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This book summarizes current knowledge regarding the theory of estimation for semiparametric models with missing data, in an organized and comprehensive manner. It starts with the study of semiparametric methods when there are no missing data. The description of the theory of estimation for semiparametric models is both rigorous and intuitive, relying on geometric ideas to reinforce the intuition and understanding of the theory. These methods are then applied to problems with missing, censored, and coarsened data with the goal of deriving estimators that are as robust and efficient as possible.
Survival analysis arises in many fields of study including medicine, biology, engineering, public health, epidemiology, and economics. This book provides a comprehensive treatment of Bayesian survival analysis. It presents a balance between theory and applications, and for each class of models discussed, detailed examples and analyses from case studies are presented whenever possible. The applications are all from the health sciences, including cancer, AIDS, and the environment.
This is the second edition of a coherent introduction to the subject of asymptotic statistics as it has developed over the past 50 years. It differs from the first edition in that it is now more 'reader friendly' and also includes a new chapter on Gaussian and Poisson experiments, reflecting their growing role in the field. Most of the subsequent chapters have been entirely rewritten and the nonparametrics of Chapter 7 have been amplified. The volume is not intended to replace monographs on specialized subjects, but will help to place them in a coherent perspective. It thus represents a link between traditional material - such as maximum likelihood, and Wald's Theory of Statistical Decision Functions -- together with comparison and distances for experiments. Much of the material has been taught in a second year graduate course at Berkeley for 30 years.
Temporal and spatiotemporal data form an inherent fabric of the society as we are faced with streams of data coming from numerous sensors, data feeds, recordings associated with numerous areas of application embracing physical and human-generated phenomena (environmental data, financial markets, Internet activities, etc.). A quest for a thorough analysis, interpretation, modeling and prediction of time series comes with an ongoing challenge for developing models that are both accurate and user-friendly (interpretable). The volume is aimed to exploit the conceptual and algorithmic framework of Computational Intelligence (CI) to form a cohesive and comprehensive environment for building models of time series. The contributions covered in the volume are fully reflective of the wealth of the CI technologies by bringing together ideas, algorithms, and numeric studies, which convincingly demonstrate their relevance, maturity and visible usefulness. It reflects upon the truly remarkable diversity of methodological and algorithmic approaches and case studies. This volume is aimed at a broad audience of researchers and practitioners engaged in various branches of operations research, management, social sciences, engineering, and economics. Owing to the nature of the material being covered and a way it has been arranged, it establishes a comprehensive and timely picture of the ongoing pursuits in the area and fosters further developments.
The statistics profession is at a unique point in history. The need for valid statistical tools is greater than ever; data sets are massive, often measuring hundreds of thousands of measurements for a single subject. The field is ready to move towards clear objective benchmarks under which tools can be evaluated. Targeted learning allows (1) the full generalization and utilization of cross-validation as an estimator selection tool so that the subjective choices made by humans are now made by the machine, and (2) targeting the fitting of the probability distribution of the data toward the target parameter representing the scientific question of interest. This book is aimed at both statisticians and applied researchers interested in causal inference and general effect estimation for observational and experimental data. Part I is an accessible introduction to super learning and the targeted maximum likelihood estimator, including related concepts necessary to understand and apply these methods. Parts II-IX handle complex data structures and topics applied researchers will immediately recognize from their own research, including time-to-event outcomes, direct and indirect effects, positivity violations, case-control studies, censored data, longitudinal data, and genomic studies.
This book deals with the mathematical aspects of survival analysis and reliability as well as other topics, reflecting recent developments in the following areas: applications in epidemiology; probabilistic and statistical models and methods in reliability; models and methods in survival analysis, longevity, aging, and degradation; accelerated life models; quality of life; new statistical challenges in genomics. The work will be useful to a broad interdisciplinary readership of researchers and practitioners in applied probability and statistics, industrial statistics, biomedicine, biostatistics, and engineering.
Drawing from the authors’ own work and from the most recent developments in the field, Missing Data in Longitudinal Studies: Strategies for Bayesian Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis describes a comprehensive Bayesian approach for drawing inference from incomplete data in longitudinal studies. To illustrate these methods, the authors employ several data sets throughout that cover a range of study designs, variable types, and missing data issues. The book first reviews modern approaches to formulate and interpret regression models for longitudinal data. It then discusses key ideas in Bayesian inference, including specifying prior distributions, computing posterior distribution, and assessing model fit. The book carefully describes the assumptions needed to make inferences about a full-data distribution from incompletely observed data. For settings with ignorable dropout, it emphasizes the importance of covariance models for inference about the mean while for nonignorable dropout, the book studies a variety of models in detail. It concludes with three case studies that highlight important features of the Bayesian approach for handling nonignorable missingness. With suggestions for further reading at the end of most chapters as well as many applications to the health sciences, this resource offers a unified Bayesian approach to handle missing data in longitudinal studies.

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