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This book summarizes current knowledge regarding the theory of estimation for semiparametric models with missing data, in an organized and comprehensive manner. It starts with the study of semiparametric methods when there are no missing data. The description of the theory of estimation for semiparametric models is both rigorous and intuitive, relying on geometric ideas to reinforce the intuition and understanding of the theory. These methods are then applied to problems with missing, censored, and coarsened data with the goal of deriving estimators that are as robust and efficient as possible.
Temporal and spatiotemporal data form an inherent fabric of the society as we are faced with streams of data coming from numerous sensors, data feeds, recordings associated with numerous areas of application embracing physical and human-generated phenomena (environmental data, financial markets, Internet activities, etc.). A quest for a thorough analysis, interpretation, modeling and prediction of time series comes with an ongoing challenge for developing models that are both accurate and user-friendly (interpretable). The volume is aimed to exploit the conceptual and algorithmic framework of Computational Intelligence (CI) to form a cohesive and comprehensive environment for building models of time series. The contributions covered in the volume are fully reflective of the wealth of the CI technologies by bringing together ideas, algorithms, and numeric studies, which convincingly demonstrate their relevance, maturity and visible usefulness. It reflects upon the truly remarkable diversity of methodological and algorithmic approaches and case studies. This volume is aimed at a broad audience of researchers and practitioners engaged in various branches of operations research, management, social sciences, engineering, and economics. Owing to the nature of the material being covered and a way it has been arranged, it establishes a comprehensive and timely picture of the ongoing pursuits in the area and fosters further developments.
This book deals with the mathematical aspects of survival analysis and reliability as well as other topics, reflecting recent developments in the following areas: applications in epidemiology; probabilistic and statistical models and methods in reliability; models and methods in survival analysis, longevity, aging, and degradation; accelerated life models; quality of life; new statistical challenges in genomics. The work will be useful to a broad interdisciplinary readership of researchers and practitioners in applied probability and statistics, industrial statistics, biomedicine, biostatistics, and engineering.
This book presents a systematic and unified approach for modern nonparametric treatment of missing and modified data via examples of density and hazard rate estimation, nonparametric regression, filtering signals, and time series analysis. All basic types of missing at random and not at random, biasing, truncation, censoring, and measurement errors are discussed, and their treatment is explained. Ten chapters of the book cover basic cases of direct data, biased data, nondestructive and destructive missing, survival data modified by truncation and censoring, missing survival data, stationary and nonstationary time series and processes, and ill-posed modifications. The coverage is suitable for self-study or a one-semester course for graduate students with a prerequisite of a standard course in introductory probability. Exercises of various levels of difficulty will be helpful for the instructor and self-study. The book is primarily about practically important small samples. It explains when consistent estimation is possible, and why in some cases missing data should be ignored and why others must be considered. If missing or data modification makes consistent estimation impossible, then the author explains what type of action is needed to restore the lost information. The book contains more than a hundred figures with simulated data that explain virtually every setting, claim, and development. The companion R software package allows the reader to verify, reproduce and modify every simulation and used estimators. This makes the material fully transparent and allows one to study it interactively. Sam Efromovich is the Endowed Professor of Mathematical Sciences and the Head of the Actuarial Program at the University of Texas at Dallas. He is well known for his work on the theory and application of nonparametric curve estimation and is the author of Nonparametric Curve Estimation: Methods, Theory, and Applications. Professor Sam Efromovich is a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the American Statistical Association.
Missing data affect nearly every discipline by complicating the statistical analysis of collected data. But since the 1990s, there have been important developments in the statistical methodology for handling missing data. Written by renowned statisticians in this area, Handbook of Missing Data Methodology presents many methodological advances and the latest applications of missing data methods in empirical research. Divided into six parts, the handbook begins by establishing notation and terminology. It reviews the general taxonomy of missing data mechanisms and their implications for analysis and offers a historical perspective on early methods for handling missing data. The following three parts cover various inference paradigms when data are missing, including likelihood and Bayesian methods; semi-parametric methods, with particular emphasis on inverse probability weighting; and multiple imputation methods. The next part of the book focuses on a range of approaches that assess the sensitivity of inferences to alternative, routinely non-verifiable assumptions about the missing data process. The final part discusses special topics, such as missing data in clinical trials and sample surveys as well as approaches to model diagnostics in the missing data setting. In each part, an introduction provides useful background material and an overview to set the stage for subsequent chapters. Covering both established and emerging methodologies for missing data, this book sets the scene for future research. It provides the framework for readers to delve into research and practical applications of missing data methods.
Kosorok’s brilliant text provides a self-contained introduction to empirical processes and semiparametric inference. These powerful research techniques are surprisingly useful for developing methods of statistical inference for complex models and in understanding the properties of such methods. This is an authoritative text that covers all the bases, and also a friendly and gradual introduction to the area. The book can be used as research reference and textbook.

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