remained loyal to the British crown after the onset of war. Bobrick's dynamic narrative is highlighted with many period oil paintings, political cartoons, and key campaign and battlefield maps, making Fight for Freedom the ultimate book on the American Revolution for kids.
“Excellent . . . deserves high praise. Mr. Taylor conveys this sprawling continental history with economy, clarity, and vividness.”—Brendan Simms, Wall Street Journal The American Revolution is often portrayed as a high-minded, orderly event whose capstone, the Constitution, provided the nation its democratic framework. Alan Taylor, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, gives us a different creation story in this magisterial history. The American Revolution builds like a ground fire overspreading Britain’s colonies, fueled by local conditions and resistant to control. Emerging from the continental rivalries of European empires and their native allies, the revolution pivoted on western expansion as well as seaboard resistance to British taxes. When war erupted, Patriot crowds harassed Loyalists and nonpartisans into compliance with their cause. The war exploded in set battles like Saratoga and Yorktown and spread through continuing frontier violence. The discord smoldering within the fragile new nation called forth a movement to concentrate power through a Federal Constitution. Assuming the mantle of “We the People,” the advocates of national power ratified the new frame of government. But it was Jefferson’s expansive “empire of liberty” that carried the revolution forward, propelling white settlement and slavery west, preparing the ground for a new conflagration.
This volume fills a gap in traditional women's history books by offering fascinating details of the lives of early American women and showing how these women adapted to the challenges of daily life in the colonies. * Nearly 200 A–Z entries on women's lives, contributions, and struggles during the years of early America * Illustrations of the habits of dress, material goods, and buildings that reflect the culture of these women * Extensive annotated bibliography of recommended readings covering legal issues, ethnic groups, customs, and novels set during the era * Sidebars highlighting interesting experiences of early American women
The untold story of William Morgan, the man who left Ohio to become a high-ranking leader in Fidel Castro’s rebel army: “Reads like a great epic novel” (Carlos Eire, author of Waiting for Snow in Havana). When William Morgan was twenty-two years old, he was working as a high school janitor in Toledo, Ohio. Seven years later, in 1958, he walked into a rebel camp in the Cuban jungle to join the revolutionaries in their fight to overthrow the corrupt Cuban president, Fulgencio Batista. The rebels were wary of the broad-shouldered, blond-haired, blue-eyed Americano—but Morgan’s dedication and passion, his military skill and charisma, led him to become a chief comandante in Castro’s army. He was the only foreigner to hold such a rank, with the exception of Che Guevara. Based on interviews with his friends, family, and former fellow rebels, as well as FBI and CIA documents, this is the remarkable story of his journey—and how it ended in 1961, when at the age of thirty-two, he was executed by firing squad at the hands of Fidel Castro. “William Morgan, an American who made his way to the front line of Castro’s revolution in Cuba, gets thorough and entertaining treatment in this biography. Largely unknown in the U.S., his story is filled with the suspense of a blockbuster war movie, offering new and insightful perspective into the political climate of 1950s Cuba . . . [turns] the intriguing story of one man into a thoughtful examination of 20th-century Cuban history.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review “A figure straight out of Hemingway.” —Kirkus Reviews “The Americano’s strength lies in explaining how the three anti-Batista forces constantly jockeyed for supremacy and influence. . . . Shetterly nicely weaves FBI, CIA and State Department files on Morgan into his narrative.” —The Washington Post Book World
James Boggs (1919-1993) and Grace Lee Boggs (1915-2015) were two largely unsung but critically important figures in the black freedom struggle. Born and raised in Alabama, James Boggs came to Detroit during the Great Migration, becoming an automobile worker and a union activist. Grace Lee was a Chinese American scholar who studied Hegel, worked with Caribbean political theorist C. L. R. James, and moved to Detroit to work toward a new American revolution. As husband and wife, the couple was influential in the early stages of what would become the Black Power movement, laying the intellectual foundation for racial and urban struggles during one of the most active social movement periods in recent U.S. history. Stephen Ward details both the personal and the political dimensions of the Boggses' lives, highlighting the vital contributions these two figures made to black activist thinking. At once a dual biography of two crucial figures and a vivid portrait of Detroit as a center of activism, Ward's book restores the Boggses, and the intellectual strain of black radicalism they shaped, to their rightful place in postwar American history.

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