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This easy-to-follow textbook introduces the mathematical language, knowledge and problem-solving skills that undergraduates need to study computing. The language is in part qualitative, with concepts such as set, relation, function and recursion/induction; but it is also partly quantitative, with principles of counting and finite probability. Entwined with both are the fundamental notions of logic and their use for representation and proof. Features: teaches finite math as a language for thinking, as much as knowledge and skills to be acquired; uses an intuitive approach with a focus on examples for all general concepts; brings out the interplay between the qualitative and the quantitative in all areas covered, particularly in the treatment of recursion and induction; balances carefully the abstract and concrete, principles and proofs, specific facts and general perspectives; includes highlight boxes that raise common queries and clear confusions; provides numerous exercises, with selected solutions.
Logic is a branch of philosophy, mathematics and computer science. It studies the required methods to determine whether a statement is true, such as reasoning and computation. Proofs and Algorithms: Introduction to Logic and Computability is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of contemporary logic - those of a proof, a computable function, a model and a set. It presents a series of results, both positive and negative, - Church's undecidability theorem, Gödel’s incompleteness theorem, the theorem asserting the semi-decidability of provability - that have profoundly changed our vision of reasoning, computation, and finally truth itself. Designed for undergraduate students, this book presents all that philosophers, mathematicians and computer scientists should know about logic.
John Vince describes a range of mathematical topics to provide a foundation for an undergraduate course in computer science, starting with a review of number systems and their relevance to digital computers, and finishing with differential and integral calculus. Readers will find that the author's visual approach will greatly improve their understanding as to why certain mathematical structures exist, together with how they are used in real-world applications. Each chapter includes full-colour illustrations to clarify the mathematical descriptions, and in some cases, equations are also coloured to reveal vital algebraic patterns. The numerous worked examples will consolidate comprehension of abstract mathematical concepts. Foundation Mathematics for Computer Science covers number systems, algebra, logic, trigonometry, coordinate systems, determinants, vectors, matrices, geometric matrix transforms, differential and integral calculus, and reveals the names of the mathematicians behind such inventions. During this journey, John Vince touches upon more esoteric topics such as quaternions, octonions, Grassmann algebra, Barycentric coordinates, transfinite sets and prime numbers. Whether you intend to pursue a career in programming, scientific visualisation, systems design, or real-time computing, you should find the author’s literary style refreshingly lucid and engaging, and prepare you for more advanced texts.
This textbook provides an engaging and motivational introduction to traditional topics in discrete mathematics, in a manner specifically designed to appeal to computer science students. The text empowers students to think critically, to be effective problem solvers, to integrate theory and practice, and to recognize the importance of abstraction. Clearly structured and interactive in nature, the book presents detailed walkthroughs of several algorithms, stimulating a conversation with the reader through informal commentary and provocative questions. Features: no university-level background in mathematics required; ideally structured for classroom-use and self-study, with modular chapters following ACM curriculum recommendations; describes mathematical processes in an algorithmic manner; contains examples and exercises throughout the text, and highlights the most important concepts in each section; selects examples that demonstrate a practical use for the concept in question.
John Vince explains a wide range of mathematical techniques and problem-solving strategies associated with computer games, computer animation, virtual reality, CAD, and other areas of computer graphics. Covering all the mathematical techniques required to resolve geometric problems and design computer programs for computer graphic applications, each chapter explores a specific mathematical topic prior to moving forward into the more advanced areas of matrix transforms, 3D curves and surface patches. Problem-solving techniques using vector analysis and geometric algebra are also discussed. All the key areas are covered including: Numbers, Algebra, Trigonometry, Coordinate geometry, Transforms, Vectors, Curves and surfaces, Barycentric coordinates, Analytic geometry. Plus – and unusually in a student textbook – a chapter on geometric algebra is included.
This book uses a functional programming language (F#) as a metalanguage to present all concepts and examples, and thus has an operational flavour, enabling practical experiments and exercises. It includes basic concepts such as abstract syntax, interpretation, stack machines, compilation, type checking, garbage collection, and real machine code. Also included are more advanced topics on polymorphic types, type inference using unification, co- and contravariant types, continuations, and backwards code generation with on-the-fly peephole optimization. This second edition includes two new chapters. One describes compilation and type checking of a full functional language, tying together the previous chapters. The other describes how to compile a C subset to real (x86) hardware, as a smooth extension of the previously presented compilers.The examples present several interpreters and compilers for toy languages, including compilers for a small but usable subset of C, abstract machines, a garbage collector, and ML-style polymorphic type inference. Each chapter has exercises. Programming Language Concepts covers practical construction of lexers and parsers, but not regular expressions, automata and grammars, which are well covered already. It discusses the design and technology of Java and C# to strengthen students’ understanding of these widely used languages.
This engaging text presents the fundamental mathematics and modelling techniques for computing systems in a novel and light-hearted way, which can be easily followed by students at the very beginning of their university education. Key concepts are taught through a large collection of challenging yet fun mathematical games and logical puzzles that require no prior knowledge about computers. The text begins with intuition and examples as a basis from which precise concepts are then developed; demonstrating how, by working within the confines of a precise structured method, the occurrence of errors in the system can be drastically reduced. Features: demonstrates how game theory provides a paradigm for an intuitive understanding of the nature of computation; contains more than 400 exercises throughout the text, with detailed solutions to half of these presented at the end of the book, together with numerous theorems, definitions and examples; describes a modelling approach based on state transition systems.

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