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A collection of 19 road guides that explore the region's broad and deep geologic story.
Millions of years ago, the North American continent was dragged over the world's largest continental hotspot, a huge column of hot and molten rock rising from the Earth's interior that traced a 50-mile wide, 500-mile-long path northeastward across Idaho. Generating cataclysmic volcanic eruptions and large earthquakes, the hotspot helped lift the Yellowstone Plateau to more than 7,000 feet and pushed the northern Rockies to new heights, forming unusually large glaciers to carve the landscape. It also created the jewel of the U.S. national park system: Yellowstone. Meanwhile, forces stretching apart the western U.S. created the mountainous glory of Grand Teton National Park. These two parks, with their majestic mountains, dazzling geysers, and picturesque hot springs, are windows into the Earth's interior, revealing the violent power of the dynamic processes within. Smith and Siegel offer expert guidance through this awe-inspiring terrain, bringing to life the grandeur of these geologic phenomena as they reveal the forces that have shaped--and continue to shape--the greater Yellowstone-Teton region. Over seventy illustrations--including fifty-two in full color--illuminate the breathtaking beauty of the landscape, while two final chapters provide driving tours of the parks to help visitors enjoy and understand the regions wonders. Fascinating and informative, this book affords us a striking new perspective on Earth's creative forces.
Although it's also known for for wolves, bison, and stunning scenery, Yellowstone National Park was established as the world's first national park in 1872 largely because of its geological wonders. In Geology Underfoot in Yellowstone Country, author and geologist Marc Hendrix takes you to over twenty sites in the park and surrounding region that illustrate the deep-time story of Yellowstone Country, from its early existence as a seafloor hundreds of millions of years ago to an earthquake swarm in 2008 that caused some folks to wonder if the Yellowstone Volcano was going to blow its top—again. Besides covering icons such as Old Faithful and Mammoth Hot Springs, Geology Underfoot in Yellowstone Country visits sites that are less well known but just as mind blowing, including outcrops of rock deposited by superfast incendiary flows of hot ash; the glacially sculpted grandeur of the Beartooth and Absaroka mountains witnessed along the Beartooth Highway; and the deadly Madison landslide that killed twenty-eight people in 1959. With prose tooled for the lay reader and a multitude of colorful photos and illustrations, Geology Underfoot in Yellowstone Country will help you read the landscape the way a geologist does.
Here, for the first time in paperback, is a fascinating daily record of Ferdinand Hayden?s historic 1871 scientific expedition through Utah, Idaho, and Montana Territories to the Yellowstone Basin. The expedition?s findings quickly led Congress to establish Yellowstone as the world?s first national park. In addition to its scientific discoveries, the expedition is famous for producing the earliest on-site images of Yellowstone, by its photographer, William Henry Jackson, and its guest artist, Thomas Moran. ø Marlene Deahl Merrill has woven together a compelling daily narrative from the field writings of three expedition members: unpublished journals kept by mineralogist Albert Peale and geologist George Allen, periodic reports by Peale to his hometown newspaper, and letters from Hayden to his friend and mentor Spencer Baird at the Smithsonian Institution. Enriching this narrative are Jackson?s photographs of camp scenes and landscapes; rare panoramic drawings by the party?s topographical artist, Henry Elliott; maps; an introduction; and extensive annotations.
Schullery's book details the ecological history of Yellowstone National Park.
Arches National Park. Bryce Canyon. Zion. When one thinks of Utah, it's rocks and iconic landforms—preserved in a nearly endless list of national parks and monuments—come immediately to mind. Perhaps more so than any other state, Utah is built for geologic exploration, and geologists/authors Felicie Williams, Lucy Chronic, and Halka Chronic are its expert tour guides.The Beehive State is splitting at the seams with wondrous geological contrast. Utah's high mountains, showcasing the results of what happens as the Earth bends, folds, and breaks itself apart, run like a backbone down the center of the state. To the east, the Colorado Plateau's flat-lying sedimentary rock is wondrously exposed in canyons, arches, and breaks. To the west is the immense Great Basin, a region characterized by rank upon rank of long, narrow, gaunt mountain ranges alternating with desert basins that are among the flattest surfaces on Earth.Roadside Geology of Utah's 65 road guides traverse the state's major thoroughfares as well as its dusty, sleepy, winding two-lane highways. With fresh prose and more than 300 color photos, maps, and figures to boot, you too will become expert at reading Utah's rocks.
"Interpreting the Landscape of Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks" takes us into the natural world we see today through the prism of geology. It is difficult to gaze upon the Teton Range, the high plateaus of Yellowstone, the lakes, canyons, and land forms of the two parks and their immediate environs without asking how and when they were formed. This book answers these questions, and more. The text, photography, and graphics demonstrate that most of what we see today is young, geologically speaking - the product of volcanic eruptions, profound glaciation, and earth movements. Perhaps the most interesting of all, the book describes how processes originating half way to the earth's center seem to be the primary force which created volcanic fires, glacial ice, and the mountain ranges of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

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